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THE GIFT OF 



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^SELECT COMMITTEE ON 
U. 8. SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

SIXTY-SIXTH GONGBBSS 
BBCOMD BB8SIOM 



RECONDITIONING OF U. S. S. LEVIATHAN 



PART 4 







177061 



WASHINGTON 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1920 



^ 



SELECT COMMITTEE ON UNITED STATES SHIPPING BOAai> 

OPERATIONS. 

House of Repbesentatiyes. 

JOSEPH WALSH, Massachusetts, Oha4rman, 
PATRICK H. KBLLBY, Michigan. HBNBY J. STESLB, Pemiqylyanla. 

LINDLBY H. HADLEY, Washington. TOM CX)NNALLY, Texas. 

I8RABL M. F08TBB, Ohio. 

Qbobob H. Nobton, derh, 
n 






GIFT OF 
JUDGE L. C :.:a:4T0N 



I 



CONTENTS. 



Part 4. 
TeBtimony of— T^H^ 

Ko1>ert L. Hague, Director ConBtruction and Repair Department, United 

r States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation 1245, 1259, 1281, 1409 

' lieut. Commander F. S. Crisp, United Statee Navy, navy yard. New York. 1269 

^' Philip A. S. Franklin, president International Mercantile Marine ("o., 

(5 New York City 1296 1408, 1412, 1419 

R William F. Gibbs, chief of construction International Mercantile Marine 

* Co., New York City 1344 

t Henry Randolph Smith, New York City 1379 

i i Andrew Fletcher, president of W. & A. Fletcher Co., Hoboken, N. J. 1381, 1409 

fe Edward P. Morse, president Morse Dry Dock Co., Brooklyn, N. Y 1383 

7 William H. Todd, president Todd Shipyard Corporation, New York City. . 1386 

John h. Curley, general manager James Shewan & Sons (Inc.), Brooklyn, 

N. Y 1394,1402 

James Shewan, president James Shewan & Sons (Inc.), Brooklyn, N. Y.. 1402 
Thomas A. Brogan, auditor of repairs. United States Shipping Board 
pjmtJgency Fleet Corporation, New York City 1414 

in 



BOARD OPERATIONS. 



Select Comhittee on I 'nited States 

Shipping Board Operations, 

House of Representatives, 
New York City, Monday, Afay 10, 19J0, 

The committee met at 10.30 o'clock a. m., in room 804 of the 
offices of the United States Shipping Board at 45 Broadway, New 
York City, Hon. Joseph Walsh (chairman) presiding. 

Present also: Hon. r. H. Kelley, Hon. L. H. Hadloy, and Hon. Tom 
Connally. 

The Chairman. The committee will please come to order. The 
chairman understands that Mr. Todd, Air. Fletcher, Mr. Franklin, 
and yb. Morse, have either been subpoenaed or requested to be 
present at the hearing this morning. Tne Chair will state that those 
gentlemen, Mr. Todd, Mr. Fletcher, Mr. Franklin, and Morse, may be 
excused for the day^ if they so desire. We would like them to bo 
present to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock. 

Is Mr. Hague present ( Mr. Hague, you will take the chair, please. 

TESTIMOlfT OF MR. BOBEBT LYONS HAGUE, DIBECTOB OF COB- 
STBTTCTION AND BEPAIB DEPABTMENT, UNITED STATES 
SHIPPING BOABD EMEBGENCT FLEET COBPOBATION. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 

The Chairman. What is your name ? 

Mr. Hague. Robert Lyons Hague. 

The Chairman. You are an official of the Shipping Board or Fleet 
Corporation ? 

Mr. Hague. Of the Fleet Corporation. 

The Chairman. What position do you hold ? 

Mr. Hague. Director of the Constru(!tion and Repair Department. 

The Chairman. How long have you held that position ? 

Mr. Hague. As director, approxmiately since the 1st of March. 

The Chairman. Were you formerly connected with the Fleet 
Corporation ? 

Mr. Hague. I have been connected with the Fleet Corporation, 
with the Division of Operations in Washington from approximately 
November, 1919, up until that time. 

The Chairman. What was your occupation before going to the 
Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Hague. I was a naval architect and engineer in chief of the 
Standard Oil Cos. on the Pacific coast. 

The Chairman. Where were your headquarters ? 

Mr. Hague. San Francisco, Calif. 

The Chairman. Where are your headquarters now, Mr. Hague ? 

1245 



1246 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Hague. Technically speaking they are in Washington. I have 
an office in New York ana an office in Pniladelphia. 

The Chairman. And you are in charge for the Fleet Corporation 
of the construction and repair work that is now being conducted by 
the Emergency Fleet Corporation or the Shipping Board t 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. To whom do you report ? 

Mr. Hague. I report on repair matters to the board and the chair- 
man; on construction matters to the board and to the chairman as 
well; on repair matters I also report — consult, rather, as well as 
report, to the director of operations, Capt. Foley. 

The Chairman. Where is he located ? 

Mr. Hague. Washington. 

The Chairman. Haye you had to do with letting contracts or 
calling for bids for reconditioning of ships, so-called ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many of those contracts are outstanding at 
the present time ? 

Mr. Hague. Still outstanding ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Hague. There are two contracts. 

The Chairman. Which are the two ? 

Mr. Hague. The Huron, which the Morse Dry Dock Co. are finishing 
up, and the Aeolufi, which is now being repaired at the Baltimore Dry 
Dock & Construction in Baltimore. 

The Chairman. How many ships are there yet to be reconditioned? 

Mr. Hague. May I consult my notes? 

The Chairman. Certainly. 

Mr. Hague (referring to memoranda). Approximately 12. When 
I say approximately it depends on the board's action as to whether 
they will be cargo, cargo and passenger, or passenger vessels. 

The Chairman. So there are some of these ships yet to be recon- 
ditioned 

Mr. Hague. Ye^, sir. 

The Chairman. As to which it has not yet been determined to what 
condition they will be restored ; whether ireight, passenger, or a com- 
bination of two? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. That depends on the condition of the ships 
turned back to us by the Army. 

The Chairman, ^ow, the Huron, which you say is approaching 
completion 

Mr. Hague. She is practically finished. 

The Chairman. Was the contract for that ship let direct with the 
Morse Dry Dock ? 

Mr. Hague. It was let as a result of competitive bidding in which 
Morse were the low bidders. 

The Chairman. And was the contract directly with the Shipping 
Board or through an a^ent? 

Mr. Hague. It was direct with the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. And the Aeolus ? 

Mr. Hague. The same condition applies to the Aeolus, 

The Chairman. Who is charged with the preparation of contracts 
and specifications for this work 1 
Mr. Hague. In the case of these two vessels I had direct charge. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 124? 

The Chairman. You prepared the specifications? 

Mr. Hagtte. Through my office; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is mere any ship yet to be reconditioned for which 
bids have been asked ? 

Mr. Hague. There were two ships on which bids were asked, and 
the bids were so high that the board deemed it advisable not to 
proceed with the wonk as we had planned. 

The Chairman. What ships? 

Mr. Hague. The DeKalh and the Otsego, 

The Chairman. Passenger ships ? 

Mr. Hague. The DeKmb was a passenger ship. The Otsego is a 
combination passenger and freight vessel. 

The Chairman. Did the Shipping Board ask for bids on those ships 
direct? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Not through an agent? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there any other ship upon which reconditioning 
work is to be done for which bids have been asked? 

Mr. Hague. Not as yet. 

The Chairman. Has the Shipping Board entered into a contract 
with anybody to act as agent in doing this reconditioning work upon 
any ship ? 

ilr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What concern has that contract been made with? 

Mr. Hague. The International Mercantile Marine, on the steamer 
LevicUhan. 
The Chairman. Any other contract? 

Mr. Hague. Not for reconditioning. 

The Chairman. Was this a contract with the International Mer- 
cantile Marine to act as agent for the Shipping Board simply for the 
work iipon this ship, or was it a general contract? 

Mr. Hague. It specifically mentions this ship. 

The Chairman. Now, the Leviathan was formerly what craft? 
What name ? 

Mr. Hague. The Vaterlandj of the Hamburg-American Line. 

The Chairman. And was one of the ships that was interned during 
the war and taken over ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In this contract who is specified or stipulated as 
the owner, the Fleet Corporation or the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Hague. If I may just refresh my recollection — this is the con- 
tract here. 

The Chairman. Certainly: I wish jou would do that. 

Mr. Hague. The United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet 
Corporation. 

The Chairman. How long has that craft been imder the jurisdic- 
tion of the Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Hague. The craft came under the jurisdiction of the Fleet 
Corporation on October 29, when she was delivered to the Fleet 
Corporation by the Navy Department, and on the 17th of December 
of last year it came under the jurisdiction of the International Mer- 
cantile marine. 

The Chairman. Through this contract ? 



SHIFPIKG BOABD OPBRATIOK8. 

Mr HAfjrK. Yen, sir. 

Tlio CiiAiKMAN. October 29, 1919, she was delivered by the Navy 

iVpArlmoiil ^ 

Mr llAniK. VoH, Hir. 

T\w Chaikman. To the Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Mao IK. Yos, sir. 

T\\v CiiAiKMAN. Did you have anythinfi: to do with preparing this 
rtMUriu*( with tho International Mercantile Marine? 

Mr. Macji K. Yes, sir. Judge Payne — the contract went under 
\\\H luituiH fiskod me to look over the contract, and asked me whether 
I «p|Uh>v<mI of it or not. 

•Plio CiiAiuMAN. That was after the contract was drafted ? 

Mr. IIacjuk. I was present when aU these phrases were drafted; 

\ tW HI 1*1 

' T\u^ riiAiKMAN. Was the contract drafted as the result of a recom- 
nuMulHtiori of vours, or was it drafted upon somebody else's recom* 
mondation and then submitted to you for approval? 

Mr. IIahi^k- We all sat in conference and discussed how this ship 
>\tuild bo liundled. 

Till* (*ii AIRMAN. As a result of the conference 

Mr. llA(»rE. As a matter of fact, I want to correct that a little, 
if I may. I <lid recommend that this contract should be entered into, 
bn( llH»n» wore several at the conference >*ho also recommended it. 

riu» ('irAiitMAN. Who was present at the conference that you can 
roiiiomber, Mr. Hague ? 

Mr. llAorE. Maj. Cushing, who was director of operations; Mr. 
Kninklin, of the International Mercantile Marine: Mr. Gibbs, of the 
|nl(»nwitional Mercantile Marine; one of the legal members attached 
to lh(» In ternational Mercantile Marine staff; Judge Pavne; one of 
our legiil advisers, and mvself. 

The Chairman. Was Mr. Rossiter there ? 

Mr. IfAorE. I think not. 

The Chairman. Will you state what the reasons were wliich 
promi)ted you to recommend the reconditioning of this craft to be 
wuulo through the procedure followed; namely, a contract with the 
International Mercantile Marine as agrent ? 

Mr. Hagi'e. Yes, sir. The Lematlian, which is the largest vessel 
in the world, presented to America the most difficult problem that 
has ever been put before the American Merchant Marine in the way 
of reconditioning. Xobody in this country, outside of the Interna- 
tional Mercantile Marine, had the experience in big ships that was 
HO necessary in a job of this magnitude. For the Government to 
liave gotten together the skilled force necessary, providing they could 
Iiave gotten them together— because, as you are aware, practicallv 
all the leading talent is engaged in or connected in some way or other 
with different enterprises— would have been an enormous expense, 
and we considered it a great waste of time. The International 
Mercantile Marine had the organization, had the experience, and were 
willing to undertake the venture. The contract was entered into in 
just the same way as if we were a business concern; that is, I looked 
at it from a business standpoint, the same as if a similar problem 
had been presented to the Standard Oil Co. That, briefly, is why the 
job was put up to them. 



SHIPPING BO ABD OPERATIONS. 1249 

The Chairman. Is the International Mercantile Marine an Amer- 
ican cinporation ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Incorporated under what laws ? 

Mr. Hague. The laws of New Jersey. 

The Chairman. How old a corporation is it, if you know ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know. 

The Chairman. Did y6u personally investigate the experience this 
corporation had had in problems of this character ? 

mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The OaAiRMAN. What other ships have they had experience in 
reconditioning ? 

Mr. Hague. They had had experience in the designing of all of 
their large steamers. Their reconditioning jobs had been the Kroon- 
land, the Firilandf the 8t Paul, and the St Louis — their late recondi- 
tioning jobs — the Mongolia and the Manchuria and the Philadelphia 
and Ivew York. 

The Chairman. They had reconditioned those ships, or they 
were 

Mr. Hague. In process of reconditioning; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So that you found this corporation, an American 
corporation, with the organization available and with the practical 
experience which in your judgment was sufficient for it to cope with 
this great problem ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you the plans of the ship, the Leviathan, the 
original plans upon which she was built ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know where they are? 

Mr. Hague. We have some of the general plans of the Lemathan, 
which we got from the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 

The Chairman. For the purposes of the record, I ask you if you 
could give when, where, and by whom the Leviathan was built — the 
Vaterland ? 

Mr. Hague. The Vaterland was built for the Hamburg-American 
Line; I have forgotten the date and the place. Mr. Franklin^s staff 
here have that thoroughly in their minds, if I may ask them. 

The Chairman. You may just make their answers your own, sir. 

Mr. Hague. The Vaterland was built in Hamburg in 1914 by Blohm 
& Voss Shipbuilding Co. 

The Chairman. Had she operated between this country and for- 
eim ports prior to her being interned or taken over ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do jrou know whether the Emergency Fleet Corpo- 
ration in taking this ship over from the Navy Department made any 
payment or settlement for it ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether any presidential proclama- 
tion turned this craft over to the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know. 

The Chairman. Do you know anything about how she happened 
to come into the possession of the United States — the legal proceed- 
ings? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 



^^jw SHIPPIKO BOABD OPBRATIONS. 

W t^ \iitMAK. I ^Afi asking you about the plans, Mr. Hague, and 
^ *ui«h' I think, that some of the plans you procured from the 
ii.x x^n^at Brooklyn? 

Mr lUuvR. Yes, sir. 

I'W t>i AIRMAN. Were they the original plans of the craft? 

VIr M \ovn. No, sir; they were plans that had been prepared by the 
\ \\ IVpartmont for their own use. The original plans we did not 
iJ^ iiud innild not locate. We cabled the builders to quote us a 

*.^ .VII A oomplote set of blue prints for that ship. As I remember, 
IvNiuoUMl us $1,000,000. 

tWt^*'"^''^^^^' *1;000,000 for a complete set of plans? 

Mt llua'K. Blue prints; yes, sir. 

VKt\ ruAiUMAN. Is that ship in this vicinity now? 

Mr n vm'K. Yos, sir; Pier 4, Hoboken. 

V\\\^ i'UAiUMAN. Could this committee see the craft? 

Mr Uaotk. I would recommend that the conmiittee see the craft. 

riu* i'HAiuMAN. How far is that from here? 

Mv llxni'K. Why, I should say it takes approximately half an 
K\^lu* to tf<* over in the tube to Hoboken, and then it is a few blocks 

rho C'liAiiiMAN. Have you a copy of the contract that was entered 

Mr ll.\<»rK. Yes, sir. 

I'ho (^iiAiuMAN. Could you submit that for the committee's use 
^\\\\ hHVo it marked, please? 

Mr. IIaoitk. Yes, sir. 

y\\{\ (^HAiKMAN. You will Want it returned to you later? 

Mr, IIaouk. No. I am preparing now a memorandum covering 
\\\\^ poifitH for your use, of which this is one of the exhibits; these 
luuht'ivling] are the others. The memorandum is not quite finished, 
lint will be this afternoon. 

*rii(» Chairman. Very well; please have the contract marked by the 
••toiH»^?nipher. 

(The contract referred to was marked "Exhibit R. L. H. No. 1," 
\\\\{\ Ih here printed in full, as follows:) 

Exhibit R. L. H. No. 1. 

Cotilrac'l made this 17th day of December, 1919, at the city of Wa8hington, D. C, 
|»\ luid between the International Mercantile Manne Co., a corporation organized 
\iiiiler the laws* of the State of hew Jersey , party of the first part (hereinafter called the 
rtlttMit ), and the United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, a cor- 
pniiition organized under the laws of the District of Columbia (representing the 
mv!ier of certain steamsliips and hereinafter called the owner), party of the second 
pBfl, witneeseth: 

I . The agent agrees to 8upervi«?e the preparation of plans and specifications for the 
reconstruction, repairing and outfitting of the steamer Leviathan as a first-class passen- 
^or carrier of the class and tj'pe existing prior to acquisition by the United States and 
to submit said plans to the owner for approval. 

Said plans and sjx^cifications shall belong to the owner. 

The agent agrees to submit, at the earliest possible date, an estimate of the cost of 
the work. 

j I . To secure the preparation of the plans and specifications and the performance 
of the work in accoraance there\*ith, the agent agrees: 

id) To contribute on its account, so far as may be necessary, the services and office 
expenses of its executive officers, including chief and assistant chief of construction, 
chief inspector, chief draftsman, superintendent engineer, marine superintendent, 
passenger and freight experts, \dctualing superintendent and other clencal assistants 
Aad^uch other members of agent's reguUir staff as may be mutually agreed on. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 1251 

(6) To ein]>loy for owner's account all additional necessary personnel re()uired ia 
connection with the work of maintenance of steamer during rehabilitation, including 
oflScers and crew. It may, with the approval of the owner's representative and lor 
owner's account, employ technical experts. Any person employed under this pro- 
\ision shall be discharged by the agent on the written request of the owner or his 
representative duly authorized for the purpose, but such action is not to be taken 
imtil aft^r hearing for cause stated before tne board of trustees. The owner's board 
•of trustees shall designate the owner's representative, who shall be authorized to ap- 
prove for the owner plans, specifications, contracts, purchases, etc. 

(r) To n^otiate and enter into all necessary contracts for the performance of the 
work and for the plans, materials, machinery, equipment, and supplies therefor, to 
procure all necessary permits and licenses and to obey and abide by all laws, regula- 
tions, and other, rules of the United States or of the State wherein work is done, or 
of any duly constituted public authority applying to such work. All contracts shall 
be in the name of the owner, and all purchases of the amount of $5,000 or over, and 
M contracts shall be subject to the approval of the owner. 

(rf) To exercise reasonable care in the employment of its own officials and servants 
and of the additional personnel to be engaged for owner's account, to examine and 
determine that all repairs, supplies, and materials will be in accordance with the 
plans and specifications, if any, applying to the same, and of first-class quality and 
workmauBhip. 

Inspection shall be made under the Buper\'iBion of the agent's construction depart- 
ment by inspectors employed for this purpose for owner's account. 

(r) To give the owner's representative access at all times to the work, including pre- 
liiniiiary plans and work and materials in process, whether or not on the vessel, and to 
give the owner full information as to the progress of the work, including monthly 
progress reports. 

III. All persons engaged on the work in pursuance of the foregoing provisions of 
this contract shall be deemed to be agents and servants of the owner and not of the 
agent, and the agent shall not be held responsible for the errors or negligence of any 
of the employees of the agent or those employed for the account of the owner. . 

The owner shall hold the agent harmless fiom and against all claims or liabilities 
of every kind and nature arising out of or in connection with the work, including the 
cost of defending any such claims. 

IV. It is agreed that the title to all materials, machinery, equipment, and supplies 
purchased by the agent for the owner and to all scrap ana salvage material ret^ufting 
irom this undertaking shall be in the owner. 

V. The owner shall keep books of account and control, and shall check all expendi- 
tures, including hours of labor. Bills and pay rolls shall be paid promptly by the 
owner, provided the same are also approved by the agent as to the prot>er character 
of the work done and quality of materials furnished. The agent shall furnish the 
owner with a duplicate of all records made by it in the creation of all obligations for 
the owner's account. 

VI. As compensation for the services to be performed by the agent, the owner 
agrees to pay tne agent the sum of $15,000 per month from the time of commencement 
of the services until the steamer goes on berth for loading. 

VII. The oiRTier agrees to assign the above-named vessel to the agent for operation 
and management for a period of five years from time vessel goes on berth for loading, 
on terms to be agreed upon, subject, however, to sale of the vessel at any time by the 
owner on 30 days' notice. In the event of contemplated sale, the agent shall have 
first option to purchase the vessel on equal terms. 

VIII. This contract shall not be transferred by the agent except with the prior 
written consent of the owner. No Member or Delegate to Congress or Resident Com- 
missioner shall be admitted to any part of this contract or to any benefits which may 
arise therefrom. 

In witness whereof, the parties have caused these presents to be executed in tripli- 
cate by their proper corporate oflicers and their corporate seals to be affixed on the 
day and year first above written. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 
By P. A. S. Franklin, President. 
United States Shipping Board 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
By John Barton Payne, Chairman. 
Attest: 

J. J. Flaherty. 

The Chairman. Have you the specifications, Mr. Hague, which 
were prepared under your direction * 



1252 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. The specifications were prepared under the 
direction of our agents, the International Mercantile Afarine, and we 
approved them. That was part of their contract — tiie prepara- 
tion of the plans and specifications necessary for securing bids. 

The Chairman. Have you got them there ? 

Mr. Hague. They are nere; yes, sir. 

The Chairman, l notice, without opening the bundle there, that 
you have at the bottom of that pile several olue prints ? 

Mr. Hague. They are blue prints to be taken in connection with 
specifications. 

The Chairman. Do they cover the entire work to be done 1 

Mr. Hague. In a general way. They cover it as much as any job 
of this size is covered in a preliminary set of blue prints. 

The Chairman. That is, there are further plans that will have to 
be prepared 1 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; the detailed working plans would have to be 
prepared. 

The Chairman. And will they be prepared before the contract is 
awarded ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. They will be prepared afterwards? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. That is customary in all jobs of this magni- 
tude, Mr. Chairman. You can not prepare a full set of details. This 
job is even a larger job than the construction of a new vessel. On 
the construction of a new vessel you prepare general specifications 
and general plans covering the construction to go with that specifi- 
cation, the d!etails to be worked out during the process of construc- 
tion. 

The Chairman. Now, these detailed plans that are later to be 
prepared, if the contract is awarded — will they first have to be ap- 
proved before the work can be done by vou 1 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; by our agents, tde International Mercantile 
Marine. 

The Chairman. But before the specifications were bu])mitted for 
inspection by prospective bidders the general plans and specifica- 
tions were first approved by you ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Were bids advertised for by the International 
Mercantile Marine, if you know ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not think so. 

The Chairman. Is there any dock in this vicinity of sufficient 
canacitv to take this craft ? 

Mr. ftAGt^:. By "dock" you mean a dry dock? 

The Chairman. Yes, sir. " 

Mr. Hagite. The dry dock at Boston is the only place in this 
country that I know where this craft can be dry docked — the only 
place on the east coast. 

The Chairman. Is there none around New York ? 

Mr. Hague. No. sir. When I said ''in this country'' I meant the 
east coast. There is a dock in San Francisco that would take this 
vessel. 

The Chairman. In this contract which was made with the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine — of course, the contract wiU speak for 
itself, but I am asking you now for your recollection and knowledge of 



SHIPFING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 1253 

it — ^was there any particular procedure to be followed as to how this 
work should be aone and where it should be, when it should be com- 
pleted, and how much the Fleet Corporation would allow for the 
work? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. The job was of such magnitude — ^I want to 
go back to the size of the job again — ^that it was impossible to give 
anything at the start but a wild guess. 

The (SiAiBMAN. Do you know of any other concern in this country 
that has had the experience and has tne force which could undertake 
this work? 

Mr. Hague. I do not. 

The Chairman. Is this work as it progresses to be subject to any 
inspection by Shipping Board officials s 

Mr. Hague. Yes, su*. 

The Chairman. The Shipping Board had never made any similar 
arrangement? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; only to a certain extent. On the Aeolus, the 
QdUio, the Martha WashiTigtonj and the Huron, after the plans had 
been prepared and the contract awarded there was a similar contract 
entered into with the firm to which the vessel had been allocated for 
supervision. That was the Munson Co., and the idea of that was, so 
that the operator would have the opportimity of fitting the vessel, as 
nearly as possible, according to his views, and that was another 
reason why the International Mercantile Marine Was recommended 
in the case of the Leovaikan; because in the operation of this ship, 
which none of us thought would be operated as a financial success, the 
people who would operate the ship, namely, the International Mer- 
cantile Marine, for they alone seemed to have the facilities, should be 
given every opportxmity of having that vessel fitted so as to be a 
serviceable instrument. 

The Chairman. Bids have been asked for from six or ei^ht different 
firms for this work by the International Mercantile Marine, have 
they not ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; bids have been asked for 

The CHAIRMAN (handing a paper to the witness) . If you wish to 
refresh your recollection, I wiU show you the letter which you 
addressed to me. 

Mr. Hague. From seven commercial firms and the Boston and 
New York Navy Yards. 

The Chairman. And when is the award to be made, if at all ? 

Mr. Hague. The award was to be made on the 15th. I do not 
know what effect this resolution — ^the bids were to be received on the 
15th, and would have been presented to the board the following week. 
The award would not have been made by the International Mercan- 
tile Marine without the approval of the Shipping Board itself. 

The Chairman. Now, Mr. Hague, in your opmion as Chief of the 
Division of Construction and Kepair, the method followed in recon- 
ditioning this giant liner was for the best interests of the United 
States « 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Why could not the Shipping Board or Fleet Corpo- 
ration have prepared specifications such as the International Mercan- 
tile Marine has prepared, and asked these same six or seven concerns 



1254 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

to submit bids for the work, and entered into contracts for the work 
under the same conditions ? 

Mr. Haoue. Neither myself nor any other employee had had the 
necessary experience in passenger ships to enable us to perform this 
work as quickly or as cheaply. 

The Chairman. And yet you are expected to inspect the work, are 
you not, as it progresses ? 

Mr. Hague. Only in a general way, to approve of the acts of the 
International Mercantile Marine's force. 

The Chairman. Well, are 3'ou not permitted to disapprove of 
them, too? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; approve or disapprove. 

The Chairman, xou will have to have some competent man to 
pass upon the work as it progresses ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Well, you will not submit that to an incompetent 
man, will you ? 

Mr. Hague. The force already engaged by the International 
Mercantile Marine for that work has met with our approval and 
practically act the same as our own inspectors. 

The Chairman. So that the men who will inspect this work will 
be members of the force of the agent ? 

Mr. Hague. They are practically members of our force, because 
they are paid by us, but they are under the direction of the agent 
here. 

The Chairman. They ore under the direction of the agent ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You had to assemble that force, I take it? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; the agent assembled that force as part of his 
obligation. 

The Chairman. You mean that the agent secured these inspectors 
to pass upon its own work, and that you approved of the choice of 
inspectors and had an understanding that whatever these inspectors 
should approve or disapprove you would stand behind them? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. You see, the agent does no work, except 
the object of the contract was to provide for the Government a super- 
visory force, and that is what the agent is doing. As agent they are 
doing our supervision. 

The Chairman. So that instead of your having a corps of inspectors 
working in your oiEce, you secured the International Mercantile 
Marine as the agent to do this work and to inspect the work, and to 
receive compensation for it? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Will you just read, for the purpose of the record, 
the names of the concerns that have been asked to submit bids ? 

Mr. Hague. The Morse Dry Dock Co. 

The Chairman. That is at New York ? 

Mr. Hague. That is over in Brooklyn; yes, sir. The Fletcher Co. ; 
they are in Hoboken. The Todd Shipbuilding Corporation; they are 
in both New York and Hoboken. The Bethlenem Shipbuilding 
Corporation; they have a number of individual plants; the nearest 
plants to here are Elizabethport and Fore River. The Newport 
News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. The New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation. The William Cramp & Son Ship & Engine Co. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPBBATIONS. 1255 

TheCHAiBMAN. You said there were two governmental agencies 
that had heen asked ? 

Mr. Hague. The Boston Navy Yard and the New York Navy 
Yard. 

The Chaibmak. You, as I understand it, have nothing to do with 
the award of this contract; it comes to the agent, and they determine 
who shall do the work. Is that it ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; the agent recommends who shall do the work,, 
and the Shipping Board itself will approve the awarding of the 
contract. 

TheCHAiBMAN. The contract will he with the agent, will it,, 
direct, or will it be with the Shipping Board? 

Mr. Hague. The contract will be with the Shipping Board. 

The Chaibman. Do you know if any of those concerns that you 
have named have done anv work of this character for the Inter* 
national Mercantile Marine ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chaibman. Which ones ? 

Mr. Hague. The Fletcher Co. 

The Chaibman. Where is that ? 

Mr. Hague. In Hoboken. The Todd Co. over at Brooklyn — ^you 
mean this restoration work ? 

Hie Chaibman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hague. Those are the only two I know of who have done 
work. 

The Chaibman. This contract also carries a provision whereby 
upon completion of the restoration work the vessel is to be turned 
over to (he International Mercantile Marine for operation ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chaibman. So that in addition to acting as agent for the 
owner and earning the compensations fixed in the contract for that 
work, the International Mercantile Marine would have an interest in 
having this work done so as to suit its purposes as an operator ? 

Mr. Hague. Correct. 

The Chaibman. And of course the better this work was done the 
better it would be for the International Mercantile Marine as operator ? 

Mr. Hague. In that respect I wish to add that, both from the 
Crovemment's viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the International 
Mercantile Marine as well, it was contemplated to restore the vessel 
to its original standard, because the Leviathan at that time was the 
highest standard of naval architecture we knew of. We had to run 
that vessel in competition with the British vessels out of the port of 
New York. The Germans for years had devoted themselves to 
meeting that competitive requirement, and the LeviatJian was the 
result. We all thought we could do no better than to follow out the 
standard established by the Germans and Uve up to it as nearly as 
we could. 

The Chaibman. So that it would be for the interest of the agent, 
the International Mercantile Marine, to restore that vessel as nearly 
as possible to what she was before being taken over for war purposes i 

Mr. Hague. Not only the agent but the Government as well. 

The Chaibman. Yes; but what I am getting at, Mr. Hague, is that 
there is nothing in this contract or arrangement which woiild hold 
out any inducement or invitation for the International Mercantile 



1256 SHIPPINO BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Marine to permit this work to be done in a slipshod or unsatisfactory 
manner? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; on the contrary, tiie highest standard is 
expected. 

The Chaibican. Do you know whether it is contemplated to put 
this vessel into a dry dock 1 

Mr. Hague. It is contemplated; yes, sir. There is quite a differ- 
ence of opinion as to whether or not we can get the vessel into the 
Eort of £k>ston — ^we think we can — ^not on account of the dry dock 
ut on account of the difficulties through the shallowness of the 
channel. 

The Chairman. Have you taken that matter up with the Navy 
Department ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chaibman. And they agree that the channel will permit the 
vesseFs being dry- docked? 

Mr. Hagub. les, sir. In fact, the Navy Department, providing 
thev get the work at Boston, have stated they will take the ve^3 
ana deliver it to Boston. They have that confidence in their port 
facilities there. 

The Chairman. Now, in preparing these specifications, Mr. Hague, 
did you consult with anybody outside of the Il^temational Mercantile 
Marme as to the phraseology or requirements 1 

Mr. IIague. No, sir — ^yes ; I want to correct that. These speci- 
fications, while prepared under the direction and by the force oi the 
International Mercantile Marine, are reallv the best efforts on the part 
of these various commercial concerns. If I may go back a little 

Tlie Chairman. I wish you would. 

Mr. Hague. There was a meeting held which the leading ship- 
builders of the country and the repair men who had had experience 
in work of this magnitude were asked to attend. This meetmg was 
held in Mr. Franklin's office. Mr. Franklin put the whole proposition 
before these gentlemen, and said, ''This is an American vessel. We 
are anxious now to make it a credit not to the Shipping Board or to 
the I. M. M., but to the entire American merchant marine." The 
entire matter was discussed in a very open manner. One of the 
exhibits which I mention in this letter is the minutes of this meeting. 

As a result of that meeting each of the shipyards, everyone at 
their own expense, began to secure the necessary data for preparing 
these specifications. They were divided up into general committees, 
and the work of preparing the specifications, while done under the 
jurisdiction of the International Mercantile Marine and by them, is 
really the result of the experience not only of their own force and their j 
own inspectors, but of groups furnished bj- these different shipyards ' 
who are to bid on the work. " | 

The CHAraMAX. Were they permitted to inspect the vessel ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So that at this meeting which you speak of the 
men competent to bid on this work, as I understand you, aweed to 
go over and look at the vessel and get a general idea of wnat was 
wanted and then assist the agent in drafting specifications which 
would embody the requirements that would later have to be included 
in the contract? 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1257 

Mr. Hague. It was not so much with that in view as giving the 
agent the benefit of the best experience and the best judgment that 
vras available in this country. The agent drew up his own require- 
ments and restrictions in accordance with his own experience and 
practice. In other words, the different shipbuilders (lid not have 
an opportunity of embodying, directly or indirectly, into those 
specincations something which later on they could use for their own 
selflih purposes. 

The Chairman. They did not? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. How was that guarded against? 

Mr. Hague. By the supervisory force oi the International Mer- 
cantile Marine — by the qualifications possessed in their naval 
architect. 

The Chairman. Would that arrangement in your opinion as the 
official of the Shipping Board permit any undue preference or favorit- 
ism being shown later when bids were asked for and you got to the 
awarding of the contract? 

Mr. EUgue. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. It would ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How has that been guarded against? 

Mr. Hague. The agent, while he would have the benefit of the 
experience of these various gentlemen, yet from his own experience 
in dealing with contractors and because he possessed the necessary 
qualifications in guarding his own interests against contractors 
would be able to accompli^ that. 

The Chairman.* Did you have anything to say or were you con- 
sulted iipon the matter who should be requested to submit bids ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And does this list which you have read include 
in your judgment all the firms in this locality which have a competent 
force to undertake this work? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether anv other firms have sought 
an opportunity to bid upon this work and been refused ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know that directly, but I have heard that 
one other firm has sought an opportunity to bid on this work, but 
thev have never come near this office. 

The Chairman. Has any work actually been done on recondition- 
ing under the contract upon this ship ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. There are two preliminary ships under way. 
On the Letnaihan it was our intention and is our intention to operate 
her with oil. There are a number of diflferent competitive oil-burning 
systems. There is some work going on now fitting up a boiler so that 
each of these leading oil systems will have an opportunity of running 
an actual test aboard the vessel so that we may then determine whicn 
is the best system to install. There is one other job going alon^ 
in the building of sample staterooms; installing aboard the vessel 
sample staterooms so that we will not merely know the plan by photo- 
graphs but will know by actually seeing just what is going into the 
ship before we go ahead and bmld and get out a lot of jomer work 
which might have to be altered later on. 

17706S— 20— PT 4 2 



1258 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

The Chairman. As to those sample staterooms which are being 
built, are they being built by the firms who have submitted propo- 
sitions for the work? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; they are being built on what are known as 
commercial rates. 

The Chairman. Well, now, will you just explain what you mean 
by that, Mr. Hague ? I do not understand that. 

Mr. Hague. There are two ways that repair work is generally done 
in the port of New York or in any other port: Where you can dis- 
tinctly specify and describe a certain work it is very easy to. secure 
competitive bids. That is the way that class of work is generally 
attended to.' There is another way in which repair work is taken care 
of, where the work is of a diversified nature and where it is hard to 
describe just what is to be done. In other words, as the development 
proceeds the work is done on what are called commercial rates. Com- 
mercial rates are rates in which the different shipyards charge a 
specific amount per hour. For example, for machinists, so much; 
for boilermakers, so much ; for joiners, so much. That is the way this 
prelimmary work is now going on on the Leviathan, 

The Chairman. These staterooms you say are sample staterooms? 

Mr. Hague. When they are approved they will stiU be used in the 
vessel. 

The Chairman. How many of those are being constructed? 

Mr. Hague. Two. 

The Chairman. And are they later to be the standard for the rest 
of the staterooms which will be constructed by the successful bidder? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Who is building them ? 

Mr. Hague. The staterooms are being built by joiners from 
Fletcher; and the preliminary oil-burning installation is being done, 
that is, the fitting of a boiler for oil and the arranging of the piping 
is being taken care of by Tietjen & Lang. 

The Chairman. Was it vour idea that this contract which was to 
be awarded should be so awarded as to include charges for extras ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you think the form of the proposal and the 
specifications guard against that? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; and judging from the complaints of the 
various bidders they think so, too. 

The Chairman. And it is asking for a lump-sum bid ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. To do all this reconditioning work? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; the idea being to have and know before the 
work is started the fixed price that it is going to cost us to put that 
vessel mto service. 

The Chairman.. What motive power, in the way of fuel, did the 
Leviathan have when it was tunied over to the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Hague. The Leviathan burned coal, the same motive power as 
at present. 

The Chairman. What is the idea of transferring that to oil ? 

Mr. Hague. The idea was to reduce to a minimum the operating 
expense. It is a very serious question with all steamship operators 
as to the possibility of operating the LeviaiJian as a financial success, 
and every means was and is being taken to reduce the operating 



SHTPFIKO BOABD OFERATTOHS. 1259 

expense to a minimum so that we will be able to run her in competi- 
tion with other nations. Oil offered that opportunity for the reason — 
well, for a number of reasons, and among tnem: On account of reduc- 
tion in fire room crew; on account of ease in bunkering; on account 
of its successful operation at sea; and also on account of this vital 
fact — in case our competitors on the other side should see fit to 
handicap us on bunkenng privileges we would be able by the use of 
oil to carry enough fuel when leaving America to get back to America. 

The Chairman. That change of system was one of the important 
features of the work ? 

Mr. Hague. It is one of the important features; yes, sir. 

The CHAIRMAN. Now, reverting to the call for bids: That will 
provide for a lump sum contract, as I understand it, to do the entire 
work ? That is, as to the staterooms, changing the fuel system 

Mr. Hague (interposing). Yes, sir. 

The Chairman (continuing). And restoring her, all to be included 
in one lump-sum contract. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Does that contract permit of subcontracts? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. In this contract the Government deals 
with one prime contractor. He is able to subcontract, providing the 
agent's approval is secured. But it is at the responsibility of the 
prime contractor, with the approval of our agent. 

The Chairman. How long nas this work been going on, such as 
preparing sample staterooms and getting designs for the oil-burning 
system ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know, but I would guess a couple of months. 

The Chairman. Has that been done directly by the agent? 

Mr. Hague. The agent, before thev proceeded with that work, 
«sked if we approved of what they had suggested, which we did. 

The Chairman. But it is under the supervision of the agent? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That they entered upon the arrangement upon 
commercial rates, etc. ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. At this point the committee will recess until 
4 o*clock p. m. in order that we may go over and take a view of the 
Leviathan, 

(Wheraifpon, at 11.35 o'clock a: m. the committee recessed mitil 
4 o'clock p. m.) 

AFTER RECESS. 

The committee resumed at 4 o'clock p. m., pursuant to recess. 
The Chairman. The committee will please come to order. Mr. 
Hague; will you please resume the stand. 

TESTIMOITT OF MB. BOBEET ITONS HAGUE— Besumed. 

The Chairman. Before we recessed, Mr. Hague, I tliink I was asking 
with reference to some work that had been done, and is being done, 
on the steamer Leviathan, in the nature of building sample state- 
rooms, which I miderstood you to say was done under an arrange- 
ment known as commercial rates ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 



1260 SHEPPmO BOARD OPEBATIOKS. 

The Chairman. Do you know how the particular firm was selected 
to do that work, which particular contractor, and why he was 
selected — a bidder ? 

Mr. Hague. The firm who was doing^the joiner work on the sample 
staterooms — the firm of Fletcher & Co. — ^was selected, I presume, 
on account of their being located in Hoboken, adjacent to the ship, 
and second, because they have had greater expenence in that class 
of work than probably any of the otner contractors engaged on the 
vessel. 

The Chairman. By greater experience, do you mean that they 
had devoted their activities chiefly to ioiner work ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; they have had considerable more experience 
in fancy joiner work than some of the other firms. The main 
reason in determining that Fletcher should go ahead with that phase 
of the game would be on account of their accessibility to the ship. 

The Chairman. Now, do the specifications provide that these sam- 
pie staterooms shall be constructed by the contractor at his own 
expense ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; these sample staterooms are provided at the 
expense of the Shipping Board as a model, or standard room, so that 
when the successful bidder gets the job he will have a guide. We 
are now paying — the Shipping Board through our agents are now 
paying — the cost of conditioning one of those staterooms and are 
installing the other. 

The Chairman. That is being done upon actual cost basis ? 

Mr. Hague. On commercial rate basis; that corresponds in com- 
mercial practices to what the principle of so-caUed cost plus work. 
In other words, we actually pay a nxed amount per day per man 
according to this — it is a graduated scale — ^whether a man is a boUer- 
maker or joiner or carpenter; it is a standard rate that the different 
yards charge. 

The Chairman. Now, >\ith reference to the oil burners which have 
been installed in one of the boilers for the test 

Mr. Hague. The firm presumably was selected first because it is 
also a firm with headquarters in Hoboken. The Tietgen & Lang 
have its shop in Hoboken, and more adjacent to the ship than one 
of our New York firms. 

The Chairman. Are they being paid for putting those oil burners 
in there? • v 

Mr. Hague. They are being paid for fitting the boiler for the test. 
There are certain changes made in the boiler to fit it for oil and to 
fit tanks for oil, which we are going to run a test on these boilers. 
Then each of the different firms — ^five in all — who have the successful 
commercial oil burner are to run a test on this vessel on this boiler. 

The Chairman. Before this was done, did it have to receive your 
approval ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, then, each of these five firms who manufac- 
ture oil burners will be paid for installing their particular 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. It is just to get the boiler ready, converted 
permanently from coal to oil to fit the pumps, the heatere, the supply 
tanks, etc., necessary for the test, and the separate changes to nt 
the boiler. For exaniple, from the White burner system or the Dahl 
or Peabody system will be borne by the contractor who is endeavor- 
ing to sell his system. 



SHIPPn^G BOAKD OPERATIONS. 1361 

The Chairman. So that the Lang people are bearing the expense 
of putting those burners in there ? 

Mr. Hague. No; the Tietgen & Lang we are paying to get the 
boilers ready for tests. 

The Chairman. For putting in fire brick and the fire parts ready 
for the oil-burner system. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You pay them for that ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And they put their burner in, and you try it and 
see how it works ^ . . . 

Mr. Hague. Yes; it is at their expense that they put their burner 
in. 

The Chairman. Then the burner is taken out and another firm 
installs their plants ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; at their expense. 

The Chairman. At their expense ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. With certain. machinery it is not contempleted 
it will require any interior changes in the fire part ? 

Mr. Hague. If they do, they do it at their own expense. We are 

getting a general sample plan ready, and we bear the expense of 

getting the installation ready. Then we notify the firm, who runs 

their own test at their own expense, how to make the necessary 

alterations. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether the Tietgen & Lang Co. 
18 a subsidiary of the Todd concern? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir- it is. 

The Chairman. And have you any written contract, or under- 
standing, with these various oil-burner concerns with reference to 
those 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; they all had representatives on this com- 
mittee which was formed, and laid down certain rules, how these 
different tests would be conducted. Each of the contestants^ as you 
might say, were part of this committee. They all covered m these 
minutes of which I have a copy. 

The Chairman. Have you a copy of any minutes? 

Mr. Hague. I have a copy of the minutes, which are ready to be 
submitted to you as exhibits. 

The Chairman. Very well, if you will submit those to the com- 
mittee, they will be marked. 

Mr. Hague. (Produces papers.) 

(The napers above referred to were received and marked Exhibits 
G and G 2 in evidence, and will be found at the end of this volume.) 

TTie Chairman. Now, Mr. Hague, eoing over the ship, the com- 
mittee saw a large number of men doing a great variety of work 
this morning. They were working on machinery; they were scrap- 
ing paint and scales off the hull; they were painting and cleaning 
up, and as I stated, a wide variety of work. Are those men em- 
ployed by any of these firms who are bidding for this work ? 

Mr. BfAGUE. I do not know the standing of some machinists 
to-day, whether they are working on some auxiliaries for Tietgen 
& Lang, or Fletcher Works. The bulk of the work is being done 



1262 SHIPPIKG BOABD OPBBATIOKS. 

by standby crew, which the International Mercantile Marine have 
placed aboard the ship. 

The Chairman. That is, the International Mercantile Marine has 
a crew which they maintain aboard that ship to do certain work) 

Mr. Hague, i es, sir. 

The Chaibman. Now, the bills for that are submitted to the 
Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Hague. Not only are bills submitted, but there is a monthly 
payroll submitted for our approval of each and every man, not only 
employed on the ship, but employed in the I. M. M. oflSce, who 

does not come under the terms of the contract. In addition 

• The Chairman. Just a moment. Does not come under the terms 
of the contract with the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And in addition? 

Mr. Hague. I was going on to say there is certain of the I. M. M. 
staff that are covered by the amount of money monthly, $15,000 
per month. 

The Chairman. Yos; give them to us. 

Mr. Hague. There are a large number of other men, inspectors, 
for example, captains, engineers, guards, sailors. Men of that 
description and calibi^r who are not on the pay roll of the I. M. M. 
They submit that monthly pay roll to us, we approve of it, and then 
it is paid in addition to tne $15,000 per month. 

The Chairman. Now, whether or not, Mr. Hague, the specifica- 
tions for these contracts for which things have been asked include 
within their scope this work that is now being done on the ship and 
has been in progress for some weeks. 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. The primary idea of having a force of men 
aboard that ship was to enable the specifications and the plans to 
be written up and determined upon m an exact manner. Nobody 
knew the extent of the repairs necessary on the electrical wiring. 
Nobody knew the extent of the repairs necessary on the plumbing, 
scuppers, ventilating systems. Beiore we could accurately describe 
what was to be done, we used these men to go over the entire ship 
from bow to stern and familiarize our agents with the actual con- 
ditions. We also satisfied ourselves as to the actual condition of 
the machinery — the main engines and auxiliaries, pumps, piping, 
etc., heaters, repairs of that nature — and so that in other words it 
is not duplication of the work that is covered in the specifications. 
It is a preliminary work necessary to prepare the specifications in an 
intelligent manner. 

The Chairman. For instance, in the stern of the vessel there are 
men engaged in taking off old paint, scraping the shell, and cleaning 
off the rust and dirt that is being paid for by the Fleet Corporation. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And being done under this arrangement with the 
agent, and the specifications will not call for that work to be done ? 

Mr. Hague. No; in that case the specifications would call for the 
work to be done. Yes; there is duplication to a minor extent there. 

The Chairman. In that case there is duplication. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1263 

The Chairman. So, that if the contractor — the succ^ful bidder — 
is awarded the contract, he will find under those circumstances 
tk&t work has already been done. 

Mr. Hague. I do not know the idea of just fitting the men in that 
particular place, but they went through — they started to overhaul 
the lifeboat equipment, and worked their way through the ship, 
and putting in shape necessary gear, and by necessary gear I mean 
boat falls, cranes, mechanical contrivances of that nature — why they 
should take the particular steps to paint, I do not know. 

The Chairman. How long has tnis work been in prograss ? 

Mr. Hague. Since the International Mercantile Marine took the 
ship over. 

The Chairman. That is in December ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Can you ascertain how much has been expended 
hy the Shipping Board for this class of work ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; the International Mercantile Marine have a 
fijiancial statement in which, at the end of every week, they can tell 
what has been spent, not only during that week, but during the 
preceding week, and our auditors check that. 

The Chairman. Now, is there any other work that you recall in 
which there might be duplication — that is, work that has been carried 
on during these weeks under this arrangement — ^whicli would also be 
included m the specifications ? 

Mr. Hague, ^o: there may be minor things, but I do not recall 
any. 

The Chairman. Has there been any general overhauling or repair- 
ing of the motive power ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes. sir; the motive power has been looked at, and is 
presumably in gooa shape. It was more a matter of examination to 
satisfy the iron men that things were in good orderly manner, and 
fit to operate, and what you mi^it say, it was repaired. 

The Chairman. Well, certain ajnounts of repaii*s have been made, 
have they not ? 

Mr. Hague. As you would open things up to look at them for 
examination, there are always mmor parts of the apparatus that have 
to be repaired. 

The Chairman. Now, how often did you get reports from the agent 
or the inspectors of the agent as to actual conditions of the machinery — 
for instance, when it is opened up to be examined ? 

Mr. Hague. We have not an actual report from the agent. The 
agent is responsible for the condition of the machinery, and he 
receives his own detailed report from his inspectors. 

The Chairman. But, do you not require some report as to the con- 
dition there, in order that you may be sure when yom^ specifications 
are finally submitted that they do not call for work which has already 
been done, and which if the successful bidder in undertaking the 
contract would not have to do. 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You do not do that ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You would rely upon the sound judgment of the 
agent in taking care of that feature with respect to the contract ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; that is what we are hiring him for. 



1264 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOHS. 

The Chairman. Now, Mr. Hague, have you any report or informa- 
tion as to whether it will be necessary, in orider to recondition that 
ship, to put her into dry dock ? 

Mr. Hague. To recondition that ship, it is essential that the vessel 
bdPore she goes on her trip be dry-docked; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That is your judgment ? 

Mr. Hague. That is my judgment. 

The Chairman. . n your judgment, will it be possible for most of 
the work, say, or a certain percentage of the worn, to be undertaken 
and carried to completion and the ship then put in dry dock t 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; the only dry-docking requirements that I 
know of are for cleaning and painting, testing the propellers, and 
cleaning and examining the sea valves. 

The Chairman. Sea valves ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes. 

The Chairman. Would it not also be necessary for the bearings or 
bushiners, or whatever you call them, on the shafting ? 

Mr. Hagi'E. They would be determined in the examination of the 
proi)clIer8. 

The (>iiairman. That would be included in that ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; the examination of the tail shafts is what they 
call it, Mr. Chairman. 

The (yii airman. Thanks; I did not know just the technical term. 
Do the specifications call for dry-docking ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Well, how can this work, then, meet your view of 
the nc^eds of the situation if dry-docking is not required? 

Mr. Hague. Because drv-docking is required. It may be im- 
poHHiblo - which J do not tnink— it may be impossible, but I do not 
think 80, to dry-dock the vessel in Boston, ana maybe without a lot 
of dnHlginp^. Boston is the only place on the eastern coast where 
the LeAyUdhan can be dry-docked. In case something happens that 
we can not dry-dock the LevuitJuin in Boston, there is nothing to 
prevent repairs to be completed to her where she lies, for example, 
and the vessel then dry-docked on the other side, as was done during 
the war. 

The Chairman. With respect to the wiring of the vessel, tearing 
out partitions, staterooms, ceilings, stanchions, floorings, and other 
structural work upon the various decks, did it require a change of 
the wiring system 'i 

Mr. Hague, it required a very close examination of the wiring 
system, and in the firerooms it has been decided that the wiring 
system will be installed in conformity with the necessity required 
by burning oil. 

The Chairman. So that there will be a change of sjrstem ? 

Mr. Hague. Some change. 

The Chairman. That is provided for in the specifications ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not understand so. 

The Chairman. Has any of that work been done already ? 

Mr. Hague. Not that 1 know of. 

The Chairman. Do you know just what change it will be? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; 1 might say, Mr. Chairman, that the complete 
detailed reports of the survey going into everything very, very care- 
^tiiy are on file and accessible in the office of our agent; but i never 



SHIPPING BOAKD OPERATIONS, 1265 

had the time to read and check those in detail. The agent has 
checked all that, and the agent's representative, Mr. Gibbs, the naval 
architect, is in a position to answer those questions in detail. 

The Chairman. I see. Now, if I understood you this morning^ 
you stated that the navy yard at Brooklyn had reconditioned some 
ships ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did they do that work — did they submit com- 
petitive bids against other concerns ? 

Mr. Hague. They did it in one instance; in the case of the CaUao. 
They furnished an estimate. It was also then competing with com- 
mercial concerns. In the case of the Martha Washington and in the 
case of the Moccasin we did not ask other commercial firms to figure 
on the job. We gave it to the navy yard direct. 

The Chairman. Well, those ships were, of course, smaller than the 
Ltetdathan. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. But, in your opinion, was the work w^hich they 
did upon those ships such as lead you to believe that the navy yard 
could handle the work on the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; handle it in a very satisfactory manner. 

The Chairman. And as economically as could be done through 
other arrangements, competitive bidding ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; that is my opinion. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether the navy yard, or the Navy 
ofiicials, were asked to undertake this work ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. By whom was the request made ? 

Mr. Hague. The request was made to the Navy Department in 
Washmgton. 

The &AIRMAN. By whom ? 

Mr. Hague. I can not swear to this, but going along the usual pro- 
cedure, as in other cases, that I happen to remember, it would be 
made in the course of events by the chairman in a written request to 
the Secretary of the Navy. 

The Chairman. Did you recommend that ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir! I do not know whether we have talked 
with the Navy Department. Now, whether in the case of the 
Leviathan there is an actual record of that I can not remember. In 
the other ships there is. We also sent plans and specifications to the 
Brooklyn Navy Yard, or the New York Navy Yard, rather, as well 
as to the Boston Navy Yard. 

The Chairman. When this ship was turned over to you, to the 
Shipping Board, from the Navy Department, was there any other 
propertv turned over with it ? 

Mr. IIague. There was propertj^ of such equipment as was aboard 
the ship, and belonging to the ship. 

The Chairman. Wefl, that was already on the ship ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In going through the ship we saw several of the 
saloons, or dining rooms, smoking room, large numbers of chairs and 
couches — ^were those aboard her when she was used by the Navy ? 

Mr. Hague. That is my understanding; yes, sir. 



1266 SHiFPUra boasd OPERAnoiTB. 

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SHIPPINQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 1267 

The Chaibman. Will that be put aboard from the pier or from the 
water ? 

Mr. Hague. Of course, that would be the successful contractor — 
would use his judgment about that. 

The Chairman. The specifications do not stipulate as to how this 
is to be done ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not think they do. 

The Chairman. Well, in your opinion would it make any difference 
of carrying out the contract to tne Shipping Board as to how that 
material should be put aboard there ? 

Mr. Hague. It would be far more preferable, in my opinion, to 
handle it over the dock, than by bargmg alongside, due to the con- 
gestion always prevalent in that slipway. 

The Chairman. In installing the tanks for oil, Mr. Hague, will it 
be necessary for any work to be done in connection with other 
installation which oan be thus done while the vessel is in dry dock ? 
Mr. Hague. The oil — the tank — ^no, sir. 

The Chairman. The specifications do not call for anything of that 
sort to the best of your recollection ? 

Mr. Hague. As 1 remember it, no. As a matter of fact, the test- 
ing — I do not want to say on both sides, but as a matter of fact, cotild 
the vessel be put in dry aock and the present tank tested and calked 
while on the dock, we would be apt to get a much more satisfactory 
and cheaper job than what we womd in taking a chance on everything 
being correct. 

The Chairman. It is your understanding that there is, or that there 
may be, or perhaps, I might say it might nave been, a real competi- 
tion between these several firms for this work. 
Mr. Hague. That was our hope, and that was my imderstanding. 
The Chairman. Now, then, assuming, Mr. Hague, that the success- 
ful bidder should be tne firm that had the least satisfactory oil- 
burning apparatus 

Mr. ELague. The specifications are so arranged that we could 
demand the successful, or rather the oil system which, in our opinion, 

proved more satisfactory on the tests 

The Chaibman. Well, you did not expect to have the tests all made 
before the contract was awarded ? 
Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Would not the oil-fuel installation be called sub- 
stantially part of the contract ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; the oil fuel installation is a very vital and sub- 
stantial part of the contract, but fitting the boilers with the indi- 
vidual system one way or another, whether, for example, a Peabody 
boiler, a Peabody burner front, or a White burner, or a White burner 
front, or a Dahl, or whatever it might be, in our opinion, there was 
not enough difference involved to make it either hard on the con- 
tractor or work a handicap against the Government. 

The Chairman. Now, tnese oil burners, are either of these types 
in use by the Navy ? 

Mr. IIague. I think the Schutte-Koerting and Peabody are in 
use by the Navy — ^I do not know. 
The Chaikman. Are they in use by any other steamship lines ? 
Mr. EUgue. Yes, sir. These five systems are most familiar and 
used the most in commercial practice. 



1268 SHIFPIKO BOABD OPERATIOKS. 

The Chairman. And the installation of it includes not only the 
fitting up of the 46 boiler fire parts, or whatever you call that place 

Mr. Hague. The boilers — ^furnaces. 

The Chairman. Installing the oil burning apparatus also the 
installation of the tanks with the necessary connections and pumps. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, that will be if they were to be done on a 
separate contract, which is a separate piece of work, it would be quite 
a substantial contract, and involve quite a considerable payment. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, can you explain how the bidder can make a 
bid for this reconditioning involving a transfer from coal burning to 
oil burning with the provision in the specifications that that type of 
burner should be used, which you, after the contract has been 
awarded, shall determine is the most satisfactory f 

Mr. Hague. The main part — the burner and the furnace fronts in 
a job of this magnitude, in the conversion of this magnitude, a 
conversion from coal to oil, are not anywheres near the value the 
other part of the apparatus is, for the apparatus is that all systems 
and all builders would have to estimate not alike. In other words, 
up to the furnace fronts, or up to the burner, practically all the con- 
. tractors would have an equal opportunity of estimating. Now, when 
it comes to the burners and the furnace fronts, there is not a great 
variation in prices between the different outfits. 

The Chairman. So, that the tanks, piping, and possibly the pumps, 
might be utilized for one type of furnace just as easily as for another? 

Mr. Hague. That was our intention ; yes. 

The Chairman. Now, something was said, I think this morning 
by you, or else by Mr. Gibbs, aboard the ship, about the tests being 
made, or expected to be made, of some tanks. Did I understana 
that ? 

Mr. Hague. I do not just understand the question. 

The Chairman. It is very possible I have got it confused vrith 
something else, but do I understand that you expect to install a 
particular type of oil tank and testing it, and see how it works ? 

Mr. Hague. No. If we have a test aboard the ship, a temporary 
tank, it will be simply for measuring the oil in an endeavor to check 
one individual burner against the other. I am not familiar "wdth the 
conversation. 

The Chairman. Well, I may have this confused with something 
else that was said. I assume that the specifications set forth the 
number and location of staterooms ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; the specifications, in conjunction with the 
plans. 

The Chairman. And also the furnishings ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you yourself, or your force, or to your knowl- 
edge, has the agent made any inspection or investigation as to what 
equipment in the way of furnishings is lacking ? 

Mr. Hague. The agent has a complete summary of what is needed, 
what is available, and what is to be purchased. 

The Chairman. Now, is it a fair assumption in your judgment, Mr. 
Hague, that when that ship was turned over, or interned, it had a full 
complement of furnishings and equipment ? 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOHS. 1269 

Mr. Hague. That is only a natural assumption, which I concur in; 
yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And whatever now is lacking has come as possibly 
the natural result of converting that craft for transport purposes ? 

Mr. Haotje. That is the natural assumption; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Anv questions, Mr. Kelley ? 

Mr. Hague, we will excuse you for a few moments. We would 
like Commander Crisp to answer a few questions. He is very anxious 
to get away, and if there is no objection we will call Mr. Hague later. 

TESTIMOHT OF LIETTT. GOHKANDER F. S. CRISP, BROOKLTV 

(HEW YOBK), VAVT YARD. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Before I start in, Mr. Chairman, I think 
I can throw some light on what equipment came out of the Leviathan 
i^hen she was converted into a troop transport. 

The Chairman. If you have any knowledge of what became of 
the equipment 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I have; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Does it invlove any matter which might require 
criminal action to be taken ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Well, if you will state what you know with 
reference to the equipment that was taken ofif the Leviathan we will 
bepleased. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. When the ex-German ships and other 
passenger vessels were taken over by the Government, the troop 
transports were jGltted out. A great many of them were decidedly 
lacking in equipment, and in fitting out these troop transports for 
officers, it was auite necessary to put in additional equipment. The 
Leviathan was tnoroughly equipped, and her equipment was used to 
a large extent, to my knowledge, to fit out 20 other ships. The 
material that came off the Leviathan^ although it was gaudy, was 
very cheap. The German-built furniture on that ship was extremely 
cheap, and that is the answer to the question of what became of the 
equipment. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether the Navy Department has 
the name of the ships upon which this equipment can be located ? 

Ldeut. Commander Crisp. I dare say thev have. 

The Chairman. What department would that come under ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. That would come under the Bureau of 
Supplies and Accounts. 

Tne Chairman. Who had charge of the actual transfer of this 
equipment ? 

Ldeut. Commander Crisp. The equipment was originally removed 
hy the Shipping Board, and I believe that they had the actual redis- 
tribution of it. 

The Chairman. Have you examined, in a general way, the specifi- 
cations which have been prepared for this work on the Leviathan j if 
you remember ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. In a general way, I have. 

The Celairman. Before I ask you about that, I would ask you 
what position do you hold in the Navy; what is your rank? 



i the 



1270 SHIPFINQ BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. My rank is lieutenant commander. 
Construction Corps, United States Navy. I am attache*! to the 
navy yard, Brooklyn, in the Conatmction Repair Department. 

Tiie Chairman. How long have you been in the Navy ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Eleven years. 

The Chairman. How long have you been in the Construction and 
Repair Division ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Five years. 

The Chairman. How long have you been at Brooklyn ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Three vears. 

The Chairman. To what particular duties are you now SAsignodT 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. At the present time I am assigned to 
the Hull Division as general work superintendent. My duties are the 
handling of the insi<le work for all work in the navy vard, excejit the 
new construction. I have charge of the plajuiing, estimating, 
drafting room, and all duties in connection with the inside oi^ani- 
zation and planning of work. 

The Chairman. Did you have anything to do with reconditioning 
the Martha Washington ^ 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The Moccasin 1 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The CaOao ? 

Lieut, Commander Crisp, Yes, sir. 

The Chairman, In a supervisjorv capacity ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chatrman. What particular branch of the work wa.s under 
your jurisdiction ( 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I handled all of the planning, scheduling 
of the work, and the purchase of material, and general supervision 
over all of the inside work. 

The Chairman. Purchasing the equipment and fitting*, and 
furnishing material? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman, Have you a force at the navy yard which, in your 
judgment, is capable of carrying through this work of reconditioning 
the Leviathan f 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. We have. 

The Chairman, How large a force have you over there which 
could be put upon this work '< 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. At the present time the total number of 
men employed by the navy yard is approximately 10,000. Of this 
number, at least 2,000 could be used in connection with work of thi» 
nature, if necessary. 

The Chairman. How many ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Two thousand. 

The Chairman. Well, would that be an ample force to undertake 
this worit? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How long wouW it take to turn this ship over 
before a voyage? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I should think from information that I 
have from specifications, the knowledge of the work to be done, that 
the minimum time would be at least eight months. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1271 

The Chairmax. Eight months ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You think you could do that work in eightrmonths 
at the navy yard with 2,000 men? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Would you have to take the ship up to the yard; 
could you get her up there ? 

Lieut. Conunander Crisp. We could not get the ship in the yard 
both on account of the draft of the ship and the height of the masts, 
which would not allow the ship to pass under the Brooklyn Bridge. 

The Chairman. Where coula you shift your organization so as to 
prosecute the work? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. It would be necessary to shift the 
organization to wherever the ship was located — that is, a large part 
of the organisation. 

The Chairman. Well, could you undertake it where the ship 
now is? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. We have undertaken work outside during 
the war. There has been no work done at the navy yard outside 
since the war period. 

The Chairman. Do you think you could undertake that work 
where the ship is now docked ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I think the navy yard could handle the 
work where the ship is now docked just as easily as any other con- 
cern could, who would necessarily have to handle it at that point. 

The Chairman. Are you familiar with the shops at the head of 
that pier? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Could they be used in connection with this work 
by the navy yard, if you transferred your forces ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. That would be practically of no use. 
Thejr have no facilities or capacity. The only work they could do 
is minor repair work. 

The Chairman. Then where would this work that could not be 
done there, because of their being only fitted for work of minor 
character, have to be done ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The shop w^ork, if the contract were 
given to the navy yard, would and could be done at the shops of 
the vard. 

The Chairman. With reference to the specification which you 
have examined, what have you to say as to trie completeness for the 
work of this character ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. In general I would say that they are 
the most complete specifications for work of this kind; that is, I 
mean commercial work, that I have seen gotten out in this port. 

The Chairman. And are you familiar with the specifications that 
have been prepared for commercial work ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I have seen quite a number of them; 
yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, did you have any part, by way of suggestion 
or advice, in preparing these ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I did not. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether or not anybody from the 
navy yard was consulted ? 



IJeut. Commander Cb 
The Chaieman. Had 
this morning in compan 
Lieut. Commander Cii 
The Chairman. How 
Lieut. Commander Cs 
The Chairman. Well 
docked there ^ 

Lieut. Commander C 

returned to that pier, I 

The Chairman. Did 

Leviathan prior to her 1 

the machinery or engine 

Lieut. Commander Ci 

pairs to the Leviathan. 

repair yards, under the i 

The Chairman. Did t 

Lieut. Commander C 

under the Navy contrac 

The Chairman. Whei 

Lieut. Commander Ci 

Leviathan was done in 

by Tietjen & Lang Dry 

waa handled bv W. & 

"Works. 

The Chairman. Do y 

chinerj' was left in by it 

Lieut. Commander Ch 

The Chairman. Yes, ; 

Lieut. Commander Ce 

The Chairman. Is it 

Lieut. Commander Cfl 

The Chairman. And 

Lieut. Commander Ci 

course, are contracts for 

The Chairman. Was 

which were recondition! 

sary that the spedlicatit 

Lieut. Commander Vt 

both general and detail 

fications are, however, j 

of shipyards building ve 

less open to any pcrsoi 

given out indiscriminat 

mentioned. 

The Chairman. If yo 
attention to the paragr; 
judgment, will that Ian, 
performed and paid for 
Lieut. Commander Cb 
far as I know, it is the u 
when contracts are awi 
tract would prevent ext 
refuses any extras, and i 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1278 

The Chairman. Well, of course, that contingency might arise 
tinder any form of contract ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know of any langui^e that you can put 
into contracts or specifications which, upon the happening of tnat 
contingency, will not require extra work ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. None, except that you might state that 
extras will not be allowed. In that case I should think where extras 
came up they simply would not be done. 

The Chairman. Have you examined this contract to ascertain if 
that, as a matter of fact, if that language is not written into the 
specification f 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Not in detail, no, sir. 

The Chairman. Assuming, Commander, that there are clauses in 
the specifications which would permit of extras, and that there is a 
clause in the contract which says that extras shall not be allowed, 
how will any successful contractor proceed, supposing he is awarded 
this contract, so that he may successfully maintain a claim for extras ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I should think he would have to submit 
a bid at such a price as to make absolutely certain that he had 
covered in detail not only what was specifically stated in the speci- 
fications, but what was clearly the intent of the specifications, and 
to do that he would have to necessarily bid — well, ne would have to 
submit his bid in such a way as to make absolutely certain that he 
had taken care of all possible contingencies. In other words, I 
should think he would have to increase his bid which he had made 
up on the detailed work by a certain percentage which his experience 
had shown him was necessary to take account of unforseen conditions 
which were clearly implied by the specifications though not specific- 
ally stated. 

The Chairman. Would that prime contractor put in a claim and 
.successfully contend that he was entitled to extras? 

Lieut. C)ommander Crisp. Not if his bid covered the intended 
items; and not as to the specifically stated items. 

The Chairman. If the a^ent should reserve the right to have 
repairs, alterations or additions made to the steamer which are not 
included in the specifications, that work to be performed by other 
contractors at any time, would that have any bearing in your judg- 
ment as to allowing a claim for extras ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. That in itself I do not think would 
allow a claim for extras except possibly for incidental work performed 
by the original contractor in connection with the work ordered done 
by the second contractor ? 

The Chairman. Might it not interfere with the contract work 
going on ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. It might, yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In the case of every allowance admitted at the 
agent's direction, assuming that there was a provision that they 
shall be permitted under the direction or with the approval of the 
agent, the allowance to be based on the market price of equipment 
and material unless the price is stated in the contract, would that 
permit any undue allowances to be made ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The same situation is handled by the 
Navy specifications in the same maimer as taken care of by the 

177068— 20— PT 4 3 



1274 SHXFPIHG BOABD OPSRATIOKS. 

Navy Board of Hull ChangeB, which passeB on eBiimateB either for 
an increase or a decrease in the contract price submitted for extras, 
and the decision of this Board of Hull Changes is binding on the 
contractor. In other words, if the contractor submits a bid for 
extras or for a decrease in the contract nrice, the amount of that 
increase or decrease is controlled absolutely by the Navy, or in the 
case of the ship, by the owners or agents. 

The Chaieman. Prom your observation of that ship — and I do 
not know but what I have asked you this question — ^before she can 
be reconditioned and turned over for voyage do you think it would 
be necessary to dry-dock herl 

Lieut. Commander Cbisp. It is not absolutely necessary to dry- 
dock her unless there is known to be items of repair on the ship's 
bottom, propellers, etc., or unless dry-docking is required by tiie 
classification societies. I should think an examination of the ship's 
bottom if dry-docking were impracticable, could be performed by 
divers in the same manner as was done prior to her departure from 
this country as a troop transport. The installation of oil fuel might 
reouire dry-docking. 

The Chairman. In what wav mi^ht that require dry-docking? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Ii the installation of tanks or bullmeads 
was required that made connection to the ship's side below water, dry- 
docking would be essential to make those connections. 

TTie Chairman. Do you mean in attaching to the hull or sheU of 
the vessel ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That could not be done by a diver? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether this ship could be taken 
through the Panama Canal ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. From investigations that the navy 
yard made during the war in regard to dry-docking the Levidthan, it 
was decided that the vessel could not dryniock at the Panama Canal 
on account of her draft. Whether the vessel could actually pass 
through the Panama Canal at her light draft I do not know. 

The Chairman. When you have occasion to call for bids for work 
to be done of this character or in connection with repairing ships, 
what procedure is followed ? Do you advertise or select a certain 
number of firms and ask for bids ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The yard, of course, never has occasion 
to advertise for repair work of this nature, but we, of course, advertise 
for certain items of material and subcontracting jobs for work being 
done in the navy yard. There is always an approved list of bidders 
maintained by tne Bureau of Supplies and Accounts to whom tenders 
are sent in the case of any work which is to be done and which is 
within the capacities of the approved list of bidders. 

The QaAiRMAN. Is that the custom followed when you do work on 
Shmping Board ships ? 

lieut. Commander Crisp. When we purchase material, do you 
mean? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Or award subcontracts ? 



"1 



SHIPFINQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 1275 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. When we purchase material for the 
Shipping Board's ships we send a* tender to every known satisfactory 
person who can possibly submit a bid on the material in question. 

The Chaibmak. Having examined the specifications, which I 
understand you have not done carefully or in detail, would you say 
that there are any clauses or requirements of so indefinite or vague a 
character as to preclude an intelligent or comprehensive bid for the 
work called for oy the specifications ? 

Ldeut. Commander Crisp. I believe that an intelligent bid can be 
submitted, 'but I also believe that this bid will necessarily vary 
between limits, depending on whether the bidder submits his bid for 
the items specificaUy stated or whether the intent of the specifica- 
tions as clearly unpued are bid on. 

The CoAiRMAN. Will you just explain that a little further, about 
the intent of the specifications? 

Ldeut. Commander Crisp. In the case of an old ship, or of a ship 
that has already been built, where it is necessary to rent, it is almost 
impossible in my opinion to detail specifically every single item of 
work that is to be done, and the specifications usually written covering 
this class of work state that the work is to be done, say, in accordance 
with the best commercial practice or in accordance with the approval 
of the person awarding tne contract. The painting of a bulkhead 
would DC a simple example where it can not be definitely decided 
whether the bulkhead must be scraped to the bare wood or whether 
the repiuntin^ may be done without scraping. Li the case of refinish- 
ing woodworK, it is quite impossible to state whether all woodwork 
is to be removed, and it is usually stated that all woodwork that is 
necessary shall be renewed. The person bidding on the clause in 
this contract would necessarily have to use his own judgment as to 
just how far the work should be renewed. 

The Chairman. Have you any other instances in mind outside of 
painting? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. In the case of overhauling plumbing 
or piping it is not usually possible to specify in detail just what 
sections of pipe or what particular valves are to be overhauled, and 
it is therefore customary to write in the specifications to cover only 
the general overhauling of such and such a svstem, such as a sanitary 
system. The person bidding will necessarily examine a number of 
sections of pipe, or a number of drain lines, and will base his bid on 
thegeneral condition of the ones which he actually examines. 

The Chairman. With reference to the entire work of reconditioning 
this steamer, in vour judgment is it better that it be done under one 
contract, to do tne whole work and restore her to her former condition 
as nearly as possible, or to have separate contracts, one for painting, 
and another for oil fuel installation, and another for plumbing, ana 
another for wiring, and another for furnishings, and another for 
general repairs ? Which plan in your judgment is the better one to 
follow ? 

lieut. Commander Crisp. I should think the one where the con- 
tract was awarded to one person, or to one contractor, would not only 
be the most economical but the most efficient. 

The Chairman. Would it also result in expedition ? 
lieut. Commander Crisp. In my opinion it would, absolutely. It 
would place the control of the work under one head, and one person 



1276 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

would be responsible. It would further tend to reduce overhead 
charges that would naturally be carried by the several contractors, 
whose work would interfere to a large extent, certainly. 

The Chairman. Would you recommend separate bids for furnish- 
ing, such as carpets, rugs, and gallev utensils f 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I should think that such items as port- 
able furniture, carpets, rugs, curtains, etc., could be handled just as 
economicaUv by a separate bid. In fact, any equipment that is not 
built into the ship and only requires placing aboard to complete its 
installation, could be handled in that way. 

The Chairman. Are you at work at the navy yard upon any 
Shipping Board ships at the present time ? 

Lieut. Conmiander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Which one ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The Moccasin. 

The Chairman. How long will it take you to complete her? That 
is, from the time when you oegan on it ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Approximately two months. 

The Chairman. How many men are you using on her ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. At the present time about 476 men. 

The Chairman. Any questions. Gov. Kelley ? 

Mr. Kelley. Is there any advantages that you would have in the 
Brooklyn yard in handling a contract of this kind over the Boston 
yard? 

Lieut. Conmiander Crisp. None, except that the New York yard 
is a much larger yard, has much larger capacities, and New York is a 
better labor and material market than Boston. 

Mr. Kelley. Has the Boston yard refitted any of these ships for 
the Shipping Board, or do you know ? 

Lieut. Conmiander Crisp. At the present time the George Wash- 
ington is in the Boston yard. The extent of the work done, or the 
work ordered to be done, I do not know. 

Mr. Kelley. As I recall the dock which would hold this ship at 
Boston is the Commonwealth Dock, which the Navy Department 
owns, but is situated some 2 miles away from the navy yard, as I 
understand. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. So far as I know, the Commonwealth 
Dock is quite a distance from the Boston Navy Yard. 

Mr. Kelley. It probably is as far from the Boston yard as this 
dock where the LeviaiTian is now from your yard ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I should think so; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. And would be handled probably with about relatively 
the same difficulty ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. How much would it cost to take the Leviathan to 
Boston ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I have not the slightest idea. 

Mr. Kelley. She would have to be fired up and a crew would have 
to be put on her. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes; and it would probably cost a good 
deal of money. 

Mr. Kelley. Can not you give any estimate at all as to what would 
be the cost. 



SHIFPIKQ BOABD OPBBATIONS. 1277 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. No, sir; I could not. Of course, it would 
necessanly depend upon the number of men she had on her, and the 
incidental expense oi moving her around New York by a tug, and the 
amount of coal consumed, and the expense of docking her at Boston. 
I am not familiar with these costs. 

Mr. Kellby. You have had a good deal of experience in the Navy, 
of course, with oil-burning ships ? 

Lieut. Conmiander Crisp. The Navy have; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. And the Shipping Board has nad a good deal of ex- 
perience also, has it^not ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. So far as I know, quite a number of their 
ships are oil-burning. 

Mr. Kelley. Dp y^ou know whether or not the various systems 
have been tried out in the Shipping Board ships, or has only one 
system been used ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. 1 do not know. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not know ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. No, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. How many systems has the Navy tried out ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The Navy has tried out and is trying out 
all the time new oil-burning systems. I am not familiar with the 
oil-burning systems used on boilers. The only part of oil burning 
that I come in contact with is the oil-burning galley equipment ranges. 

Mr. Kelley. Is there some particular reason why the five principal 
oil-burning systems should be tried out particularly for the Leviathan ? 

Lieut. (S)inmander Crisp. I do not fenow. 

Mr. Kelley. If those systems had been tried out on other ships 
by the Shipping Board I wondered if, as a matter of efficiency, it 
made a difference about the size of the ship ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. As far as my experience goes, which is 
very little with oil-burning ships, for battleships I think better 
results are required than for merchant vessels. ^Yhej do not alwavs 
get good results, and from that as a basis I should think it would be 
well to try out all oil-burning systems. 

Mr. Kelley. On every ship ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. No, sir; only until you get the best one. 

Mr. Kelley. Suppose you are building hundreds of ships, you 
would probably have decided, or rather would have tested all these 
five systems, wouldn't you ? 

Lieut. Commander CSiisp. But one installation will not necessarily 
fit on all ships. 

Mr. Kelley. How is that ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I should not think that an installation 
that is satisfactory on one ship would necessarily be satisfactory on 
another ship. 

Mr. Kelley. That was what I was getting at. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Oh, conditions are absolutely different. 

Mr. Bjelley. Is this Leviaihan so different from other ships 
because of her immense size, or something of that sort, that renders 
that necessary ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. It is not necessarily that, but her boilers, 
of course, are different from those installed in other ships. 

Mr. Kelley. That would be the reason ? 



1278 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I should think that would be one of the 
reasons. 

Mr. Kelley. And an oil-burning system might work differently 
on different kinds of boilers ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. And the boilers on the Leviathan are different from 
those in use on any of the Shipping Board ships ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. So far as I know, yes. 

Mr. Kelley. Would you subcontract any of this work if it were 
given to the Brooklyn Navy Yard ? • 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The amount of work that we would sub- 
contract would be the manufacture of certain articles of furniture, 
f particularly those that the navy yard could not economically manu- 
acture. 

Mr. Kelley. Could you do all the joining work over there? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. I think that is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. An y« questions, Mr. Connally? 

Mr. Connally. T would like to ask you a Question or two. Com- 
mander, you spoke about taking the Leinatnan to Boston. Is its 
draft such as that it could be docked over there all right ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. At Boston ? 

Mr. Connally. Yes. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The dry dock that was built at Boston, 
I understand, was designed for a draft sufficient to take the Leviaihan. 

Mr. Connally. That is what I wanted to know. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I believe the channel up there, however, 
silts up very rapidly, and it is a question whether that channel is 
deep enough at the present time. I do not know. 

Mr. Connally. I understood that there was no other point on the 
Atlantic coast, except Hoboken, where it could dock? 

Lieut. Commandef Crisp. As far as I know, that is correct, outside 
of Boston. 

Mr. Kelley. May I ask a question right there ? 

Mr. Connally. Certainly. 

Mr. Kelley. What particular class of workmen does this New 
York market supply that is needed on a ship of that kind which 
would be more difficult to obtain in Boston 1 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. As to the particular type, this market 
does not supply anyone, but as a whole New York is a much better 
labor center than Boston. In other words, there is only one out- 
side repair shipyard in Boston to my knowledge, or one large one 
and possibly one other small one, whereas in New York, of course, 
there are six or eight great ship repair yards. That nec^sarily 
means that the labor is here. 

Mr. Kelley. How about the more aesthetic types of work to be 
done inside, such as the hanging of tapestry and painting of various 
kinds ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. New York, of course, is the center of 
the country for that kind of work. 

Mr. Connally. Commander, you now have at the Brookljm Navy 
Yard an overhead oi^anization, or rather an organization capable of 
doing this work, I beheve you said, by reason of having done that 
kind of work ? 



SHDETINO BOARD OPERATIONS. 1279 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. Were this work turned over to the navy yard' at 
Brooklyn, or rather whether it is turned over or not, would that 
organization be maintained? In other words, is it likely you will 
continue to maintain such an organization as that ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. The organization which would handle 
the planning and scheduling and preparation for the work would not 
be changed. The working part of the organization, the number of 
mechanics, would necessarily depend upon the amount of work in 
the yard. 

Mx. CoNNALLY. Which would depend upon the number of men you 
needed; is that the idea? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. But the staff would be continued just the same ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. I beUeve that is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Mr. Hadley, do you wish to ask any questions ? 

Mr. Hadley. Commander, you stated, I believe, that this work 
coidd be done at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in eight months, accord- 
ing to the specifications as you xmders.tand them ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. That was a general statement. 

Afc. Hadley. The minimum time is eight months ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. That is reaUy the minimum; yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. You think it would be approximately that ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I do; yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. Having regard to the conditions attaching to the 
work and the nature of work as done in the navy yard and that 
which is contemplated imder the present arrangement, do you think 
you could do it as quickly or would it take longer ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Than outside, do you mean ? 

Mr, Hadley. Yes, sir. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I think we could do it as quickly. 

Mr. Hadley. Having regard to the conditions that attach at the 
nskvy yard and outside in this locality, could the navy yard do it as 
cheaply as outside, or would it cost more or less, in your judgment? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Considering the fact that the Navy yard 
does not have to consider profits 

Mr. Hadley (interposing). I meant to eUminate all element of 
profit. Put it on the oasis of cost. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. We could do it as cheaply. 

Mr. BLldley. I had that in mind in my question. 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. Is the work of your organization such that if you 
were allotted this additional work it would not interfere with your 
other requirements in the yard ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. At the present time, no. But we have 
no money under the naval appropriation, or practically none, and 
consequently our work is stopped lor the Navy. 

Mr. Hadley. What is the situation as to tne relative capacity of 
the organizations for the performance of work at the Boston yard 
and the Brooklyn yard ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I think the New York yard has about 
double the capacity of the Boston yard. That is only a general 
statement, ana I do not know specifically; but as to the number of 



1280 SHIPPING BOARD 0PBRATI0K8. 

men employed, I should think it was just about that, and that is the 
key, of course, as to the capacity of the. yards. 

Mr. Hadley. You spoke of there being a margin between the cost 
in accordance with the express terms of the specifications and the 
cost if the work is done in accordance with its implied terms, or you 
expressed yourself in words to that effect. Would that margin be 
wide or narrow? 

Lieut. Oommander Crisp. The mai^in could be very wide. I made 
that statement because it did not seem to me it was possible to specify 
in detail everything that would have to be done; that the real nnish- 
inff touches on the work necessarily had to be implied. 

Mr. IIadlry. What is the light draft of the Leviathan, if you 
know i 

Lmit. (Commander Crisp. The lightest draft at which I have 
<ivnr Hoiin the Leinathun was 31 feet forward and approximately 37 

tiH^i aft. 

Mr. Hadley. Do you know what draft is the capacity of the Pan- 
ama (Umali 

J>i<Hit. Commander Crisp. The maximum draft in the dock — as to 
tlin canal I do not know, but the maximum draft in the dock is 35 
f««t, and it was considered impossible, after an investigation by us 
during the war, to get the Leviathan to that draft. There were no 
nutans possible to get her lightened up to that extent without remov- 
ing, of course, a great deid of her permanent installation; engines, 
and things of that sort. 

Mr. IIadley. I believe that is all. 

The Chairman. You say in case this ship should be turned over 
to the Navy Department you have no money to undertake the work? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. In case it was turned over to the Navy 
we would perform the work chargeable to the ship as a charge against 
the Shipping Board. It would not be chargeable to me naval 
ajmropnation. 

The Chairman. Then you do not need any more money? 

Ijieut. Commander Crisp. Not for the Shipping Board work. 

ITie Chairman. You have got these 2,000 men that could be 
utilized for this work? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Would they be carried after the 1st of July, do 
you know ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Not unless we get money under the 
naval appropriation or ^et additional work for the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. If this ship were turned over to you under the 
same or a similar arrangement that obtained when you did work on 
the other Shipping Board vessels, you could keep your organization 
and secure the material and go ahead ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp, i es, sir. 

The Chairman. Even after the 1st of July? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You have stated, in reply to Gov. Kelley's ques- 
tion, that New York was the headquarters of certain skilled workmen, 
such as artists, decorators, etc, I assume, for the entire country. Is 
that because they start a new hotel here every six months or so and 
have to have artists and decorators ? 



-— 1 



SHIPPIKO BOARD OPERATIONS. 1281 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I do not know, sir. And I did not 
mean to exclude Philaddphia. Of course, the shipyards at Phila- 
delphia have some very skilled men, but outside of Philadelphia, 
New York is really the center of the shipbuilding and ship repair 
industry on the east coast of the United States. 

The Chairman. Assuming, Commander, that there is sufficient 
water in the channel in Boston to take tne Leviathan to dry dock, 
and it is found necessary to dry dock that vessel, in your judgment can 
a certain amount of work be done here and practically completed 
and the ship then be taken to Boston for the purpose of completing 
the work which requires dry docking? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Absolutely. 

The Chairman. And that could be done economically ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And more economically, I assume, if the entire 
work were done by the Navy than if it were awarded by contract to 
a private concern? 

Lfieut. Commander Crisp. That is my belief. 

The Chairman. Are you able to say from your examination of the 
specifications whether there is work required which will make it 
necessary to dry dock the vessel? 

Ldeut. Commander Crisp. I am not. 

The Chairman. Do you think it would be advantageous to dry 
dock the vessel in any event? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. I do. 

The Chairman. Is there a certain class of work which can be done 
by divers but can be done more economically and satisfactorily in a 
dry dock ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Any work that was done in a dry dock 
would be more economical than if done by divers. 

The Chairman. I think that is all, Commander. It mav be pos- 
sible that the committee may wish to call you again. If we send 
word, will you be able to get away ? 

Lieut. Commander Crisp. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. We thank you very much for coming over to-day 
and will let you know if we need you again. 

Mr. Hague, will you resume the stand, please? 

TESTIMOITT OF MB. BOBEBT XTOHS HAGITE— Besumed. 

Mr. Hague. The official letter which I surmised and could not 
swear to, written by the Chairman to the Navy Department, is in 
this file (exhibiting a bundle of papers). 

The Chairman, llave you a copy of it ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; this file is to be turned over to you as an 
exhibit. 

(The file was marked "R. L. Hague Exhibit D," and will be found 
at the end of this volume.) 

The Chairman. We wiU be glad to have it. Is the reply of the 
Navy Department there ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. There is also an intimation of the Navv 
Department, which might be of interest at this time, that the work 
not be done at the New York Navy Yard, that it be done at Boston. 
That is all in the various letters in this file. 



1282 SHIFPIKG BOARD OPRSATIOKB. 

The Chairman. The reason for that being that the docking facili- 
ties are better, or did it not state the reason? 

Mr. Haque. Yes; it goes into detail. 

The Chairman. We will be very glad to have those letters sub- 
mitted, Mr. Hague, and after the committee has had an opportunity 
to examine them they may desire to ask some questions either of you 
or of Mr. Gibbs or some of the other witnesses. 

Now, I was asking you this morning about a concern that in your 
judgment would be competent to undertake this work as the agent 
of the Shipping Board, and I think you stated it was your opinion 
that the International Mercantile Marine was the only one 1 

Mr. Hague. That is correct; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you take into consideration the American 
International ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; I took that into consideration. 

The Chairman. Is that a subsidiary corporation of the I. M. M., 
or the parent corporation? 

Mr. Hague. On, I did not take it into consideration as part of 
the same organization. 

The Chairman. You considered that a separate organization? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. jHow about that concern ? Do you think that is 
an organization which could — — 

Mr. Hague. As an organization, for example, judging by its work 
at Hog Island, I have the highest regard for it, out they would not 
in my opinion be anywhere as well smted or fitted for this particular 
job as the International Mercantile Marine, which is an operating 
ship company. 

The Chairman. The I. M. M. under the contract is to be paid 
$15,000 a month for acting as agent to accomplish the reconditioning 
of the LemUhani 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And in addition an arrangement is to be made 
to turn Over the vessel when completed for operation by the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Not as agent, not as operating agent, but as an 
independent operator ? 

Mr. Hague. As an operator, the working arrangement of which— 
the details would be worked out later on. 

The Chairman. And in the course of the sale of the vessel they 
are to be given equal opportunity to purchase ? 

Mr. Hague. They are to be given tne first opportunity. 

The Chairman. The first opportunity to purchase it ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is the Leviathan one of the vessels the sale of 
which was enjoined in certain legal proceedings ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you have anything to do with passing upon 
the bids for that vessel? 

Mr. Hague. I saw the bids. The passing on the bids was dis- 
tinctly a matter about which the commissioners were involved. 
It was right up to the Shipping Board itself. 

The Chairman. That went to the Shipping Board and not to you 
as a construction and repair official ? 



SHIPPING BOAKD OPBBATIOlSrS. 1288 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairican. And you were not called upon to pass upon it or 
approve it or make anjr suggestions ? 

Mr. Hague. They simply asked my opinion. 

The Chairman. If I recall correctly, Mr. Hague, you felt that 
under this arrangement wMch has been entered into with the I. M. M., 

Sroviding thev make a satisfactory bid which is accepted, the recon- 
itionin^ ougnt to take at least a year ? 

Mr. KUgue. Up to a year. 

The Chairman. Do you mean by that, that that is irrespective of 
which concern you got the award ? 

Mr. Hague. That is my belief; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Has the Shipping Board, if you know, a list of 
any equipment or properties which were turned over by the Navy 
Department to other ships which came from the Leviaihan ? 

Mr. Hague. Not that I know of. 

The Chairman. Have you ever heard of any such list as that ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether the Shipping Board has 
any list of property that was taken from the Leviaimn by the Army 
and turned over to other ships ? 

Mr. Hague. No; I know of no such list, sir. The only lists I am 
familiar with are the inventories which were made together with 
the agent when we took over the ship. 

The Chairman. Have you ever heard of any such list? 

Mr. Hague. I have heard of lists of ec[uipment, but all of our 
investigations proved useless in trying to pin down some definite list. 

Tlie Chairman. Does the proposal under which you have called 
for bids fix the time for the completion of this work ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there any bonus or premium oifered for com- 
pletion before a specified time ? 

Mr. Hague. Not that I remember. 

The Chairman. Is there any penalty imposed for delays after a 
certain date? 

Mr. Hague. I do not remember. 

The Chairman. And in the contract with the I. M. M. as a^ent is 
there any requirement as to when this ship is to be completed! 

Mr. liAGUE. No, sir. There is this, that the I. M. M. are as anxious 
to get that ship in service as we are, but in talking it over with the 
I. M. M. neither they nor ourselves thought it would be profitable to 
get the vessel in service before the next summer season. 

The Chairman. Do you recall this paragraph in the specification, 
Mr. Hague, headed '* Liquidated damages'': 

As time is the essence of this contract, it is agreed that the contractor shall pay as 
liquidated damages for each and every day of delay beyond the time stipulated m the 
contract the sum of 95,000. 

Mr. ELague. I do now; yes. 

The Chairman. Do jon know whether any time has been fixed by 
the contract within which the work shall be completed ? 

Mr. Hague. Not that I know of. The contract will state when he 
submits his proposal the number of days which he would require for 
completing tne wort 



j^2g4 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIOirS. 

The Chaibman. So that will be one of the elements taken into 
account by the ^ent in awarding this contract ? 

Mr. Haoub. xes, sir. . . , ^ 

The Chairman. And it might be that a contractor fixing a larger 

^^ i^ might be considered that thw should award the contract to 

him because he might stipulate a sufficiently shorter length of timet 

Mr. Haoue. Yes; that would be considered in the contract, pro- 
vided the delivery of the vessel would be such as required by the 
operator, the I. M. M. In other words, if they want the vessel the 
Ist of April and one contractor is able to deliver the vessel on or before 
that date, even though he quotes a higher figure^ figuring in the value 
of $5 000 a day, it might be a more acceptable ngure to the Shipping 

The Chairman. Do you know of any single transaction or piece of 
work if yo^ might call it either, which has been undertaken by the 
Shipping Board or the Fleet Corporation, confined to a single vessel, 
whion is at all comparable to this particular problem of reconditioning 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. This is not only the biggest reconditioning 
iob that America has experienced, but I feel it is safe to say that it is 
the largest job of its kind that has ever been contemplated in the 

world. 

The Chairman. With reference to the complexities of the problem. 

is it more or less involved than would be the construction of^a brana 

new vessel of exactly the sanae type? 

Mr. Hague. To my belief it is far more involved. 

The Chairman. Can you briefly give some reasons for that? 

Mr. Hague. Mainly due to the condition in which the ship was 
delivered to us, in our endurance of the ship. On any new construc- 
tion job it is a very easy matter to first conceive the idea, then put it 
on paper, and then develop exactly the actual construction plans for 
that vessel. On this Leviatkan there is a problem submitted to us, 
the largest vessel in the world, the condition of the details of which 
yife did not know and had to ascertain. The reconstruction of, say, 
this ship as compared with another Leviaihan would be far more, 
because we have oeen groping in the dark, where as in the develop- 
ment of a new design and the construction of a new ship you can 
proceed in a logical engineering manner step by step. 

The Chairman. Now then, why is it necessary to recondition her in 
the exact desi^ as to interior arrangement that obtained prior to her 
being disorganized, if that is the proper term ? 

I^r. Hague. For two reasons: The first reason, because to the 
people who have made a study of passenger vessels the LeviaihcMi 
represented perfection; that is, more or less. There are criticisms, 
but she was the finest thing afloat. Another reason was the mechani- 
Qol and structural problems that were already in existence on this 
ship. Ventilating aucts were run. Drains, scuppers, and plumbing 
openings were all in fixed locations. Wiring was laid in certain leads 
^th certain branches. The same thing applied to the feeder pipes. 
So that unless j^ou jimked everything that was there and just used 
the shell and failed to make use of any apparatus in the ship, you 
had to more or less follow the alleyways or bulkheads and the general 
arrangement that was in the original vessel. 



SHIPPIKQ BOABD OPEBATIONS. 1285 

The Chairman. And in your judgment is that more economical 
than proceeding to reconstruct staterooms and other facilities regard- 
less of the previous design ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; for two reasons: First, the fact that the 
Leviathan is the greatest passenger ship afloat and her design had been 
developed to the highest state of perfection ; and the second reason, 
the reason that I have just mentioned. 

The Chairman. In your judgment would you have been able to 
eflFect a sufficient saving if the Shipping Board had procured the 
original plans, even though it took $1,000,000 to get them? 

Mr. IlAOTJE. We would not have effected any saving whatsoever, 
because we would still have had to have taken — ^unless we scrapped 
everything in the ship and put in a complete installation, we would 
have had to take the pains oi finding out the actual condition of these 
various parts that are integral in a passenger ship — ^ventilation, 
plumbing, heating, wiring, etc. We woxild either have had to go to 
the trouble of making a survey of each of these individual items 
to satisfy ourselves as to their condition or we could have taken the 
original plans, scrapped everything, and duplicated them. To my 
mind the means that was taken is far more efficient, far less expensive, 
than the other. We have spent on this ship to date approximately 
$300,000, I would say, and we have got the plans and the specifica- 
tions ready to secure a bid. Now, even though we had paid a million 
dollars for these detailed plans from Germany, we would still have 
gone to the expense of making the survey as we have done now. 

The Chairman. Would you not have been able to submit specifi- 
cations more in detail and permitting less latitude to the agent, and 
less discretion ? 
Mr. Hague. I do not think so. 

The Chairman. Were you present at the conference when they sat 
down to consider this problem of the Leviathan ? 
Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. As I understand it, it was practically a conference 
to decide what was best to be done with this giant cratt ? 
Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And how we were going about it to have the work 
done and what work was to be done, how it was to be done, and 
where it was to be done? 

Mr. Hague. All that is clearly set forth in these minutes which 
arepart of our exhibits. 

The Chairman. In your judgment will the facilities of the con- 
tractor, assuming bids are received to do this work, be also con- 
sidered in determining who shall get the contract ? 

Mr. Hague. That would in my judgment be a very vital considera- 
tion. 
The Chairman. Mr. Connally, have you any questions ? 
Mr. CoNNALLY. I want to ask you one or two; yes. 
Mr. Hague, you say this is one of the ships that the Shipping 
Board was intending to sell, but for this litigation ? 
Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CoNNALLT. Was the I. M. M. a bidder for this boat ? 
Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 
Mr. Connally. A successful or unsuccessful bidder ? 



1386 gmPPIBQ BOABD OPBBATIOZTB. 

Mr. Hague. They were unsucoeflsful. ' 

Mr. CoNNALLY. I mean bv that it was not reported to whom the 
sale would have been made but for the litigation t 

Mr. Hague. No. As I remember the bid, they would have got 
the vessel. 

Mr. CoNKALLT. That is what I mean. They were eucceesful bid- 
ders so far as the bid was concerned, but they were stopped by this 
litigation. Is that right t 

Mr, Hague. Yes. 

Mr. Connally. Does the I. M. M. own any of these repair concans ) 

Mr. Hague. To my knowledge they have no interest in any of 
them. 

Mr, Connally. You mean 90 far as your knowledge goes 1 

Mr. Haox™. Yea, sir. 

Mr. Connally. You said awhile ago there was no limit in th* 
contract with the agent as to the time of it« extent ? 

Mr. Hague, Yes. The agent's contract aa our agent in the re- 
construction work ceases when the vessel goes to a loading dock, 
when she is ready to take cargo. 

Mr. Connally, There is no limit on it ? It does not expire in 12 
months or 15 months^ 

Mr. Hague, No, sir. 

Mr. Connally. And this company will get $15,000 a month until 
the ship ie reconditioned ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Connally. No matter how long that time might be? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Connally. And the only thing that would be a great incentive 
to the company to hurry the matter up would be that they would 
want to get the ship and operate it, in the belief that they would 
make more in that way than they would from this $15,000 a montht 

Mr. Hague. That was their main incL-ntive in acting as our agent 
to supervise the reconstruction of the vessel. 

Mr. Connally. Well, as 1 understand it, the extent of that con- 
tract is that they were simply to supervise and inspect the work for 
the Shipping Board. They do not do any of the work themselves f 

Mr. Hague, They do not do any actual work themselves, except 
they prepare the specifications and plans and do the creative work 
for the contractor. 

Mr. Connally. Now, on account of the draught of this vessel, 
when it does begin to be operated it wiH be restricted more or leea to 
being used 

Mr. Hague. At the port of New York. 

Mr. Connally. To New York and perhaps Hamburg or Liverpool t 

Mr. Hague, It was contemplated that the vessel would run in the 
New York-Southampton and Cherbourg service. 

Mr. Connally. I see; on account of those porta being among the 
few that are capable of taking her in ? 

Mr. Hague. Yea, sir. 

Mr, Connally. I believe that is all. 

The Chaikhan. Mr. Hadley, have you any questions ? 

Mr. Hadley. No; I think of nothing else. 

Mr. Kelley, Mr. Hague, when did you say you appointed the 
agent? 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOKS. 1287 

Mr. Haoxte. The date that the contract was signed was in De- 
cember some time. 

Mr. Kellet. About five months ago ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. Do you feel that they have made suitable progress 
since that time — satisfactory progress ? 

Mr. Hague. I feel they are to be congratulated; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. Do you mean it will take a year more or a year 
including those five months f 

Mr. I^ouE. I think it will take up to a year more; I think that is 
the maximum. I should say it would be some time, maybe, between 
10 months and a year. That is simply a guess on my part. 

Mr. Kellet. The Shipping Boara and the Navy Department co- 
operate pretty freely together, do they not, in handling these ships ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; we are very glad to have the Navy Depart- 
ment do our repairs. 

Mr. Kellet. Is it quite common for the Navy Department to 
assim a valuable officer to you ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. Did vou think of that in connection with having 
somebody to look after the Leviathan as being a proper way to 
handle it? 

Mr. Hague. Before it was contemplated that the I. M. M. would 
take it over and act as our agents we looked around to pick up an 
organization, and we had detailed to us, for example, the man who 
was chief engineer of the Leviathan^ who reconditioned the engine 
room and ran her for the two years, and he is now my assistant. 
We had several other gentlemen in mind to build up the organization, 
but to develop what was necessary to take care of a job of 3iis magni- 
tude it was simpler from our standpoint and also more economical 
to engage the I. Al. M. 

Mr. Kellet. As I understand, there were two compelling reasons 
why you engaged them; first, because they had a large number of 
ships of their own, and therefore were experienced in repairs and 
operating; and second, because they were going to have this ship 
to operate, and therefore the incentive would be to hurry it along? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. I think you answered Mr. Connally that you had 
satisfied yourself that neither the officers nor the corporation as a 
corporation had any special interest in the other refitting concerns 
in the locality? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. So that there was no reason why they should not 
be employed, so far as you could see ? 

Mr. Hague. There was none at all. 

Mr. Kellet. And you do not know of any reason now why they 
should not be employed % 

Mr. Hague. I do not. 

Mr. Kellet. And you are perfectly satisfied with the service 
which they have rendered ? 

Mr. Hague. I am^ sir. 

In reference to the oil burners, if you want me to bear a little on 
that 

Mr. Kellet. Yes, sir. 



1288 SHIPPING BOABD OFRRATIOirS. 

Mr. Hague. On the Shipping Board vessels we have most of those 
five systems in operation. The Leviathan presented a different 
problem. The Leviathan has water-tube boilers of a 8p.ecial type, 
and there is no other in an^ of our fleet similar to the Leviaikan^g 
boilers. She is such a big job and such an enormous engineering 
problem that the data we had acquired from the performance (h 
these systems on our car^o vessels was worthless wnen it came to 
trying to get any information and use it on the Leviathan, We would 
never think, for example, on the different sized caj^o vessels of 
running a series of tests to decide one burner against the other. 

iir. Kelley. If this work should go to a Government yard, have 
you any preference whether it should remain here or go to Boston f 

Mr. Hague. I have this preference, because I have dealt with the 
New York Navy Yard and know them and have seen their work, 
I do not know what Boston can do. 

Mr. Kelley. And they have an organization? 

Mr. Hague. And thev have an organization. 

Mr. Kelley. While tlie Boston yard has noti 

Mr. Hague. No ; I would not say that. 

Mr. Kelley. I mean for this particular kind of work? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know. I am more familiar with the New 
York Navy Yard than I am with the Boston Navy Yard, and that 
is why I should prefer the New York Navy Yard. 

ifr. Kelley. Do you know about how much it would cost you to 
take the Leviathan to Boston ? 

Mr. Hague. No; I do not. 

Mr. Kelley. Have you any idea? 

Mr. Hague. No; but our agents could tell you very closely. 

Mr. Kelley. Is there somebody in the room to whom you could 
appeal and find out? 

Mr. Hague. Yes ; I think Mr. Franklin could say. 

Mr. Franklin. I would not like to guess at that. I would rather 
have that worked out. I should say probably $60,000 or $50,000. 
We can easily work it out. 

Mr. Hague. We will work it out and let you know. 

Mr. Kelley. That is a matter of perfect calculation, of course? 

Mr. Franklin. I would not say it is perfect, but it could be a very 
close estimate. 

Mj. Kjsllby. Now, you know the usual profit, I suppose, that 
repair yards expect on work of this kind. About what would it be 
in percentage? 

Mr. Hague. I do not know on a job of this kind, because there \a 
so much of a risk between making money and losing money. I 
imagine that in this specific case the repair yards would Slow a much 
larger percentage for profit than they would in usued conditions. 
That is only human natiure. 

Mr. Kelley. That is, where the job is so large and so unusual and 
where men have not had experience with jobs of that size, then 
they do not take the risk ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. They put the risk into their bid and cover it if they 
can, so that thepercentages would be greater ? 

Mr. Hague. That would be the logical thing. 



SHIPPINO BOABD OPBBATIOKS. 1289 

Mr. Kellet. What would be the percentage on a job like the 
Martha Washingtonf 

Mr. Haoue. I should say if a repair yard got 10 per cent he would 
consider himself well repaid. 

Mr. Kellet. On this job it would probably be 15 per cent or 12J 
per cent ? 

Mr. Hague. You can only put yourself in the shoes of the other 
feljow; but I would say — well, it is only a guess anyway, sir. I 
would ^ess it would be between 10 and 20 per cent. 

Mr. Kelx.ey. I do not suppose you care to guess what the job 
really calls for in expenditure * 

Mr. Hague. To be honest, I have not any idea. 

Mr. Kellet. You do not know what it would cost ? 

Mjp. Hague; No. 

Mr. Ejbllet. Have any of yom* constructors figured on the cost of 
these repairs 1 

Mr. Hague. We have guessed at it — from seven to eight million 
dollars. 

Mr. Ejbllet. Do you think the navy yards can do the work as 
cheaply as any contractor would try to do it ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. EIellet. Then that would mean a saving of about a million 
dollars in their fee? 

Mr. Hague. You see, there is always a check on that, because, as 
has happened on several of our other ships, the Navy Department's 
estimate, with their skilled and trained corps estimating the cost, fur- 
nishes a base of comparison with the bids of the other competitive 
commercial concerns. In the case of the GaUao the navy yard's esti- 
mate was much lower. They got the job, and they ran quite a num- 
ber of thousand dollars under the origmal estimate. 

Mr. Kellet. Their estimates are always on a basis of actual cost ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. They do not have a profit or claim anything in their 
costs for overhead ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

Mr. E^LLET. So that the estimate which they would make prob- 
ably would be under tiie contract price that you would enter into 
with outside parties 1 

Mr. Hague. That is what we would expect. 

Mr. Kellet. So there would be probably at least a miUion dollars 
saved if you let the navy yard have it ? 

Mr. Hague. Well, we can determine that when* the proposals are 
opened. 

Mr. Kellet. So, even if it did go to Boston, the $50,000 it would 
take to get her there would not enter into it? 

Mr. m^GUE. I do not think so; no, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. That is all, Mr. Hague. 

The Chairman. Mr. Hague, as the official in charge of construc- 
tion and repair, have you personally received any complaints from 
any yards in this vicinity of not havmg had an opportunity to bid on 
this work % 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

177068— 20— PT 4 4 



1290 SHIFFIKa BOASD 0FBRAXI0K8. 

The Chaikman. Do you know of any other yards in this vicinity 
that are sufficiently equipped to undertake the work ? 

Mr. Hague. In my opmion there is no other yard sufficiently 
equipped to undertake work of this magnitude. 

The Chairman. Were any other yards discussed at these meet- 
ings? 

Air. Hague. No. sir. 

The Chairman. Is there a yard here known as the Shewan Co. ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Has that yard done anv work for the Shipping 
Board ? 

Mr. Hague. They do a great deal of work for the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. What character of work ? 

Mr. Hague. General overhauling and repairs. 

The Chairman. Is that in the New York Harbor zone ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; it is over on the Brooklyn side. 

The Chairman. Did you ever hear that they asked for an oppor- 
tunity to submit a bid and were refused ? 

Mr. Hague. I have heard it rumored they were looking for an 
opportunity to get a bid. I also heard it said that their representa- 
tive admitted to this party that they could not actually do the work. 

The Chairman. Have they a number of docks ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And is there a sufficient depth of water there to 
tic up the Leviatlian ( 

Mr. Hague. To my knowledge, no, sir — I mean, to the best of my 
knowhulge. 

The Chairman. You stated that you would be unable to deter- 
min(? until the bids were secured, if vou secure any, just about what 
Having you could effect if the Navy t)epartment could be induced to 
undertake this work either at Brooklyn or at Boston. That Ls what 
I understood you to say ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. I think there would be a saving, but I 
would not even want to guess at the amoimt of the saving. 

The Chairman. If the Navy Department could be induced to 
tjndertake this work at Brooklyn, for instance, with the provision 
that if dry docking were necessary it could be done at Boston at the 
appropriate time during the progress of the work, would you think 
tiiat it would be the part of wisdom to defer the question of awarding 
the contract, even though you got what you considered to be satis- 
factory bids, until you procureafigures from the Navy Department. 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. Personally I would rather see the job done 
at a navy yard than at a commercial yard. Wo get better workman- 
ship. 

The Chairman. You heard the commander state that in his 
judgment, without attempting to commit the Department to a 
certain time, it might be done within eight months. Do you think 
that under the specifications which you nave issued in your call for 
bids any of these contractors would be able to do it in that time? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, can you furnish the committee, Mr. Hague, 
a financial statement showing payments by the Shipping Board on 
accoimt of the Leviathan since sne came into the control of the board 
and up to approximately recent date ? 



^taHBfl 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIOKS. 1291 

Mr. Hague. I can not right away; that is being prepared by our 
comptroller. 

The Chairman. It is being prepared for ns ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; I expect to present it to you to-morrow 
morning. 

The Chairman. Do you have to pass on these payments before 
they are approved by the auditing department ? 

Mr. Hague. The power of passing on the payrolls, etc., has been 
delegated to Commander Woodward, my assistant. 

The Chairman. It goes through your office ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir; and he in turn always takes it up with me 
and shows me the expenditure before he signs it. 

The Chauiman. Have any of these other ships that have been 
reconditioned by the navy yard been turned over to the I. M. M. for 
operation ? 

Mr. Hague. Xo, sir. 

The Chairman. Do vou know whether it is in contemplation 
that any of them shall be turned over to that concern ? 

Mr. Hague. Xot that I know of; because I do not know the 
policy of the board about allocating passenger ships. 

The Chairman. Oh, that is a Shippmg Board matter? 

Mr. Hague. That is a Shipping Board matter. 

The Chairman. And not under your supervision ? Xow, with 
reference to the Shewan yard, do you know of any particular reason, 
personally I mean, why if they ask an opportunity to bid upon this 
work they should not be given it ? 

Mr. Hague. Xo; I know of no particular reason. The Shewan 
yard has done very satisfactorv' work, and has done a very great 
Heal of work for the Shipping Board. In a job of this kind, before 
giving a firm a chance to bid that you do not think is qualified — I 
mean, it is rather a serious question whether you want to give, on a 
Grovernment contract, an opportunity to bid to a firm you do not 
think has the proper organization, and that is not meant in any 
way detrimental to their organization, because if you do give 
them a chance to bid, and they are the low bidders, then they are 
entitled to it. The time to draw the restriction is before you give 
out the specifications. In my experience in awarding a lot of these 
jobs, both on main contracts and on subcontracts, in the construc- 
tion at Philadelphia it frequently has happened that a firm who has 
not the qualifications both as regards the personnel and as regards 
equipment has been given an opportunity to bid on some Govern- 
ment work and has proven itself tne lowest bidder. Then you have 
got to give them the contract and it has created all sorts of trouble 
to try to make them live up to it. That is simply the attitude that 
I would assume in connection with the Shewan case had it been 
put up to me. 

The Chairman. As you understand it, this matter was broached 
somewhat after this fashion: The Shipping Board or the respon- 
sible officials first determined that thi^ work should be done. Then 
you took into consideration the private concerns which in the judg- 
ment of the officials had adequate facilities, proper organization, 
and were sufficiently responsible to undertake the work, and after 
giving that question consideration and determining who those con- 
cerns were, they were invited to submit bids. And, further, you 



1292 SHIPPING BOARD OPBRATIOKS. 

took into consideration the availability of the Navy Department, 
both here and at Boston, and they were requested to submit proposals 
for the work ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And after that was done these specifications 
were submitted to these concerns, and you are now awaiting their 
action and bids for the work ? 

Mr. Hahue. Yes, sir. We contemplated that they would submit 
their bids on the 15th of this month. 

The Chairman. While I stated that broadly and generally, I 
assume that the minutes which you have submitted oi these con- 
ferences will show just the cons^deration that was given and the 
conclusions that were reached touching those problems ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Of course, it would be rather a useless pro- 
ceeding, I assume, to determine upon this work, prepare vour 
specifications, and then put an advertisement in the papers calling 
ifor bids and distributing the specifications to every applicant? 

Mr. Hague. We consider a job of this importance should be ne- 
gotiated with only responsible people, and 1 mean by that respon- 
sible in every way; not simply financially responsible, or morally 
responsible, but their organization, personnel, and equipment are all 
matters that must be taken into consideration. This Leviathan 
matter was handled just the same way that any big business prop- 
osition of this kind would be handled. 

The Chairman. Do you think that if the Leviathan were owned 
by the I. M. M., and at the time they acquired the ownership it be- 
came necessary to do this work of reconditioning, possibly this same 
course would have been followed ? 

Mr. Hague. I do; I think the I. M. M. in this matter acted exactly 
as if they had owned the vessel themselves. 

The Chairman. And in acting as the agent of the Shipping Board 
they wUl follow the same course as if they were the actual owner 
rather than becoming the operator, perhaps after the work is com- 
pleted ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you think the cost for supervision is a proper 
one? 

Mr. Hague. I do. I might add that the cost for supervision is 
much less than what the International Mercantile Marine thought 
they were entitled to on their first proposition. 

The Chairman. Of course, the cost of supervision is linked up in 
the contract with the agreement that it is to be turned over to them 
as the operator ? 

Mr. Hague. That was one of the inducements that the Shipping 
Board offered to the I. M. M. in assuming this responsibility. 

The Chairman. And the further inducement that if the court may 
at some time permit this craft to be sold, they are to have the first 
opportunity to purchase, on 30 days' notice ? 

Mr. Hague, i es, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, can you show in this arrangement any in- 
ducement for your agent, the I. M. M., to prolong the existence of 
their contract as agent ? 



^^'- 



SHTPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1293 

Mr. Hague. No; I can not. Besides, before we went into it we 
established to our satisfaction the reliability of the I. M. M., and we 
have all confidence in them. 

The Chairman. Do you know how old a concern that is? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you personally make an investigation as to 
their reliability and responsibility ? 

Mr. Hague. No; I did not, except as to the reliability and respon- 
sibility of their construction and operating organization. That is 
as far as I was concerned in my dealings with them. 

The Chairman. And that, as you have already testified, was 
eminently satisfactory ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I have nothing further. 

Mr. Hadley. I have one or two questions. Does this contract, 
which contemplates the operation of the vessel subsequent to its 
reconditioning, by the International Mercantile Marine, provide a 
time limit ? 

Mr. Hague. Five years. 

Mr. Hadley. Does it also set forth the terms and conditions under 
which it is to be operated ? 

Mr. Hague. No; the details of that, I understand, are to be mu- 
tually aCTeed upon later on ; it has not been entered into. 

Mr. Hadley. There is then a general covenant in the contract 
that that is to be amplified by mutual agreement subsequently? 

Mr. Hague. That is my unaerstanding. 

Mr. Hadley. But there is a 5-year limit ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. I infer from your statement that you have not deter- 
mined the policy as to reconditioning the vessel, but merely have 
acted as the representative in executing the policy? 

Mr. Hague. Well, we had an opportunity to determine the policy 
in the nature of the reconditioning. I do not just follow your question. 

Mr. Hadley. I had reference to the question whether it was pos- 
sible to proceed and recondition this vessel having regard to the cost 
and the returns that might come from it subsequently, or whether it 
was best to take some other course. Did you have to do with deter- 
mining that poUcy ? 

Mr. Hague. No; the board determined that policy. 

Mr. Hadley. I assumed that was the case. Do you mean the board 
of the Emergency Fleet Corporation, or the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Hague. I mean the Shipping Board. 

Mr. Hadley. So the policy was determined by the United States 
ShippLog Board ? 

3ilr. ILiGUE. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. Was that determined upon prior to the proposed sale 
that was referred to a while ago ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. What gave rise to the question of sale after deter- 
mining on the policy of reconditioning ? 

Mr. Hague. Of course, that is for the board to answer; I do not 
know. 

Mr. Hadley. I see. I realize that on second thought, and I would 
not insist upon it if you did know. That is all. 



1294 SHIPPING BOABD OPSRATIOHS. 

Mr. Kelley. I have just one other question. In case the work 
should be done at the Navy Yard or under the direction of the Navy, 
under the terms of the contract with the agent will it be necessary to 
pay the $120,000 for the eight months? 

Mr. Hague. I should say it would be very advisable to pay it. 

Mr. Kelley. They would still act as the agent for the Shipping 
Board between you and the Navy? 

Mr. Hague. Yes; and they would work in cooperation with the 
Navy. Where we are conditioning passenger vessels at navy yards 
our entire organization works very closely with the Navy Depart- 
ment, because there are a great many things due to the fact that they 
are not naval vessels — those questions have got to be decided by 
ourselves, and even on the vessels at the navy yard we have quite an 
organization. 

Mr. Kelley. Do you feel that on a ship of this size the experience 
of the agent would be necessary ? 

Mr. HuiGUE. I feel it would be very necessary; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. To do the very best work in the matter of reinstating 
the ship in its former situation ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kj^lley. Suppose that in the first instance the navy yard had 
undertaken the work; you would not have hired the a^ent, would you? 

Mr. Hague. I would still have recommended the hiring of an ex- 
perienced agent. 

Mr. Kelley. But now that they have ^one ahead and prepared the 
plans and supervised the work up to this point, you do not think it 
would be advisable in any event to disturb them? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir; I think that on a job of this magnitude the 
$120,000 does not amount to anything in comparison with the success- 
ful finishing of the vessel. 

Mr. Kelley. In any event, the contract calls for it, so that you 
could not get out of it if you wanted to, could you ? 

Mr. Hague. I had not thought of it that way. 

Mr. Kjelley. I know, but I say you made the contract without 
making any reservation ? 

Mr. Hague. That is the way the contract is made; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. That is all. 

The Chairman. I just want to ask one further question, Mr. Hague, 
if you will pardon me. Are you satisfied, as the Shipping Board offi- 
cial haying charge of construction and repair work, tnat these specifi- 
cationa are so framed that all the work that has been done on the 
LeviatJian up to the present time is not work that will be bid upon by 
the contractor, and lor which he will receive payment, although the 
work has been done by other parties and paid for by the Shipping 
Board ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. The slight overlapping, if there is any, I do 
not consider amounts to anything to speak of, but I am going to look 
into it so I wiU be able to answer you to-morrow on that. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. Right in that connection, would it not be a part 
of the duty of the agent to see that that kind of thing did not happen ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. It is on the job and has got its inspectors there, 
and would not be a breach of its duty if it permitted the Shipping 
Board to pay twice for the same work ? 



SBIPPINQ BOARD OPBRATIOKS. 1296 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Is there any uncertainty in the specifications as to 
the location of the bulkheads or the number ? 

Mr. Hague. There is yet, I would say, an uncertainty as to the 
actual location, maybe, of some of the bulkheads in the fuel oil 
installation. I am not sufficiently familiar with that in detail; 
there may be. 

Mr. Kellet. But not enough to make any material difference in 
the price of the work? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. That is something that Mr. Gibbs could 
answer in detail. 

The Chaerman. I think that is all Mr. Hague, at the present 
time. Thank you. I think we will adjourn and try to start to- 
morrow morning at 9.45. I have told several gentlemen to be here 
at 10 o'clock, but we will ask Mr. Franklin to oe here at a quarter 
to 10 if possible. 

Mr. Franklin. I will be very glad to be here, sir. 

The Chahiman. The committee will stand adjourned \mtil 9.45 
o'clock tomorrow morning. 

(Thereupon, at 7.40 o^lock p. m., the committee adjourned to 
meet at 9.45 o'clock a. m. tomorrow, Tuesday, May 11th, 1920.) 



Select CoMMrrrEE on 
United States Shipping Board Operations, 

House of Representatives, 
New York CUy, Tuesday ^ May 11, 1920. 

The committee met at 9.45 o'clock a. m., in room 804 of the offices 
of the United States Shipping Board, at 45 Broadway, New York 
City, Hon. Joseph Walsh (chairman) presiding. 

Present also: Representatives P. H. Kelley, L. H. Hadley, H. J. 
Steele and Tom Connally. 

TESTIMOVY OF MB. PHILIP A. S. FEAITKLIN, PBESIDEVT 
IFTEBHATIOITAI MERCANTILE MABIFE CO., HO. 9 BBOAD- 
WAY, HEW YOBK CITY. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 

The Chatrman. Give your name, please? 

Mr. FiLANKLiN. Philip A. S. Franlmn. 
^ The Chairman. Your residence is New York? 

Mr. Frakkun. My residence is New York. 

The Chairman. And you hold some official position in the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine Co. ? 

Mr. Franklin. I do. 

The Chairman. What is it ? 

Mr. Franklin. I am president of the International Mercantile 
Marine Co. 

The Chairman. How long have you been president of that com- 
panv? 

Mr. Franklin. About 13 years. 

The Chairman. How long has that concern been in existence % 



12Q6 8HIPPINQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Franklin. The International Mercantile Marine Co. succeeded 
the International Navigation Co. in 1902. The International Navi- 
gation Co. of New Jersey was incorporated in 1893. 

The Chairman. Have you at some time held some position in the 
Shipping Board or the Emergency Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Franklin. I never hdd a position in the Shipping Board or 
the Fleet Corporation, hut I was chairman of the ship>control com- 
mittee during the last year of the war and until December 31, 1918. 
The ship-control committee had charge of the ships owned, requisi- 
tioned, and chartered by the Shipping Board, and also had chaige of 
the transportation business for the War Department. 

The Chairman. Was that a conmiittee which reported to the 
Shipping Board in any way ? 

Mr. Franklin. It reported to the Shipping Board and to the War 
Department. It was a committee appointed by both the War De- 
partment and the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. Is that committee still in existence? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir; that committee resigned on December 31, 
1918. 

The Chairman. And how many members constituted that com- 
mittee ? 

Mr. Franklin. Three members: Mr. H. H. Raymond, and Sir 
Connop Guthrie, and myself. 

The Chairman. He was the representative of Great Britain on the 
cormnittee ? 

Mr. Franklin. At the time he was appointed he was the represen- 
tative in New York and in the United States of the British ministry 
of shipping. WTien the committee was first appointed by Mr. Hurley 
the idea was to try to work out the committee from a cooperative 
international point of view. 

The Chairman. Some time during 1919 your committee became 
interested in the matter of securing the steamship Leviaihan ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. At about what time did you first begin considering 
that matter ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I should say in September, 1919, about the 
time the Leviathan was coming out of troop-transport service. 

The Chairman. And with whom did you conduct negotiations 
about that matter ? 

Mr. Franklin. We had two or three conferences, and there were 
other people present, but really the negotiations were conducted with 
Judge Payne, the chairman of the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. Who fixed the terms of this contract that was 
executed on December 17? 

Mr. Franklin. The terms were all fixed between Judge Payne and 
ourselves. The contract was drawn up, modified, and finally ac- 
cepted. 

The Chairman. Do you know about when you first began that 
work of putting the contract in shape ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would say about the end of November. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether or not, prior to the actual 
signing of the contract, any negotiations had been entered into look- 
ing to securing contracts with mdependent concerns for doing some 
of this work ? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 129T 

Mr. Fbankun. Prior to the signing of t]be contract ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Franexin. At the same time that we were discussing the 
matter with Judge Payne, along to the end of November, we were 
also discussing the matter with several shipbuilders with a view to 
getting such information as we could as to how the business could 
be best handled. I would say it was about from the middle to the 
end of November. 

The Chairman. And prior to the actual execution of this contract 
appointing the I. M. M. as agent you called a conference of certain 
gentlemen to consider the matter of reconditioning the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Franklin. Do you mean the conference in conjunction with 
the Shipping Board ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Franklin. No. My recollection is that was called immedi- 
ately after the signing of the contract, but the date on the minutes 
that you have before you of that meeting will confirm that recol- 
lection. 

The Chairman. The date of the first meeting is December 3, as I 
recall it. 

Mr. Franklin. Is that the first large meeting? 

The Chairman. That is the meeting called as the result of the 
telOT'am which you sent to certain gentlemen. 

mr. Franklin. Well then, that is right. 

The Chairman. Then I think there was another meeting the next 
dav, on the 4th,- do you recall that? 

Mr. Franklin. My recollection is that the telegrams we sent out 
were sent out on Saturday, and that the meeting was held in the very 
earlv days of the following week. I think there was no meeting 
held, between the time that the telegrams were sent out and the 
joint meeting. 

The Chairman. You acted as chairman of the meeting? 

Mr. Franklin. We called the meeting at the suggestion and with 
the cooperation of the Shipping Board, and I acted as chairman of 
the meeting. 

The Chairman. I have in my hand, Mr. Franklin, which I will 
show you for the purpose of refreshing your recollection, a carbon 
copy of the minutes held on December 3, to discuss the recondition- 
ing of the Leviathan, and at which the following were present: 

Mr. R. L. Hague, of the United States Shipping Board. 

Mr. G. W. Sterling, of the United States Snipping Board. 

Mr. P. A. S. Franilin, president of the I. M. M. Co. 

Mr. W. F. Gibbfi, chief of construction of the I. M. M. Co. 

Mr. J. W. Powell, president of the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation. 

Mr. E. E. Palen, vice president of the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. 

Mr. T. Ross, repair manager of the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. 

Mr. M. A. Neeland, president of the New York Shipbuilding Corporation. 

Mr. J. H. Mull, president of the Cramp Ship & Engine Building Co. 

Mr. W. H. Todd, president of the Todd Shipyards Corporation. 

Mr. Andrew Fletcner, president of the W. & A. Fletcher Co. 

Mr. W. A. Fletcher, jr., vice president of the W. & A. Fletcher Co. 

Mr. E. P. Morse, sr., president of the Morse Dry Dock & Repair Co. 

Mr. Cletus Keating, oi the Kirlin, Woolsey & Hickox. 

The first paragraph of the minutes reads: 

The above committee met in pursuance of the following telegraphic communication : 
"With object of discussing rehabilitation of Leviathan it would be greatly appre- 



1298 SHIPPING BOABD OPBBATIOKS. 

ciated by Mr. Hague, of the Sihipping Board and myself if you would attend a 
meeting at our office, No. 9 Broadway, at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning, December 3. 

"P. A. S.Franklin." 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. 

The Chairman. That meeting, as the minutes describe^ was to 
discuss reconditioning of the Leviathan. 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir; that was the first meeting. 

The Chairman. If you wish to refer to those minutes as I proceed, 
you may see them [handing copy of the minutes over to the witness]. 

Mr. !^RANKLiN. Yes, sir; I remember this perfectly. 

The Chairman. You acted as chairman ol that meeting? 

Mr. Franklin. I did. 

The Chairman. Will you state in a general way what the piirpose 
of that meeting was ? 

Mr. Franklin. The purpose of that meeting was to get together 
all the principal shipbuildmg people who it was thought had yards 
and plants that were proper for the handling of this important job 
and <to have a general discussion over the whole situation with a view 
to deciding as to how it could best be handled and to get their best 
thought and judgment on the project. 

The Chairman. During the discussion which was had, there was 
a difference of opinion as to how the matter should be handled, 
wasn't there? 

Mr. Franki^in. No; my recollection is that there was pratically 
no difterence of opinion. The only difference of opinion that was 
developed in anv way was that certain parties present considered 
that thev could make lump-sum bids for the work, while others 
present did not think that lump-sum bids could be made. There 
was no difference of opinion really but that was simply an expres- 
sion of view. 

The Chairman. Whether it should be undertaken on a lump- 
sum bid or upon a cost-plus fee. 

Mr. Franklin. Whether a lump-sum bid or a cost-plus bid, or 
the matter was discussed whether there was anv other basis that 
could be arrived at which would accomplish the same object and get 
rid of the objectionable cost-plus feature. 

The Chairman. And do you recall whether or not some suggestions 
were made that the work be divided up into different contracts, 
some to take charge of oil installation ana others to include furnish- 
ing, and so on ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; I think that was discussed, and I also heard 
discussed the proposition that each deck should be left out sepa- 
rately to different contractors. There were a great many things of 
that kind that were discussed just prior to this time and during 
that meeting, but the consensus of opinion as I remember of that 
meeting was that the first thing to be done was that they should 
all assist from a national point of view with the same object — that 
of doin^ this thing as well as it could be done, realizing that nothing 
of the Kind had ever been done before in the United States, ana 
that they should all get together with the view of making the best 

Eossible job on this boat. With that in view they decided that the 
est course of procedure would be to immediatelv work on plans 
and specifications, each institution to put forward its best experts 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOirS. 1299 

in the particular line to serve on the committees. It was a very 
helpful meeting and the spirit was right. 

The Chairman. You made a statement substantially along that 
line to the gentlemen after they first assembled, did you not? 

Mr. Franklin. 1 did. 

The CHAntMAN. Who selected these various representatives of 
these shipbuilding concerns, repair yards, etc. ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, they were put forward in general discussion. 
One man would say to the other: lou have a very good expert in 
electricity, in electric lighting and wiring. Another would say : You 
have an expert in oilmg. Each recognized the particular ability 
of such men in the shipbuilding industry. .And certain men were 
mentioned along certain lines, and the consensus of opinion was 
unanimous tnat they were experts along those particular lines. 

Tne Chairman, l^hat was at tne first meeting? 

Ikfr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

Tne Chairman. Who selected the men who did attend the first 
meeting? 

Mr. Franklin. Mr. Ha^e came to my office on Saturday morning 
and we discussed it and decided to whom we would send telegrams. 
Our object was to include everybody we thought had a plant and 
a staff capable of being of material assistance in this work. 

The Chairman. So the selection was the result of a conference 
between you and Mr. Hague ? 

Mr. Franklin. Right. 

The Chairman. AG. Hague knew that you were negotiating for 
this contract to be appointed the agent of the Shippmg Board, I 
assume? 

Mr. Franklin. Mr. Chairman, I would not like to say that posi- 
. tively . but I think you will find by referring to the Shipping Board 
recoros that the Shipping Board nas passed a resolution assigning 
this steamer to us, nnor to this meeting, with the imderstanding that 
an a^eement should be drawn up to cover it. I think that is the 
way it was done. At any rate, at that time we had been assured, or 
had been told, that we were to have the steamer; under the circum 
stances, it was si mply a matter of drawing the agreement. 

The Chairman. Who told you that ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I would not like to say, but I think we were 
advised from Washington that a resolution had been passed, and 
whether Mr. Hague told us or not I am not prepared to say. I could 
look up our correspondence on that if you want me to do so. 

The Chairman. If you had been told that do you recall anything 
that was said at any time prior to this first meeting by Mr. Hague, 
relative to that matter ? 

Mr. Franklin. Prior to that first meeting ? 

The Chairman. Yes; when you were selecting these representative 
shipping concerns, or at any other conference do you recall anything 
said byl^r. Hague touching on this contract which you expected to 
get or this assignment of the Leviathan to your company? 

Mr. Frankun. No; I do not, because I had no negotiations or 
conversations with anybody of any importance — I mean any im- 
portant conversations, regarding the assigning of the Leviathan, 
except with Judge Payne, and with the people that he had present 
at the conferences that we had together ffow, Mr. Chairman, I 



1800 8HIFPINQ BOAKD OPERATIONS. 

would like to say that Mr. Hague was at one if not at all those con- 
ferences, but we had no discussions or negotiations with Mr. Hague^ 
of my own knowledge and belief, until after the ship had been 
assigned to us. 

Tne Chairman. Do you know whether at any of those conferences 
any existing contracts were discussed with relation to work ta be done 
or in progress on the Leviathan i 

Mr. Franklin. Any existing contracts? 

The Chairman. Do you know the firm of Walker & Gillette ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; I know that firm. 

The Chairman. Did you ever hear any contract discussed prior 
to this first meeting, any details of a contract with them or any 
negotiations that were pending with them ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; none at all. 

The Chairman. Were any other firms discussed in your conference 
with Mr. Hague than those which were eventually selected? 

Mr. Frankun. No; I know that no other firms were discussed. 
The discussion was whether there was anybody else competent and 
properly equipped for that class of work, any other firms along the 
coast who could properly do the work And we felt that we had 
covered everybody. The idea was to cover those that were prepared 
to go ahead with it. 

Tho Chairman. Are you familiar wath the various yards in the 
vicinity of New York ? 

Mr. l^^RANKLiN. Well, I am only familiar in the way that we have 
had work done in practically every yard. 

The Chairman. Have you had work done at the Todd yards? 

Mr. P'ranklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And at the Morse Dry Dock yards? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; we have had work done at the Morse Dry 
Dock yard, but that was simply dry docking and repairing. 

The Chairman. And at the Tietjen & Lang yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; we have had both kinds of work done down 
there, repairing and extensive overhauls. 

The Chairman. And at the James Shewan & Sons yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. I think we have had some repairing done there, 
but I would not like to say positively. 

The Chairman. And at the New York Ship? 

Mr. Franklin. We have had only construction work done there. 
They have built ships for us, but never have done any repairing or 
rejuvenation, such as this work is. 

The Chairman. And how about Fletcher ? 

Mr Franklin. We have had a great deal of work done there, by 
Fletcher & Todd. 

The Chairman. How about Bethlehem ? 

Mr. Franklin. They have never done any repair work for us at all. 
The Sparrows Point Co., which they bought out, buUt for us some 
steamers. 

The Chairman. And how about the Cramp yard? 

Mr. Franklin. They have built us steamers, and have built them 
most satisfactorily, but have never done any repair work for us. 

The Chairman. How about the Newport News Dry Dock & Ship- 
building Co. ? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1301 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; we have had some repair work done there, but 
never in the last four or five years. They did some extensive jobs for 
Tis seven or eight years ago. 

The Chairman. In this conference with Mr. Hague, was anv 
standard of qualifications agreed upon which the various yards 
would have to come up to beK>re they would be called into this con- 
ference ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; no detailed standard. We each had our 
knowledge of exactly what the situation was at the various plants, 
or an idea of the capacity and the ability of the various yards of the 
country. 

The Chairman. By capacity, I assume you mean equipment and 
organization ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir; and technical staff, which was very much 
in our minds. 

The Chairman. Did you also consider the financial responsibility 
of the various concerns 1 

Mr. Franklin. We did. 

The Chairman. These various firms which were considered and 
which had done work for you, had all of them done satisfactory work i 

Mr. Franklin. I would say, generally, ves; but sometimes a firm 
will do satisfactory work on one job and not on another job; but 
generally speaking, I will answer that question, yes. 

The Chairman. At this conference was the Shewan yard discussed ? 

Mr. Franklin. Do you mean at the conference between Mr. Hague 
And myself 1 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Franklin. I do not remember that the Shewan yards were 
discussed. Our minds were working, as I said before, on picking out 
people with whom we were satisned. We did not discuss every 
individual small yard. 

The Chairman. At this time, after the conferences had been held, 
various disciussions, and so forth, would you say that there are any 
yards in this vicinity which would come uj) to the qualifications you 
agreed upon ought to be possessed and which were not considered — 
I mean as to the yards — either at the first conference or at the sub- 
sequent conferences held by the representatives of the various ship- 
yards? 

Mr. Franklin. I would say no. If we had it to do all over again, 
as far as I am concerned, I would do exactly what we did then. 

The Chairman. And you would not include any other yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not another yard. 

The Chairman. You would not eliminate any yards that were 
taken into conference and with whom you consulted ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there any particidar reason why the Shewan 
yard was not discussed ? 

lifr. Franklin. Not the slightest. If we had some ordinary repairs 
to be made, we would be very glad to consider them. 

The Chairman. I will ask your opinion now as to whether or not 
the Shewan yard, as to its organization, equipment, location, financial 
responsibility, staff, and other qualifications, was such as to make it 
reasonable to consider them in connection with this project ? 



1302 SHiPPUsro boabd operations. 

Mr. Franklin. My reply to that is, that as far as I am concerned, 
with the knowledge 1 have of them, they are not sufficiently staffed 
and equipped to do a job of this kind ; that was the impression under 
which I was at that time, and that is my impression to-day. They 
are very good people. I am not casting the slightest reflection upon 
them. 

The Chairman. I understand. Is their yard as large as the 
Fletcher yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would have to state no, but I wish to say further 
than that that they have not had the joiner experience, work of that 
nature, such as the Fletcher yard has nad. 

The Chairman. Your view is that their concern has not had the 
general aU-roimd experience that these other yards have had. 

Afr. Franklin. My imderstanding is that they have not had the 
all-round general experience in construction work of that nature, of 
the nature that that was; and that was a very important part and 
factor in the Leviathan. 

The Chairman. Coming to the first meeting of the repersentatives 
of the shipbuilding concerns, which convened in response to your 
telegram and at which there was this general discussion and sug;^es- 
tions of cost-plus and lump-sum bases, did some of the representatives 
there, for instance, the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., 
express some doubt as to whether they could t^e the ship in any 
event ? 

Afr, Franklin. My recollection is that the Newport News people 
said they could not take the ship, but that thev would be very glad 
to be as helpful as possible in connection with the work. 

The Chairman. Did any other concern express doubts as to whether 
they woidd agree to bid upon it ? 

Mr. Franklin. My recollection is that all concerns said they would 
not be interested in bidding on a lump-sum basis, except Mr. Todd 
and Mr. Morse. The New York Ship had previously stated to us that 
they could not take on the work in any way. I am not sure about 
the others, except in the general way that they considered the work 
could not be taken on by them on a lump-sum basis, that it was too 
big a job. 

Now, Mr. Chairman, I would like to make one thing clear 

The Chairman (interposing). Certainly. 

Mr. Franklin. Because I do not know whether your mind is clear 
on that point or not, and that is, that prior to this meeting we had 
had several conferences, informal conferences, with the Messrs. Cramp 
and the Messrs. Fletcher regarding doing the work. You see that has 
nothing to do with this meeting, and was all prior to this meeting. 
It was rather a discussion to develop the whole situation. 

The Chairman. You mean prior to you conferences with Mr.Hague 

Mr. Franklin. The conference with Mr. Hague, as I have told 
you, took place on Saturday. 

The Chairman. I mean prior to that. 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; prior to that. 

The Chairman. After the negotiation that was conducted by you 
especially with these other men ? 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely. 



SHIPFIHG BOABD OPSRATIONS. 1303 

The Chairican. Anticipating having this ship turned over to you, 
you were looking about seeing if you Gould get a single firm to under- 
take the work for a completra job ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. I was looking about for several reasons; where the 
work could be done, how it could be done, what would be the possible 
cost, and to get a general knowledge of the situation to help me in my 
discussions with the Shipping Board. 

The Chaibman. At this last conference with Mr. Hague, just prior 
to the meeting, did you discuss the matter of the work oeing done at 
the navy yard ? 

Mr. E'rankhn. I do not think we discu^ed the matter of the work 
bein^ done at the navy yard. I do not think that came up until 
withm the last two or three months, something of that kind. I do 
not think it was discussed at that time at all. 

The Chairman. Did he at any time prior to this last conference 
state to you that the Navy Yard had done some work, or was doing 
some work of reconditioning ships, or did you know it? 

Mr. Franklin. I knew along in January that the navy yard had 
undertaken some work. 

The Chairman. Of this year, do you mean ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; of this year. 

The Chairman. Was that the first that you had known of it? 

Mr. Franklin. I was just trymg to think whether that was the 
first, and I think it was about that time. To the best of my recol- 
lection at the time this telegram was sent out and at the time that 
meeting was held, I do not think we discussed doing the work at the 
navy yard at all. It was somewhat after that that the navy yard 
matter came up. 

The Chairman. That the navy yard was considered? 

Mr. Franklin. That it was thought about. 

The Chairman. Just what organization has the I. M. M. for taking 
charjge of this work ? What is jour organization, and what experience 
has it had, and what other ships has it handled in a similar way ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, it has handled all sorts of steamers for 
years in a more or less similar way but not as extensive. The organi- 
zation to handle this work is headed by Mr. W. F. Gibbs. It is the 
constructing department of the I. M. M. Co., and mixed into this 
whole situation has got to be brought a good deal of knowledge 
from the point of view of the operation of the ships, and the passenger 
department, and all that sort of thing, because this ship should 
only be dealt with from the point of view of her future operation 
and her future earning capacity. 

The Chairman. And you as the representative of the I. M. M. 
were particularly interested in that feature of it ? 

Mr. Franklin. In the whole thing. 

The Chairman. Having already applied for the ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

The Chairman. And having agreed upon the essential features of 
the contract, which was to turn this ship over to you as agent with 
the option of purchasing it, and also with a clause providing that 
upon ner being reconditioned you were to have her as operator for 
the term of five years ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. 



1304 SHippniro boabd operahohs. 

The Chairman. Who else composes this organization besides Mr. 
Gibbs ; what other officials of the L M. M. ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, Mr. Gibbs and his brother are the chief 
officials, and there are other people in there. There are draftsmen, 
etc. But Mr. Gibbs will give you a list of the whole organization. 
And if you wish our own organization we can give that to you. The 
organization will be expanded as the necessity of the business de- 
velops. 

The Chairman. Notwithstanding the existence of your own organi- 
zation, which you felt was competent to undertake this work at the 
time, I assume, you called in the representatives of these various 
firms, and for what purpose ? 

Mr. Franklin. For the purpose of getting such information and 
light and cooperation from all the shipbuilding companies as we 
could, and also to satisfy everybody that the course of procedure 
that might be determined upon was the correct one. We felt that 
we could not have too much knowledge and information; nor could 
they, the shipbuilding eompanies. In other words, we were anxious 
that they should have ail the knowledge and information they 
wanted, and should make any suggestions, in order to enable them 
to make their bids on the work. 

The Chairman. And the minutes which were kept of this first 
meeting set forth in a general way and also in some detail what was 
said and what took place ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. Was there any secret agreement or understanding 
had in this first meeting of which there is any other record extent I 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely none that I know of nor that we were 
in any way a party to. 

The Chairman. Was there any secret agreement or understand- 
ing entered into of which there is no record extant ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not that I know of in any way. 

The Chairman. As the result of that first meeting it was determined 
that two certain committees should be appointed ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Who was to be the chairman of each of those 
committees ? 

Mr. Franklin. Mr. Gibbs. 

The Chairman. Your chief of construction ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Of the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Who was to have general supervision of this work? 

Mr. Franklin. Mr. Gibbs. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether or not prior to this first 
meeting, and prior to the Saturday conference preceding the meeting 
which you held with Mr. Hague, the Shipping Board had entered 
into negotiations looking toward the installation of oil fuel in the 
Leviathan f 

Mr. Franklin. I know nothing about that. I understood that 
the Shipping Board was investigatmg how oU fuel could be installed, 
and everythmg pertaining to it, but 1 knew of no negotiations. My 
recollection is that they told me thejr were investigating that matter ; 
nothing was said about any negotiations. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIOKS. 1S05 

The Chairman. Did Mr. Hague ever tell you that he expected to 
have bids for that work ? 

Afr. Franklin. My recollection is that Mr. Hague told me at this 
meeting that there might be bids for various parts of the work, but 
I do not remember that he particularly mentioned oil. Oil mi^ht 
have been discussed, and that might have been said without makmg 
any impression on me because there was the general thought all the 
way through that it might be possible to divide the general work 
from the ofl installation. Those were the only two separations that 
mLght possibly have been made. That was (uscussed several times. 

The Chairman. Was that discussed at any conferences with Judge 
Pavne, the chairman of the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would not like to say yes or no on that. I 
think it was mentioned at the conference to Judge Payne. When 
we were talking about it he asked how we proposed to proceed 
regarding this matter of the reconstruction oi the ship, and that 
might have been mentioned at that time; I would not be a bit sur- 
prised if it was, because it was a thing that was in our minds at the 
tune. 

The Chairman. If I might just go back for a moment, Mr. Frank- 
lin. When first did you. unaertake, either by conference with the 
Shipping Board officials, or by correspondence or by making inquiry, 
to secure this ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. The first conversation I had with Judge Payne 
regarding this ship was, to the best of my knowledge and belief, 
in the very early oays of September. 

The Chairman. I beg pardon, what was that date ? 

Mr. Franklin. To the oest of my knowledge and belief in the very 
earlv days of September. 

The Chairman. That was a conference ? 

Mr. Franklin. That was an interview that I had with Judge 
Payne. 

The Chairman. Was the question of your taking it over as agent 
discussed thenf 

Mr. Franklin. I think the whole matter was not discussed in 
detail; it was just that I told Judge Payne whenever the LevidtJum 
became free and ready for business we would like very much to be 
considered in connection with the future of the ship. I do not think 
we sot down to any detailed discussion imtil along about the middle 
of November, if my recollection is correct. 

The Chairman. Also at this time were negotiations going on for 
the sale and purchase by your company ? 

Mr. Franklin. I never had heard oi any negotiations for the sale 
or purchase of the steamer until we received, on January 3, a request 
from the Shipping Board, to make a bid on all and each of the ex- 
German passenger ships. 

The Chairman. And prior to that time you had never asked for 
an opportunity to purchase the ship 'i 

Mr. Franklin. We had never asked for an opportunity to purchase 
the ship prior to that time. 

The Chairman. Your negotiations prior to that time with the 
Shipping Board officials were along the lines of either securing the 
appomtment or designation as agent for reconditioning or of getting 
the ship as operator! 

177068— 20— FT 4 5 



1306 SHIPPIKQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

The Chairman. That is so, isn't it? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; that is so. 

The Chairman. Did you know in October, 1919, that Mr. Hague 
had been conducting negotiations looking toward having fuel oil 
installation work done, and that he had notified the Shippmg Board 
that he expected to have bids for that work ? 

Mr. Franklin. I do not know that he had notified the Shipping 
Board that he expected to have bids. As I stated before, I did Imow 
and I was clearly under the impression, having been advised by some- 
body, that the Shipping Board had under consideration and were 
studying how the ship could be oiled. But whether they had asked 
for bids or whether they had carried on any negotiations were matters 
that I have no information on. 

The Chairman. In any event, if there were such negotiations, either 
for fuel oil or for doing .any other of this work of reconditioning, the 
negotiations which you entered into and which resulted in the 
contract of December 17, eliminated all that. 

Mr. Franklin. In my mind they did. 

The Chairman. And you have never been called upon to consider 
any independent propositions which may have been made to the 
Shipping ^oard looking to fuel oil installation. 

Mr. Franklin. At no time in any of our discussions or conferences 
prior to the meeting here that you have the minutes of, called on 
Saturday, December 3, were we told by the Shipping Board that 
there were any obligations or any contracts, or anybody that we had 
to consider in connection with the work. Now, of course, we were 
only being appointed agents to do the work for the Shipping Board 
and. whatever we attempted to do would have to be put before the 
Shipping Board for their approval before we made any contracts. 
But we were never advised tnat they had assumed any oohgations or 
entered into any contract or anything else. 

The Chairman. But generally you were their agent to do that 
work, subject of course to the approval of the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely. And we were not nampered by any 
instructions or advice of any obligation in any other direction. 

The Chairman. And you did not know prior to your negotiations 
with Judge Payne, or during them, and prior to the execution of the 
contract, that specifications had been prepared relating to fuel oil 
installation ? 

Mr. Franklin. I did not know the specifications had been pre- 
pared. As I say, the only thing I knew was that the Shipping 
Board had xmder consideration and were making a study of the in- 
stallation of oil fuel, but I knew none of the details. I did not 
know with whom they were working or anything else. 

The Chairman. Now, going back to your 

Mr. Franklin (interposing). As a matter of fact, we were dis- 
cussing with the other shipbuilders the best type of burner, which I 
mention to show you that we knew nothing about it. I remember 
the Cramps mentioned a burner that they particularly favored. We 
were aU of open mind on it. 

The Chairman. So that when you got to work as agent of the 
Shipping Board vou started in without regard to anything that might 
have been done oy the Shipping Board previously. 



SHIPPme BOARD OPERATIOKS. 1S07 

Mr. Franklin. That is right, sir. ■ 

The Chairman. You started in fresh i 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely. 

The Chairman. And looked at it as a new problem without any 
strings tied to it from the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And have you handled it in that way ever since ? 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely. 

The Chairman. Have you as agent received any request, direct or 
implied, from any of the officials of the Shipping Board to consider 
any particular finn or individual in connection with the doing of any 
of tms work ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not that I know of, but that could be better 
answered by Mr. Gibbs. As far as I am concerned I will say no. 

The Chairman. WeD, Mr. Franklin, I am asking you as the 
president of the I. M. M. 

Mr. Franklin. And as far as I am concerned I answer no. 

The Chairman. Have you received any information, direct or im- 
plied, from anv of the officials of the Shipping Board to not consider 
or to disregard any particular firm or corporation in connection with 
this work ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Since these conferences, the first of which was 
held on the 3d of December 

Mr. Franklin (interposing). Called on the 3d of December. 

The Chairman. No; I thmk it was held then. It was called on 
the Saturday before the 3d of December by telegram. 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. 

The Chairman. Since that meeting and the subsequent meetings 
have you been asked by the representatives of any other firms, other 
than those who had representatives at that conference, for an oppor- 
tunity to be considered in doing some of this work ? 

Mr. Franklin. T have not. 

The Chairman. Since that time have you yourself considered 
inviting any representatives of any other concerns to these confer- 
ences ? 

Mr. Franklin. I have not. 

The Chairman. With reference to the doing of the work, have you 
felt since those conferences that any other concerns might well be 
considered"!! connection with the work ? 

Mr. Franklin. I have not felt that any other concerns might be 
considered, but I have felt quite strongly that if the Brooklyn Navy 
Yard or the Boston Navy Yard would care to take on this work that 
I believed, considering that they are owned by the Government, that 
they are Government yards, and that you would continue to use the 
employees and continue the work of tneir staffs and their organiza- 
tions, and with everything else being considered, t would rather the 
ship, as far as we are concerned as the agents, should go to one of 
the navy yards than to anybody else. Now, as regards getting the 
steamer to such yards, I do not think it a very serious complication, 
because the ship can not go to any yard anyhow, and it is only a 
question of distance. 

The Chairman. When you say "any yard'' do you mean any 
navy yard or any private yard ? 



1808 SHIFPINa fiOABD OPEBAXIOHa. 

Mr. Franklin. To any private yard. But I do not see that that 
is important. And it seems to me the navy yard should be able to 
do the work, and through the navy yard, between ourselves, and the 
Government, there should be suBlet any work that they are not 
qualified to do or, I mean, not equipped to do. 

The only question in my tnind that has ever arisen at all is that this 
is a ship which to a very lai^e extent is a matter of decorating and 
outfitting, and whether the Navy is as well equipped as anybody else 
for that work, and whether they would be equally prepared to handle 
it in that way. If those features can be satisfactorily dealt with I 
believe everybody who has any responsibility regarding this steamer 
will be in a more comfortable position if the work is done by the 
Government; and I believe vou can get practically as efficient a Job. 

The Chairman. Mr. Franldin, wjis your concern a bidder for this 
ship when it was offered for sale ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether there were any other 
bidders ? 

Mr. Franklin. I understood that there were no other bidders. 

The Chairman. And the sale of this ship was subject to the injunc- 
tion proceedings which were had ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I think if I could just review that for a 
xninute for you it would be better. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Franklin. The Snipping Board on January 3 asked for bids 
on all and each, to be opened on January 20. Now, the bids that we 
made included all the ex-German steamers and then, to a large extent, 
each one. In other words, our bid was made exactly in line with the 
Shipping Board's request. If those bids had been acted upon on 
January 20 or shortly thereafter, the Shipping Board was at that 
tixne free and could nave sold those ships and have had a better 
proposition for them than they will ever get again. Our proposition 
at that time was to take 30 ships as is wherever they were and do 
all the repairs ourselves. But the Shipping Board aid not accept 
any of those offers. In about two weeks they said they would hold 
a public auction on February 16. About six days before that public 
auction was held, objections were made through the press and other- 
wise, and an injunction, I think, was gotten out about February 14 
or 15 prohibiting their sale. But the point I want to make is that 
they could have been sold prior to that injunction if the Shipping 
Board had wished to do so. The injunction now prohibits the sale 
of the Leviathan, 

The Chairman. Now, assuming, Mr. Franklin, that on January 20 
the Shipping Board had accepted your bid for the Leviathan — your 
company's bid — and you had purchased the ship, had taken posses- 
sion of her as owner, would you then have made any different arrange- 
ments as to the actual owner of the ship for her reconditioning than 
what you have made as agent ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not at that time, I wouldn't have. If the meeting 
on December 3 — or put it another way — prior to that meeting, ana 
if we had oMoied the steamer, if she had been our steamer, and the 
Government had not been in ownership of the ship, we would prob- 
ably have pursued a different course than we had in mind pursuing 
a different course, namely, the taking on of two shipbuilding com- 



SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIOKB. 1809 

panies, Messrs. Cramp & Son, of Philadelphia, on account of the expe- 
rience that we have had with the ships they have built for us, and our 
-appreciation of their expert and technical knowledge of the staff, 
for dealing with our passenger ships, and being the only people so 
close to New York with that knowledge and experience, associating 
with them Messrs. Fletcher, with their yard over in Hoboken near 
where the steamer was; and at that time our feeling was that we 
would have gotten started more promptly, gotten more expeditious 
work, and as good work as we could nave gotten under any other 
course of procedure, and if it had been our ship, that is the course 
of proced\u"e we would have pursued at that time. 

Now, yoxu* question is, if we had gotten the steamer in January ? 

The CShaibman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Franklin. Now about January these gentlemen had all gotten 
to work, and were drawing these plans and specifications, and every- 
thing of that kind, and we had been told by two firms that they were 
ready to make a lump sum bid. Therefore, my reply to you is that in 
January we would have proceeded exactly as we are proceeding now. 

The Chairman. But, if you were the owner in November or 
December, you would have done . 

Mr. Franklin. We would have probably done — that is what we 
had very much under consideration at that time. 

The Chairman. Have you considered the matter of having this 
boat reconditioned abroad ? 

Mr. Franklin. Judge Pajrne wrote me a letter, giving a cable that 
he had received from me builders of the boat. I replied to him just 
as I felt about it. My feeling, generally, was that the construction 
coufd have been done for considerable less money, in much less time, 
but that I felt for two reasons it was a very doubtful course of pro- 
cedure. First, that this is an American ship, and such extensive 
overhauls and expenditures of money on the ship should be done in 
the United States; and the labor and material maKers, and everybody 
else, generally, should have the benefit of that, and you are giving 
your own money out on a job of this kind. The next view I had was 
that it was very desirable in view of the future of the American flag, 
for the shipbuilding interests to have this experience, and my own 
feeling is that if this shin is to be put in order here, and put in com- 
mission, and the work all done here, the money spent, from an edu- 
cational point of view, will be fairly well spent. 

I do not think you could write it all up to the ship: The United 
States had got to nave experience in the construction and the fitting 
out of these big ships, before it can get the place it ought to have in 
the commerce of the world. So I am not in favor of the ship going 
to Germany, on that account, but that is all a matter of record. We 
can give you a copy of the letters. 

The Chairman. 1 have a copy of your letter in reply to Judge 
Payne. 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, you have that ? 

The Chairman. Yes, sir. Now do you think that the ownership 
and operation of this ship, reconditioned as proposed to have it done, 
is an asset to the American merchant marine? 

Mr. Franklin. I do. I think that the operation of this ship, and 
the having of this ship, in case of the merchandise, and having her 
in good soimd running condition all the time, is an asset; and I do 



1310 SHIPPma BOABD OPBBA.TIOKS. 

not know but that the training and experience that she will give to 
your people is also an asset. 

The Chairman. Do you think, for that purpose, that it is necessary 
for the Government to put her back in exactly the condition that she 
was before ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; practically the condition. 

The Chairman. As a shipping man, do you think she could be 
restored to a useable condition lor passenger transportation without 
duplicating her former condition ? 

Mr. Franklin. No 

The Chairman. So as to answer all necessary purposes? 
tMr. Franklin. Unless you practically duplicate her former con- 
dition you will not get the maximum amoimt of efficiency from an 
earning and operating point of view from the steamer, and to a cer- 
tain extent you would be wasting your money. There is nothing else 
for that steamer unless you do her over in a manner that will make 
her as efficient as she can possibly be made from the point of view of 
attracting money and maintaining her regular service. 

The Chairman. Will this ship, m point of equipment and appoint- 
ments, be in a class by itself ? 

Mr. Franklin. No-^ she will be in the class with the Imperator. 

The Chairman. Pardon me, before you continue. I did not make 
my question complete. Will she be in a class by herself as far as 
the American merchant marine is concerned ? 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, entirely; absolutely. 

The Chairman. Now to proceed with what you have started: Are 
there other ships which may be considered in tne same class ? 

Mr. Franklin. The Imperator, the Aquatania, and the Olympic. 

The Chairman. And they are owned or operated by the companies 
of what country ? 

Mr. Franklin. The Imperator is in a similar position to tiiis 
steamer, having been taken over through the reparation commission 
by the British Grovernment, and has been allocated to one of the 
British shipping firms for management and operation. The Bismarck, 
a sister ship of this steamer, is yet in Germany, not quite completed, 
and her future will have to be determined by the reparation commis- 
sion. The Aquatania is owned by the Cxmard Steamship Co., and 
the Olympic is owned by the Oceanic Steamship Co., the White Star 
Line. 

The Chairman. They are British concerns ? 

Mr. Franklin. The Cunard and the White Star are both British. 

The Chairman. WTio is operating the Imperator, what concern ? ^ 

Mr. Franklin. The Cimard Line. 

The Chairman. If you had purchased the ship on January 20, by 
whom would the expense of reconditioning have to be borne ? 

Mr. Franklin. By the International Mercantile Marine Co. 

The Chairman. In other words, your bid for the Leviathan was the 
same in that case as for the other vessels, the ship '^ as is t '' 

Mr. Franlkin. As is; and under our bid they nad the right to put 
the Leviathan to us, and nothing else, or take m the group. 

The Chairman. Now, just with reference to that concern, a few 
questions, Mr. Franklin: Is your concern a holding company; have 
you some subsidiary ? 



SHIPPIH6 BOABD OPERATIONS. 1311 

Mr. F&ANKLiN. The Iiiteniational Mercantile Marine Co. owns 
certain steamers under the American flag. It owns an interest in the 
New York Shipbuilding Co. — ^no; it does not. It owns stock in that 
through another company; and owns steamers and stocks in other 
companies. 

The Chairman. Have you any interest in the shipbuilding com- 
panies abroad ? 

Mr. Franklin. We have no owTrership interest in any shipbuilding 
companies abroad. 

The Chairman. Are all of the ships which you own, or in which you 
have an interest, or in which you operate ships under the American 

Mr. Franklin. Th^ ships owned by the International Mercantile 
Marine Co. direct are imder the American flag. The ships owned by 
the foreign companies of which the American company owns all of 
their shares, sail xmder the flag of the country under which the com- 
pany is domiciled. 

The Chairman. My attention is diverted. That is operating the 
ship? 

Mr. Franklin. No; I say they sail under the flag of the coimtry in 
which the company which owns them is domiciled. 

The Chairman. You are referring now to ships which you operate 
and not which you own ? 

Mr. Franklin. Ships in which we own all the shares of the com- 
pany that owns and operates those particular ships. 

The Chairman. Well now, which class are in tne majority; ships 
under the American flag, or ships under foreign flags ? 

Mr. Franklin. The ships under the foreign flags are in the majority, 
but I would like to get before you the fact that we own those com- 
panies outright. They do not control us in any sense of the word. 
We own them outright, and Uiere is a chart of our existence. If you 
would Uke to see it, I could explain that. 

The Chairman. Perhaps, if you explain that chart and follow it out. 

Mr. Franklin. Now, there is the American companies. You see 
the International Mercantile Marine Co. [indicatmg] and that is 
owned and controlled in every sense of the word by Americans, and 
it is the best outfit that America has in shipping if she would only 
use it. Now, that company controls every snare of that company 
[indicating]. 

The Chairman. Atlantic Transport Co. ? 

Mr. Franklin. Atlantic Transport Co. It owns every share of 
stock of that company, the International Nav^ation Co. (Ltd.). It 
owns every share of the Societe Anonyme De Navigation Belge- 
Americane of Antwerp, which is the Belgian company. 

The Chairman. The International Navigation Co., where is that? 

Mr. Franklin. That is a British company, domiciled in England, 
which is the holding company of these companies [indicating], and 
every share of this company is owned by the American company 
[indicating]. 

The CHAiRBfAN. Now, the Atlantic Transport Co. ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is a British company, in England. No; that 
is the Atlantic Transport Co. of West Virginia — no ; that is an Aineri- 
can company of West Virginia; and that company holds interest in 
the HoDand-American Line, and an interest in the New York Ship 



1812 SHIPPING BOARD 0PBRATI0K8. 

buildins; Co. Now, what I want to get clear to you is that this is all 
controlled — the control is downward. You can not control back. 
The fellow that you own can not control you, and you own every one 
of these shares. 

The Chairman. The International Mercantile Marine found it 
necessary to form corporations in these other countries ? 

Mr. Franklin. The International Mercantile Marine, in 1902, con- 
sidered it would be advantageous if an American company could get 
a hold of these and become the owner of these great companies, and 
they, at that time, bou£:ht the shares of these British companies; and 
at that time it was looked upon as a very good transaction — a very 
wise thing for Americans to do. It got you into a steamship owner- 
ship that you could not have gotten in years, that is, the first thing. 
Xow, the next thing is that in November, 1918, it sold all that prop- 
ertv to the United States Government. 

iTie Chairman. All the property? 

Mr. Franklin. All the property — all the British property that we 
owned w*e sold to the T. nited States Government. We had the 
property. We had aU of our British property sold to a British 
sjrndicate. Our board of directors had passed a resolution authoriz- 
ing the proceeding with the closing of that contract. The United 
States Government stepped in and asked us not to conclude the 
contract. The next day we told them we got their message late in 
the afternoon — ^i^'e said we would have a meeting of the board of 
directors to-morrow morning, and we will stop the n^otiations. We 
had the meetings, and stopped negotiations^ That shows conclusively 
where the control lodged — ^^'here it was at that time. 

The Chairman. Who did you sell them to; what representative of 
the Government I 

Mr. Franklin. To the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. How many vessels were involved ? 

Mr. Franklin. About 80 vessels. 

The Chairman. And they are still the property of the United 
States? 

Mr. Franklin. Xo, sir; they are property of the International 
Mercantile Marine Co. 

The Chairman. You took them back again ? 

Mr. Franklin. We did not take them back; the United States 
elected not to conclude the transaction. 

The Chairman. That sale did not go through? 

Mr. Franklin. No; but they were bought. 

The Chairman. Now, is there anything to prevent all these 
steamers which are held by these foreign concerns, as subsidiary to 
the I. M. M. Co., placed under the American flag? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir; you could not place them under the 
American flag to-dav under the laws of Great Britain. 

The Chairman. That is some rule of the board of trade ? 

Mr. Franklin. This is the law of the land. 

The Chairman. It is the law of their own land ? 

Mr. Franklin. It is the law of their own land; but that does not 
prevent you selling the shares. 

The CIhairman. The selling of the shares of stock in the corpo- 
ration ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 



SHIPPIKO BOABD OPBRATIONS. 1818 

The Chairman. Are shares of the stock held by citizens of the 
country where the corporation is located ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; we hold them all. There is no ownership. 
There is a very small outstanding — a very small per cent outstanding 
in the Leyland Co. — the Leyland Line, that has been impossible to 
locate. It does not amount to anything. 

The Chairman. How about this Belgian Line, do you own all of 
the stock ? 

Mr. Franklin. We own it all. 

The Chairman. Do you own that as a company of individual 
members of your company ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; the ' ntemational Mercantile Marine Co. holds 
that. What 1 would like to get before you gentlemen is that, as far 
as we are concerned, the United States has objected to our selling 
this property. The Senators on the floor of the Senate have otn 

t'ected to our selling this property, but we are accused of being 
Jritish, because we own this property; and we had arranged to sell 
it. We were prevented from selling it by the Ignited States. 

The Chairman. What prompted you to sell this property ? 

Mr. Franklin. We were prompted by the fact that we considered 
it was a very advisable and a very good opportunity that was being 
put before us at that particular time, and we felt that, although the 
price was low, that for us to be able to get out of all of our foreign 
shipping at that time would have been a wise course of procedure 
at the prices mentioned. 

The CHAIRMAN. Of course, with the corresponding benefit to the 
shipping interests of the country to which the sale was made. 

Mr. Franklin. As far as we are concerned we were not considering 
the benefit to anybody except our own shareholders. We considered 
we were offered a price that, under all the circumstances and condi- 
tions, it would be difficult for us to get again. We were also desirous 
of developing under the American flag, and we felt that if we could 
get such a good price for all our foreign property, we would have a 
very huge sum of money to invest in American shipping, if we found 
we could get American shipping on what we considered a proper 
basis. 

The Chairman, jn other words, you thought it was a good busi- 
ness proposition ? 

Mr. Franklin. Right. 

The Chairman. To sell the ships ? 

Mr. Franklin. Right; that is the only reason we were ready to 
sell them. 

The Chairman. Now, if you had sold the ships disregarding the 
business end of it, and the advantage to your concern, would it 
have resulted in a loss to the American merchant marine? 

Mr. Franklin. My feeling is you have two features there — in 
the first place, I think that our ownership of this has been and will 
be, to a good extent, favorable to the American flag steamers. I 
think our company bein^ able to put these ships into these trades has 
been beneficial; but i think if a company, like ours, could have gotten 
itself in a position where it would have had such a tremendous 
amount of cash to invest in American flag shipping that it would 
have been a greater benefit to the Nation to have had that money to 
invest in your own ships. 



1314 SHIFPn^Q BOAED 0FBB4TI0H8. 

The Chairman. Couldn't those ships have been sold, for instance, 
the Atlantic Transport Co., which is an American corporation, and 
then put under the American flag ? 

Mr. Franklin. There is no way under heaven that the flag of these 
ships could have been transferred. 

The Chairman. They were built abroad ? 

Mr. Franklin. They were built abroad. 

The Chairman. And the law of the Ignited States prevents that 
also? 

Mr. Franklin. No ; the law of the United States did prevent that 
at certain times; but there were other times when it would have been 
possible under the Panama Canal act, as I remember it, but the law 
of Great Britain prevents it, exactly as your laws here prevent the 
sale of important steamers here. It may allow it at some future date 
when shipping becomes more liquid. I have no doubt that all 
countries will lift that, and you can buy and sell, but not to-day. 

The Chairman. Then, if the Leviathan had been built in Great 
Britain, and it was in this situation which exists to-day, it would have 
been impossible to have that ship imder the American flag ? 

Mr. Franklin. If the Leviathan had been built in Great Britain, 
and owned by a British shipping firm corporation, during the last 
three years, she could not under any circumstances have been trans- 
ferred without the permission of the British Government; and I do 
not think they would have given the permission. 

The Chairman. Suppose it had been built in Great Britain for 
German interests ? 

Mr. Franklin. If she had been built in Great Britain for German 
interests, she would have been owned by a German company, and 
then she would have fallen under the laws of Germany. 

The Chairman. But she could have flown the German flag ? 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So, it is not a question of where the ship is built, 
but it is a question of what concern owns her ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. The best example of that is the Americkaj 
that is an ex-German ship now owned by the United States and it 
was built by Harlan & Wolfe in Belfast, and was then built for a 
German company, was taken from there and put under the German 
flag, and then taken here. That is a clear example of what you have 
in mind. 

The Chairman. Mr. Franklin, are you a director in any of these 
concerns that were represented at this first conference ? 

Mr. Frankun. Yes; I am a director in the New York Shipbuilding 
Co. 

The Chairman. And are there any other oflScials of the I. M. M 
interested in that concern that you Know of as directors ? 

Mr. Franklin. No other oflicials of the I. M. M. Co., but the 
American International Corporation owned a share in the New York 
Shipbuilding Co., and then two directors on oiu* board, but they are 
not — I mean to say, there are no oflicials. I would like to make it 
perfectly clear, Mr. Chairman, that the New York Shipbuilding Co. 
was not considered by us to do the work prior to the December 3 
meeting. They announced at the December 3 meeting that they 
were not in a position to do the work, and that they were not equipped 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1315 

to do this kind of work; so that that never entered as a factor in any 
sense of the word in this work. 

The Chairman. Now, if my recollection is correct, after having 
read the minutes of these various conferences, would it be accurate 
to say, in the form of a question, that the Newport News, the Bethle- 
hem, the Cramps, and the New York Ship did not show any great 
enthusiasm at this first conference to get this work of reconditioning, 
that is, they did Aot seem to be anxious to do this work. 

Mr. Franklin. Well, the Newport News — my recollection is that 
the Newport News people announced that they did not feel that they 
could take this steamer on down there. The New York Shipbuilding 
Co. took the same position. I think the Bethlehem people showed a 
greater interest, but the Cramps and the Fletchers all felt that the 
lump-simi bid could not be made, and m that the other shipbuilders 
"ftrere in accord; except Mr. Todd and Mr. Morse. 

The Chairman. Mr. Hague at that conference did not favor the 
cost-plus proposal ? 

Mr. Franklin. No. 

The Chairman. He thought that it should be done under a lump 
sum? 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. 

The Chairman. And you agreed with him ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I agreed that if it Could be gotten under the 
lump sum it was a much more desirable wav to do it. 

Tne Chairman. Now, whom did Mr. Mull represent? 

Mr. Franklin. He is the president of the Cramps Co. 

The Chairman. And Mr Powell was there for tne Bethlehem, was 
he not ? 

Mr. FRANKI.IN. Right. 

The Chairman. Mr, Powell did not indicate any willingness, or 
perhaps anxiety, to procure this work at that conference ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; but he, like all the others, was anxious to be 
helpful. He appreciated the national feature of this, and he was in 
favor of the specifications and plans being prepared with a view of 
getting a lump sum bid. He was helpful through the whole thing. 

The Chairman. Why was the proposals sent to the New York Ship, 
and the Newport News, if they had previously stated they would not 
care to bid on this work ? 

Mr. Franklin. It was decided the proposal should be sent out to 
everybody that had attended the meeting, and had been considered 
in the matter; and further than that, they had been very hopeful, 
and might ^ve in a helpful way any time, and their experts were very 
helpful in uiis whole thing. 

The Chairman. Now, as a result of this conference, the experts 
from these various concerns assisted in preparing specifications ? 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, yes; a great many of them did. 

The Chairman. Did they receive any remuneration for that ? 

Mr. Franklin. No. 

The CHAiBBiAN. And does the proposal cover remimeration or re- 
imbursement for the services rendered in that regard, if they should 
happen to be the successful bidder ? 

Mr. Franklin. It was understood that the services the people were 
to render should be free of charge, and that is so stated in the minutes 
that are before you. 



1316 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOlSrS. 

The Chairman. That is, free of charge to the Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Franklin. To anybody. 

The Chairman. In getting ui) these specifications ? 

Mr. Franklin. In assisting in giving their technical knowledge 
and advice. 

The Chairman. That all appears in the minutes t 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. But, in the proposal, being the form of contract, 
was there any condition or clause in there which would reimburse tJiem 
for that service in helping to prepare the specifications, placing their 
experts at the disposal of the Shipping Board, in case one of the firms 
was the successful bidder, for instance 

Mr. Franklin. I do not so think, but I would rather you asked Mr. 
Gibbs that, because he is more familiar; but I do not think that is 
in there, because it was so clearly undertsood it was free of any charge. 

The Chairman. Are you familiar, in a general way, with specifica- 
tions for doing work like this, or is that a matter of detail you do not 
follow ? 

Mr. Franklin. I have seen lots of specifications, but I am not an 
expert on that at all. 

The Chairman. And you did not assist in the preparation of the 
specifications ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not in the slightest. 

The Chairman. Who prepared the form of proposal that was sent 
out to these various concerns ? 

Mr. Franklin. Mr. Gibbs's department. 

The Chairman. And the contract was prepared by your concern, 
too? 

Mr. Franklin. So I understand. 

The Chairman. This booklet containing on the outside cover the 
words, '* International Mercantile Marine Co., amended certificate 
of organization, as amended September 29, 1916," is that the existing 
charter of your concern? 

Mr. Franklin. It is. 

The Chairman. I ask to have that marked and made a part of the 
record. 

(The paper above referred to was marked by the oflicial reporter 
"P. A. S. Franklin Exhibit No. 1'' of this date and will be foimd 
printed in full at the end of this volume.) 

The Chairman. And this chart of the International Mercantile 
Marine and subsidiary companies as of June 1, 1919, which you have 
explained, have there been any changes in these companies smce that 
time, Mr. Franklin ? 

Mr. Franklin. Only a slight change in the fact that we have 
increased our holdings in the George Tnompson Co., and that is the 
only change. 

The Chairman. But you controlled it prior to increasing your 
holdings ? 

Mr. Franklin. This gives us a larger control than before, and that 
is simply a subsidiary company. 

The Chairman. I ask that also be put in the record. 

(The paper above referred to was marked by the official reporter. 
'*P. A. S. Franklin Exhibit No. 2," of this date, and will be foima 
printed in full at the end of this volume.) 



SBIPPrSQ BOABD OPERATIOKS. 1317 

Mr. Franklin. We control those foreign companies entirely. 
The Chairman. Now, this down here [indicating] as running from 
the Atlantic Transport Co. down in the lower right hand comer, the 
New York Shipbuilding Corporation, do you control that company, 
too? 

Mr. Franklin. No; we own about less than a quarter. 
The Chairman. So that on this chart there are 10 subsidiary com- 
panies which you control, and the New York Shipbuilding Corpora- 
tion which you do not control, but own less than a quarter of its stock, 
is that it? 

Mr. Franklin. Each one of those squares show exactly the capital 
of each one of the companies, and exactly what we hold of each one 
of them. 

The Chairman. Now, this appears with reference to the New York 
Shipbuilding ownership, 32,971 shares, 16.5 per cent, that is approxi- 
mately the existing situation to-day, is it ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. We have not changed that. Now 
the same sort of a holding exists, as you see, in the Holland-America 
Line. We do not in any sense of the word control that. 

The Chairman. You do not control that? 

Mr. Franklin. No. We are just shareholders in that. We con- 
trol these companies absolutely [indicating], and those companies 
there [indicating], we own those. Those are the steamship holding 
com>anies. 

The Chairman. I see. 

"Mr. Franklin. That company [indicating], and that company 
[indicating], the New York Shipbuilding Co., and the Holland-America 
Line, are simply investments. 

The Chairman. The Shaw, Savill & Albion Co. (Ltd.), you have 44 
per cent of the original stocl^,^ and 2 per cent of the preference stock 
there, that is not controlled, is it ? 

]Mt. Franklin. That is not a control. 

The Chairman. The Geoi^e Thompson, you have 40 per cent 
management, 20 per cent of the original stock, 8 per cent of the 
preference stock, and you subse()uently increased your holdings ? 

Mr. Franklin. To a majority mterest. 

The Chairman. To a majoiity interest ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The Frederick Leyland & Co. (Ltd.), you own 41 
per cent of the preference, 98 per cent of the original 

Mr. Franklin. That gives us a great majority, as you see. 

The Chairman. The Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. (Ltd.), you 
own 100 per cent? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The British & North Atlantic Steam Navigation 
Co. (Ltd.), you own 100 per cent? 

Mr. Franklin. Right. 

The Chairman. The Atlantic Transport Co. (Ltd.), you own 100 
per cent ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That Belgium company you own 100 per cent? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The CHAiRBiAN. The International Navigation Co. (Ltd.), incor- 
porated in Great Britain, you own 100 per cent? 



1318 SHIFPIK6 BOABD OPSBATIONB. 

Mr. Franklin. Right. 

The Chairman. And the Atlantic Transport Co., you own 100 
per cent ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. 

The Chairman. I ask that that be put into the record. 

Mr. Franklin. And as you can see from that, it ^ves us control. 
We are in control. They do not control us. They nave no control 
whatsoever over us. 

The Chairman. Are you a director in any other shipping concerns ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Or shipbuilding companies? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Or repair concerns ? 

Mr. Franklin. No. 

The Chairman. Now, what is the British committee? 

Mr. Franklin. The British committee is a committee compK>sed 
of the principal people in England, and our interests in England 
who medt and discuss and make recommendations. Their minuter 
are not effective until they are confirmed by our board here. 

The Chairman. Now, are all of the stockholders in the Interna- 
tional Mercantile Marine citizens of the United States ? 

Mr. Franklin. Our stock books show. Our stock record book 
shows about 99 or a little over, per cent; but as you know, our shares 
are on the market here, and you can not do anything except your 
records. You can not go behind your records, but as far as we are 
concerned, we have never heard or know nothing of anything to the 
contraiy. 

The Chairman. Do you know of any interests or influences of 
countries which have mfluenced in any way the operation or the 
policy of the Intemationscl Mercantile Marine so as to effect detri- 
mentally the interests of the American Merchant Marine ? 

Mr. Franklin. I never even seen an intimation of it. There is 
no influence that could be brought to boar against the board or the 
directors of the International Mercantile Marine Co. that would in 
any sense of the word have any influence against the American 
situation. As you see, you have purely Americans on there, and 
they are very much interested in the development of the American 
flag. We are very much critised at the moment by people who are 
not doing anything. 

The Chairman. Those men are also interested in other American 
enterprises ? 

Mr. Franklin. They aie interested in a great many American 
enterprises. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Kolley ? 

Mr. Relley. I do not think so now. 

The Chairman. Mr. Connally ? 

Mr. Conn ALLY. I want to aks Mr. .Franklin one or two questions: 
Mr. Franklin, at the beginning of the testimony, you stated that you 
were a director of this committee during the war. Now, I did not 
get exactly the duties of that committee and their relations to the 
War Department and to the Shipping Board. Now, I understand^ 
during tne war, the Shipping Board borrowed a lot of these vessels^ 
of course, which were really turned over for use by the Quartermaster 
Corps in the matter of transporting troops, chartered vessels, that were 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS, 1319 

taken over by the Shipping Board. Now, did they go through the 
Shipping Board, or did tne Army charter them straight out ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, the vessels that carried the troops, like the 
Leviathan J was manned and operated entirely by the Navy. 

Mr. Conn ALLY. Yes; I know that. 

Mr. Franklin. Tt was turned over by the War Department to the 
Navy, and so were most of the troop transports. The majority of 
the troop transports. Now, there were several transports and some 
of them carrying troops which, in many cases, were manned by the 
Shipping Board; in some cases manned by the Army, and they all 
came from manipulation and from information over the whole 
world, whether it was bringing up nitrate or carrying stuff and food 
to France under our committee. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. That is what I was getting: at. You had nothing 
to do with the ships that were operated by the Navy t 

Mr. Franklin. We had absolutelv nothing to do with the ships 
that were operated by the Navy, unless we were asked to put a car- 
load cargo in them. If they were ships that had any cargo space, 
we might load cargo, and some of the ships that were not manned 
by the Navy which were purely cargo ships, we had control of their 
movements. 

Mr. Conn ALLY. Now, how are settlements made there; did you 
have anything to do with the making of settlements as between the 
Army and Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not the slightest bit. 

ilr. CoNNALLY. Do you know how those matters were handled t 
For instance, take the matter of chartering of a ship, not only charter 
fees, but its return to its owners in the condition in which it was 
received by the Government, and the Shipping Board, and all of 
those matters; who had the jurisdiction and supervision over those 
questions ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, the turning of the ship — you mean from the 
Shipping Board to the owner, or from the Army to the owner ? 

Mr. CoNNALLY. Well, say in the Army to the owner. 

Mr. Fraxkun. Well, the Army to tHe owner: The Army had ap- 
pointed a committee here who sat and made a survey of the ship, 
and the owner, and that was put before this committee. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. His fiews were put before the committee and 
then they tried to reach agreement as to the lump-sum settlement, 
and if they succeeded all right; if not, the thing is pending. 

Mr. Franklin. That is so. We have a great many pending. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. You say the Army had a committee; you mean a 
committee of officers or civilians ? 

Mr. Franklin. Officers, and a few civilians. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. W^ould you mind teUing us about the Shipping 
Board; what its method wasi 

Mr. Franklin. Its method was practically the same, only I think 
they made their adjustment without a committee. I am not sure 
of that. We had no steamer that was returned to us by the Shipping 
Board. Therefore, I am not familiar with that. Our ships were afl 
returned to us by the Army, because they were all passenger and troop 
carrying ships, and were returned to us through this committee. 
Gen. Hmes in Washington, dealing with the matter. 



1320 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. They were then taken over originally by the Army, 
and not by the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; they were requisitioned by the Shipping 
Board first, and then the Shipping Board turned them over to the 
Navy for operation for account of the Army, and then when they 
were through, the Navy turned them back to the Army for surrender 
to the owner. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. Well, then, in this case your settlements were 
made direct with the Army ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; every case we have had the settlement has 
been made with the Army. We have only been able to settle 2 out 
of 11, and we have a tremendous amount of money outstanding. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. Now, the function of your committee, then, was 
largely allocation ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; the function of our committee was to handle 
and manage all the ships under the American flag, or requisitioned, or 
chartered by the American Government, except such ships that were 
under the Navy, and we had absolutely notning to do with those 
that carried troops only, it was our duty to see that the steamers 
were so manipulated to bring up the nitrates, the sugar, all the 
essentials of the whole world, and at the same time get all of the 
supplies to France. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. I wanted to ask you one other question, and I shall 
be through. Now, with reference to the tentative arrangement 
whicli your company had with the Shipping Board for your operation 
of tiie Leviaikan, have any terms been agreed upon ? 

Mr. Franklin. Nothing has been agreed upon, except this agree- 
ment that has been put before you. We have no terms or conditions 
agreed upon for the management or operation of the ship. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. In order words, the charter fee, you do not know 
whether it will be a flat fee ? 

M:r. Franklin. Whether we are to receive managing compensation 
or charter fee, or anything else, it has not been settlea. . 

Mr. CoNNALLY. I believe that is all. 

Mr. Kelley. There are one or two questions that I did not think 
of a moment ago when the chairman asKed me. Your financial con- 
nection with the International Mercantile Co., I take it, comes in 
through the New York Ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir; the American International Corporation is 
a holder of our shares. They also own some New York Ship, but 
that really does not come in to our financial condition. 

Mr. Kelley. But you are not a stockholder, personally, in the 
International Mercantile Marine ? 

Mr. Franklin. I, personally? 

Mr. Kelley. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, yes; I am a shareholder, personally. 

Mr. Kelley. I thought that the list of stockholders, as it appeared 
in the book there, had a list as it stood on the books % Your name 
does not seem to be in the list ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is the charter. Those are not the share- 
holders. Those are the incorporators. I am sorry to say most of 
them have gone to Heaven. 

Mr. Kelley. Of course, being president of the company, you have 
to be a shareholder ? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1321 

Mr. Franklin. I have to be a shareholder, and I am also very glad 
to be a shareholder. 

Mr. Kelley. No doubt. 

Mr. Franklin. I wish more people were shareholders. 

Mr. Kellbt. The stock is very widely distributed now in the 
International Co. ? 

Mr. Franklin. The stock of the International Mercantile Marine 
Co. is increasing. I mean to say it is expanding. Its number of 
shareholders are increasing. 

Mr. Kelley. Now, the business of the International Mercantile 
is the operation of ships, exclusively, is it not ? 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely. 

Mr. Kelley. Now, under what authority can you act as agent of 
the Government for repairing its ships ? 

Mr. Franklin. Under what authority? Well, I think that our 
articles of incorporation gives us the risht. 

Mr. Kelley. Have you had that called to your attention ? 

Mr. Franklin. No. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not know then definitely whether your 
articles are broad enough to permit you to act as agent for repairing 
ships? 

Mr. Franiclin. I should say they are, but I would not like to be 
positive about that. That is a legal matter. If you want any legal 
advice on that we can get it. 

Mr. Kelley. Well, perhaps you may want some legal advice on 
that. 

Mr. Franklin. All right, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Now, the blue prints were sent to the Newport News 
Co., the Cramps, the New York Ship, the Todd Dry Dock Co., the 
Morse Dry Dock Co., the Fletcher Shipyards, the Bethlehem Co., and 
the Boston and Brooklyn Navy Yards. 

Mr. Franklin. Right, sir. Nine. 

Mr. Kelley. But your general impression is, and has been, that 
the four companies, private companies, located outside or away from 
New York, would probably not care to bid ? 

Mr. Franklin. That has been my impression. 

Mr. Kelley. They would leave then the two navy yards and the 
Todd Co. and the Morse Co. and the Fletcher Co. Now, have you 
had any communication from the Secretary of the Navy as to either 
of the navy yards taking on the work ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; but I understood the Shipping Board had 
taken that matter up with the Secretary of the Navy, or had written 
to them that he preferred the work going to the Boston yard. 

Mr. Kelley. So that leaves, if it stays in New York, it would leave 
it practically to the Todd people and the Morse and the Fletcher ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; the only question is whether the Navy 
Department could not see their way clear to take it to the Brooklyn 
Navy Yard, under the circumstances. 

Mr. Kelley. Now, were any of these companies ever by reason 
of financial difficulties or otherwise imable to properly handle it ? 

Mr. Franklin. Any of these ? 

Mr. Kelley. Any of these three ? 
* Mr. Franklin. That you have mentioned ? 

177068— 20— PT 4 6 



1322 SHIPPINO BOABD OPBBATIONS. 

Mr. Kelley. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Franklin. I think they could financially handle it, as far as I 
am concerned — that would be my opinion. 

Mr. Kelley. The Todd Co. could handle it, could they ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. I would say, yes. The 

Mr. Kelley. And could the Aforse Co. handle it ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is my imderstanding, and in my opinion 
they can. That is all I can say. 

Mr. Kelley. They have no difficulties of any kind that would 
make it hard for them to finance it ? 

Mr. Franklin. None that I have heard of. 

Mr. Kelley. And the Fletcher people could handle it, could they? 

Mr. Franklin. In my opinion. 

Mr. Kelley. Are thev large enough, Mr. Franklin, do you think, 
to take care of this whole affair ? 

Mr. Franklin. As I said in the first place my idea was that the 
strongest possible situation could have been tne Cramps and the 
Fletchers, but I believe Fletchers can do it, because they could 
always, and each one of these gentlemen could sublet. 

Mr. Kelley. Fletcher would sublet to Cramps ? 

Mr. Franklin. He could sublet to anybody ne likes. 

Mr. Kelley. In fact, I thought there might have been some 
business arrangement between them which would make it likely 
they would do that. 

Mr. Franklin. Thev have a fairly close friendly relationship, but 
I do not know that they have any business arrangement; but I do 
know that Mr. Fletcher is a director of the Cramps. 

Mr. Kelley. Could Fletchers do the joining work ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say very large percentage of it. They 
have done joining work for us quite satisiactorily. The combination 
that personally 1 felt, when that first started, the best combination 
was the Cramps and the Fletchers, to get the experience and the 
knowledge and the technical experience: scientific experience and 
knowledge combined in both places. 

Mr. Kj:lley. Which is the larger yard, the Fletcher or the Morse? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I would not like to say that. I would not 
like to say that. 

Mr. Kj:lley. Are you familiar with the plant of the Fletchers ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I would not like to say I am familiar 
with any of these plants in anything like a thorough maimer. I 
have been over there. I have seen the plants in a general way, as I 
have some of the other plants. 

Mr. Kelley. And did you satisfy yourself, Mr. Franklin, that the 
Morse people could handle this financially ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would not like to say that I have taken any im- 
portant steps to satisfy myself of that, because I did not consider 
that we ought to go into the financial end of this until the time came 
for the actual bios; but there would have to be certain guarantees 
on this that would all be investigated by us, and before we would 
make a contract with any body on behalf of the Government, we 
would satisfy ourselves that they could carry it out financially. 
Generally speaking, I would say the Morse could carry it out, but 
that would DC a matter that we would take every precaution about. 



SHIPPING BOABD 0PERATI0K8. 1823 

Mr.- Keusey. And putting it on the general list as eligible and on 
general repute 1 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, and the experience we had with them. 

Mr. Kellet. Yourself? 

Mr. Franklin. Myself. 

Mr. Kelley. Does the New York Shipbuilding Co. have any 
connection with the Fletcher Co. in any way ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not in any way at all. 

Mr. Kelley. Do you know whether the Todd people are con- 
nected with the Fletcher people ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would say no, that they are not, but I have no 
actual knowledge on that subject. I have never heard they were, 
and in fact I heard they were not. 

Mr. Kelley. How about the Todd people and the Morse? 

Mr. Franklin. I would make the same reply. 

Mr. Kelley. That is you do not know ? 

Mr. Franklin. I do not know about it. My general information 
is that they are not. 

Mr. Kelley. But after everything has been considered, your 
recommendation to the Shipping Board now would be that it would 
be good either way, or the other navy yards ? 

Mr. Franklin. My recommendation to the Shipping Board 
would be to see what bids they could get, if any, but my preference 
is that the bids and everything else developed, that the situation is 
about on all fours from the cost point of view, that it should go to 
the Navy. If, for any reason, one of the shipbuilding companies 
should make a tender which everybody would feel was exceedingly 
low, why I think that ought to be very darefully considered, but aU 
things being equal, I would give it to the Navy. I would rather see 
the work go to the Navy. 

Mr. Kjelley. Have your personal relations with this company 
that was mentioned awhile ago, the Shewan Co., been such as to 
give you quite a fair knowledge of their ability ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say not any intimate knowledge of their 
ability; I just know it in a general way. 

Mr. Kelley. In your opmion are they as strong people as the 
Morse people ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say for a certain kind of work I would 
unhesitatingly do business with them. I would consider them in 
just as good a position to do certain work as anybody else. 

Mr. Kelley. Is your objection to them that they possibly lack 
the particular skill needed for this sort of work ? 

Mr. Franklin. I have not any objection to them — 

Mr. Kelley. I know, but not having included them in your 
original recommendation ? 

Mr. Franklin. In my opinion they were not staffed, did not 
have the technical people, the scientific people, and the plant to do 
this work. That is only from general Knowledge. The big ship- 
building companies are the people that should have had this work 
if they had been in a position to take it, like the Newport News, 
the Cramps, the New ^rk Ship, Fore River, etc. 

Mr Kelley. But having practically excluded all of them by reason 
of their location and one thing and another — ^I suppose the work has 
really got to be done where you can take care of the ship, and it brings 



1324 SHEPpnrG boaxd oper^tioks. 

it down to three companies located within easy reach of the vessel — 
do you not think it would be wise possibly to let in this other com* 
pany and let them bid on it? 

Mr. Franklin. There is no objection to letting them bid, except the 
feeling that if you had a house to build you would hesitate a long 
while about giving it to somebody that you did not feel had haa 
experience and were as well equipped as somebody else to do the 
business ? 

Mr. Kellet. The largest of these three plants is the Todd plant, I 
suppose ? 

Mr. Franklin. I think so; it is a very good plant. 

Mr. Kellet. Have they had the most extensive experience alsol 

Mr. Franklin. They have had very great experience, and they 
have done some very satisfactory work; and as I say, t\na is lar|;ely 
joiner work; it is not repairs or the construction of a hull, it is joiner 
and interior work. 

Mr. Kelley. The Todd people could do the joiner work themselves, 
I suppose, could they ? 

Mr. Franklin. They have a joiner shop there which is pretty large 
and is a pretty efficient shop. I think tney could do a fair share of 
it, but I do not know that they could do it all. 

Mr. Kellet. As far as you know, there is no arrangement between 
these three companies to parcel out the work whichever one gets the 
contract ? 

Mr. Franklin. I never have heard of it. Personally I was very 
doubtful whether you would ever get a lump-sum bid. 

Mr. Kellet. Then, as agent for the Government, what will you do 

about it ? 

Mr. Franklin. As agent of the Government, we will see what the 
situation is at the time, and if the Navy yard are in line on it at all 
and willing to take it, we will recommend to the Shipping Board that 
it be given to the navy yard, the New York Navjr Yard preferred. 

^fr. KIellet. Your instructions from the Shipping Board preclude 
you from letting a contract to anybody on a lump-sum basis, does 
It not ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would say that our instructions from the Ship- 
ping Board are that we are to act 

Mr. Kellet. I mean on a cost-plus basis. 

Mr. Franklin. The only specific statement that I have heard on 
that was that Judge Payne said, and Mr. Hague yesterday, and they 
both backed it up, that they were very much opposed to the cost-plus 
basis. I would suppose we are not free to even intimate to anybody 
that we might be able to fix the business with them on a cost-plus 
basis. We know that the Shipping Board is opposed to it. 

Mr. Kellet. Inasmuch as tne work can be done in the New York 
Navy Yard at actual cost, without any profit charged up to anybody 
and without any overhead expense being charged up to the ship, why 
is not that the best way to handle this matter? 

Mr. Franklin. Personally I am in favor of the navy yard. 

Mr. Kjillet. The navy yard will build the ship, I suppose, for the 
lowest cost it can be built. Why not turn the ship over to either one 
of the navy yards with specifications and tell them to put it in shape t 



SHIFPIKG BOABD OPBRATIOKS. 1325 

Mr. Franklin. The course of procedure we would follow would be 
that we would wait and see whether we could get any lumpHsum bid 
first. 

Mr. Kelley. Suppose the navy yard estimated lower than your 
lump-sum bid ? What would you do ? 

Mr. Franklin. Give it to the navy yard, without hesitating. 

Mr. B^LLEY. Supposing the navy yard could not finish the work 
within the same time, then what would you do? 

Mr. Franklin. I would be inclined, if it were only a question of 
time of delivery — ^I would be very much inclined to give it to the navy 
yard. 

Mr. K^lley. You mean you think they can do it quicker? 

Mr. Franklin. Not quicker, but I believe they can do it as quickly, 
provided you can assure yourself that the navy yard is fairly free 
irom any work which is going to interfere with it, which we under- 
stand is the case. The navy yard might have some emergency work 
crop up very quickly that would set this aside. 

Mr. Keixey. You understand, of course, as agent for the vShipping 
Board, that if the navy yard made an estimate that would be only 
an estimate, and if it should cost more to do the work you would 
have to pay it 1 

Mr. Franklin. Quite right. 

Mr. Kelley. And, of course, they would do the work at the lowest 
possible cost so far as they are concerned. Now, would you be 
willing to go ahead on that basis and let the navy yard have the 
work, although it might overrun their estimate? 

Air. Franklin. My nurried opinion on that is this, that if their 
estimate is not very much reduced by a lump-sum bid or equaled 
by a lump-sum bid, you might say, I would without hesitating give 
it to the navy vard. That is because of this situation, that the 
steamer is owned by the Government and the nav}'' yard will do the 
work at actual cost, and they would also keep occupied the navy 
yard, which to my mind is an important factor. 

Mr. Kelley. Did you hear Commander Crisp's testimony yester- 
day ? 

Mr. Franklin. I did. 

Mr. Kjelley. Do you recall what he said about the impossibility 
of carrying out a repair contract without extras? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

Mr. Kelley. What is your opinion about that ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, my feeling is that with a repair job as big a» 
this job you will have diflBculty in keeping away from extras. But I 
believe you can keep the extras in such very good control, with speci- 
fications having been drawn as carefully as these have, that your 
extras will be small. They can only be made by absolute agreement. 

Mr. Kelley. Then you do not think that even if you had a lump- 
sum bid it would be greatly increased by extras? 

Mr. Franklin. My feeling is that specifications having been so 
carefully prepared the extras would not be very serious; but on a 

{*ob like this 1 think you have got to expect some extras. I never 
lave seen a big job that did not have them. The whole situation is 
an added reason why, if you can, you should get the navy yard to 
take this on. 

Mr. Kelley. Do you agree with Commander Crisp, or somebody 
who testified here yesterday — I guess it was Mr. Hague — that a rea- 



1326 SHIPPING BOABD OPmUlTIOHS. 

sonable. profit on this ship would run something like a million 
dollars ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I should think a million dollars is a wee bit 
hi£|h, but it is difficult to tell. 

Mr. Kelley. There is not much likelihood, is there, that a lump- 
sum bid, including a million dollars for profit, would be less than the 
actual cost of doing the work in a navy yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. 1 should say not. 

Mr. Kelley. Then why not right off the reel let this contract to 
one or the other of the navy yards? 

Mr. Franklin. I would be in favor of seeing — ^you only have a 
week to wait and see what develops and be guided by the circum- 
stances then. You are not committed to anything. 

Mr. KjiLLEY. That is, you can reject all these bicfa? 

Mr. Franklin. Why, certainly, you can reject them all and give 
it to the Navy. 

Mr. Kelley. Could you reject any of these bids and give it to any 
one of them ? 

Mr. Franklin. That would be rather a different thing. I think 
if anv one of these bidders was honestly deserving the contract you 
could not very well give it to somebody else, but I believe you will 
find that any one oi these bidders would say if you could give this 
to the Navy they would really have no complaint. I do not think 
they would, 

Mr. Kelley. That is all. 

Mr. Hadley. Mr. Franklin, has your company ever filed any sup- 
plemental or amendatorv articles ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would not like to say that. 

Mr. Hadley. I only asked to see whether the articles that you 
identified represent the true situation. 

Mr. Franklin. I asked our secretary this morning for the articles, 
and he gave me those. I do not think they have been supplemented 
in any way. 

Mr. Hadley. So far as you know, the powers of the corporation 
are as stated in the articles that you identified ? 

Mr. Franklin. So far as I know. 

Mr. Hadley. The contract for reconditioning is dated December 
17, 1919? 

Mr. Franklin. December 17. 

Mr. Hadley. So far as the International Mercantile Marine is con- 
cerned in their entering into that contract, was the primary con- 
sideration the reconditioning of the vessel or the option to purchase ? 

Mr. Franklin. The primary consideration was to have this vessd 
for management and operation in our services. We wanted and we 
felt that if we could be associated with the Shipping Board in an 
Active maimer in reconditioning it would result in a steamer that 
would be a more useful and profitable steamer than otherwise. 

Mr. Hadley. I have not examined the contract which was identi- 
fied yesterday, but it carries the option to purchase? 

Mr. Franklin. It carries no direct option to purchase- it simply 
carries the option or preference in connection with the sale — prefer- 
ence in purchase. It does not fix a right to purchase and it does not 
fix a price at which we could buy. 

Mr. Hadley. But it gives you the prior right to purchase, or the 
first option ? 



SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIOKS. 1327 

Mr. Fbanklin. The prior right. That is a perfectly proper and 
fair thing, because if we could get the management of this snip and 
its operation we have a lot of commitments of various kinds and 
descriptions that we would have to go into, and we could not be left 
in the position of having her taken away from us within 30 days. 

Mr. Hadlby. I assume from your testimony that that was a very 
essential feature ofyour contract ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. The management and operation and future use 
of the steamer. 

Mr. Hadley. Had you negotiated in connection with the future of 
the vessel prior to the execution of that contract ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, we had not negotiated very much regarding 
the future of the vessel. The whole ming was really discussed as 
one thing. 

Mr. Hadley. You took it up with the chairman of the Shipping 
Board? 

Mr. Fbanklin. With Judge Payne. 

Mr. Hadley. In September, I think you said ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. In September. 

Mr. Hadley. That was before the Shipping Board had approached 
you on the question of an agency contract for reconditioning ? 

Mr. FiiANKLiN. Well, it was all in one conversation, really. I can 
not say tibat the Shipping Board ever approached us; we approached 
them. 

Mr. Hadley. You approached them regarding the future of the 
vessel^ 

Mr. Fbanklin. The future of the Leviathan; yes. 

Mr. Hadley. And upon that there developed a subsequent course 
of events as indicated in the testimony ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. That is right. 

Mr. Haj)ley. It was on January 3 that you were requested to bid 
on the German vessels ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. We received on January 3 a request from the 
Shipping Board to bid on all and each of the ex-German passenger 
vessels. 

Mr. Hadley. How many were there? 

Mr. Fbanklin. Twenty-eight or thirty. 

Mr. Hadley. And did you bid jointly and severally on them ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. We bid on them all, and we bid on 22 as one lot 
ajid on each one of the 22 severally — 20, 1 think it was. 

Mr. Hadley. And your bids were all rejected? 

Mr. Fbanklin. Well, they were all rejected. 

Mr. Hadley. Was that a general call for bids, if you know, or was 
it submitted to your company alone? 

Mr. Fbanklin. It was a general call. The notice that we received 
was simply a copy of what we understood was sent to. everybody. 

Mr. H^l^y. Do you know whether other bids were submitted 
than your own ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. No other bids were submitted for the Leviathan, 
but other bids were submitted for ships in the list. 

Mr. Hadley. Were there any other bids submitted in gross for 

the lot ? 
Mr. Fbanklin. No other bids submitted for the whole thing. 
Mr. Hadley. When was the auction to be ? 



1328 SHIPPIHa BOARD OPEBAZIOKS. 

Mr. Franklin. The auction was fixed for February 16, and I 
should say the call for that was about two weeks earlier, but I would 
not like to fix the date. 

Mr. Hadley. When did you learn of ;the action of the board with 
respect to your bid ? 

Mr. Franklin. The first bid? 

Mr. Hadley. Yes, air. 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, we did not get anything definite from the 
board. We noticed in the press that the board had decided not to 
accept any of the offers. 

Mr. Hadley. Well, it wasprior to February 15, if that is the date? 

Mr. Frabklin. Prior to February 16 we noticed it in the press 
and prior to a week before that we wrote to the board and asked 
them whether they would not return our check for $750,000 that 
they had. 

Mr. Hadley. Did the board at anv time write and advise you 
that they had rejected your bid andf decided to proceed with an 
auction ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, they did not acknowledge our letter or our 
check or anything else. We finally got them to send us back the 
money. 

Mr. Hadley. Were you advised by the board in any authentic 
way as to the reasons that moved tne board to adopt the plan of 
going to an auction basis ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; we were not informed by them. We under- 
stood that the reason was that they thought the auction would re- 
sult in better prices, and I had a talk with Judge Payne and he con- 
firmed that. He thought that better prices could be secured by a 
Eublic auction than the offers received and thought it might be a 
etter way to deal with it. 

Mr. Hadley. I believe you expressed the opinion earlier in your 
testimony that a better price would have been obtained than would 
otherwise be obtainable if the original bids on the January 3 call 
had been accepted ? 

Mr. Franklin. I think if they had accepted the bid on the Jan- 
uary 3 call, opened on January 20, they would have netted more out 
of the steamers than they will ever get. 

Mr. Hadley. When did the bar of injunction become operative? 

Mr. Franklin. My recollection is that it became operative about 
the 14th or 15th day of February; just before the auction sale on 
the 16th of February. 

Mr. Hadley. You spoke of certain objections having been raised 
which resulted in the remedy of injunction, through the press or 
otherwise, I believe. Were those objections, so far as you know, 
directed to the auction sale or did they also go to the acceptance of 
prior bids submitted by individual bidders? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I think they were directed to the auction 
sale, because the Shipping Board had announced in the press that 
they had rejected the previous bids. That is only an opinion on my 
part. 

Mr. Hadley. Did you ever learn of any protests against the pro- 
posed action of the board in receiving and accepting bids under the 
January 3 caU ? 



SHIPPING BOABD OPBRATIOKS. 1329 

Mr. Franklin. I did not see or hear any objection to that until 
just a little before the February 16 auction. 

Mr. Hadley. No public announcement was ever made of the 
character of the bids received imder that call ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; the Shipping Board announced on the 20th 
day of January that they had received bids, and gave some infor- 
mation about the bids, and I heard no objection raised by anybody. 

Mr. Hadley. Did they publish the amount of the bids in any given 
cases as received ? 

Mr. Franklin. They published the bid on the Leviathanj and my 
recollection is that they mentioned pretty closely, if not giving the 
actual figure, thegross sum bid for all the ships. 

Mr. BUdley. Was the published bid the actual bid on the Levi- 
aihanf 

Mr. Franklin. The published bid on the Leviathan was the actual 
bid for the Leviathan^ coupled with a lot of other steamers, but it waa 
not the actual bid on the Leviathan by herself. 

Mr. Hadley. If it had been the actual bid on the Leviatlian alone, 
I would have asked you what it was, but I do not care to ask that. 

Mr. Franklin. I do not mind telling you, if you want to know. 
I would not object to submitting oiu* letter making the proposal to 
you. The letter is a document covering the three dmerent proposals. 

Mr. Hadley. If it is entirely agreeable to you then, I would be glad 
for vou to state the individual bid which you made upon the Leviathan, 

lir. Franklin. The individual bid on the Leviathan by herself was 
three and a half million, and on the Leviathan, coupled with some 
other shipS; $4,000,000. We, of course, had to estimate the cost of 
repairs on the Leviathan in addition to that bid. 

Mr. Kjilley. Mr. Franklin, I think you expressed a somewhat 
pessimistic feeling about the probability of getting lump-sum bids 
on the Leviathan f 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Kelley. What is that based on ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, my feeling about it is that it is such a tre- 
mendous job and so complicated that I have been very doubtful 
whether anybody would give us a lump-sum bid for the whole thing 
without some clauses about the diflference in wages, or something oi 
that sort. 

Mr. Kelley. Have representatives of any of these companies who 
have been furnished with blue prints intimated that that would be 
the case ? 

Mr. Franklin. No. 

Mr. Kelley. And your feeling grows out of this viewpoint about 
the matter rather than anything that has been said to you ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; and the general situation. It is very difficult 
to-day to make a shipbuilding contract with anybody that has not 
a clause in it that if there is an mcrease in wages you have to pay them, 
that the contract is based on the scale of wages attached, and if there 
is an increase you have to pay it. 

Mr. Kjelley. Do you know whether or not the Shipping Board 
has a number df other ships that must be put in condition ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; they have. 

Mr. Kelley. Is it possible that some of these bidders might be 
waiting for the smaller ships to come along ? 



1330 SHIPPING BOABD OPBBAXIOH& 

Mr. Franklin. That might be true, but I must admit that had not 
impressed itself on my mind. 

Mr. BIellbt. So far as you know, have any proposals been put out 
for reconditioning the other ships ? 

Mr. Frankun. I do not know anything about that. A good many 
of the ships, or three or four of them, recently have gone to the navy 
^ard instead of going outside; and that, I think, is a governing factor 
m connection with expecting further work on the part of the ship- 
builder, because he would have a perfect right to feel that he could 
not count very much on that, because it ought be given to the navy 
yards. 

Mr. Kellby. Would you feel inclined to put in a clause safe- 
guarding the bidder against an advance in labor? 

Mr. FitANKUN. I would not be in favor of putting that in except 
jas a last resort. 

Mr. Kellet. Unless the navy yard refused to take it ? 

Mr. Franklin. Unless the navy yard refused to take it and we 
could not get the navy yard, imder certain circumstances or con- 
ditions — one navy yard or the other — to take it 

Mr. Kelley. It is my understanding from what you say then that 
imless you get a lump-sum bid without conditions ^ou will award the 
contract to one of the navy yards if they will take it ? 

Mr. Franklin. Of course, so far as we are concerned, we have no 
power to award a contract. 

Mr. Kelley. But you will recommend that it be awarded to one 
of the navy yards ? 

Mr. Franklin. My personal feeling is that I would rather see 
this work go to the navy yard, and therefore if there is nothing in the 
bids that is exceedingly attractive as compared to anything we have 
in mind I would rather see it go to the navy yard. 

Mr. Kelley. You would not recommend the acceptance of a bid 
imless it was a straight out lump-sum bid, would you ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; I would not recommend the acceptance of a 
bid unless it was a straight out lump sum bid; and if it had any con- 
ditions regarding the ebb and flow of the price of labor or anything 
of that kmd it would be a great deterrent, and I would feel very 
wiuch more in favor of giving it to the navy yard. On anything 
like all fours I would be very much in favor of giving it to a navy yard. 

The Chairman. Mr. Franklin, why did not your concern itself 
seek to get a contract to recondition this ship? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, in the first place, we have not any yard. 
We could not do work on that kind. That is not our business. 

The Chairman. Well, suppose your contract contained a clause 
permitting you to sublet this work to whomever you felt competent 
to do it; would you not then, having the staff, the experience, the 
knowledge, and the organization, have entered into a contract to 
recondition this ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. That kind of a contract would not interest me in 
the slightest. 

The Chairman. Well, you got a contract to act as agent for the 
Shipping Board, under an agreement that if the work was done you 
assumed no risk, did you not? 

Mr. Franklin. Practically so. 



SHIPPINO BOABD OPEBATIONS. 1331 

The Chairman. You are paid $15,000 a month for supervisory 
work, and the bills were to be paid by the Shipping Board which 
Tou contracted as agent. Now, if you had secured Sie contract to 
recondition the Leviathan, with permission to sublet to whomever 
you deemed competent to do the work, you could still have had the 
option in that contract for operation when the work was completed 
and the option to purchase, could you not? 

Mr. Frankun. I presume that might have been possible. 

The Chairman. I mean, that woula not have interfered with that 
feature of it. 

Mr. Franklin. I should not think so; no. 

The Chairman. And you could also have called in these various 
jBnns for suggestions as to specifications, so as to find out what 
should have been done, could you not? And you could also have 
ascertained, by means of calling for proposals for subcontracts, 
approximately what the work would cost. Now, in view of that, 
what is there about that sort of arrangement that would lead you 
not to have any interest in that sort of contract ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, because I think it might result in a heavy 
loss to us. It is not our business, and as I have said before, I am 
doubtful whether anybody can make a lump-sum contract on this 
ship that would be satisfactory, and if we had had the ship to repair 
ourselves, if we had owned the ship, we would have proceeded, or 
had in mind proceeding, on other lines. I consider it would have 
been an unattractive business to us. 

The Chairman. You are the only concern on this coast that has 
the oiganization and the experience for this sort of problem, are you 
not? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I suppose we imagine so; we think so. 

The Chairman. You heard Mr. Hague, of the Shipping Board, 
testify to that fact yesterday? Do you know of any other concern 
that IS equipped as you are to act as agent for this work? 

Mr. Franklin. I do not. 

The Chairman. Now, if you have the organization, the equipment, 
and the experience for actmg as agent for this work, why comd you 
not make a contract with the Shipping Board to do this work your- 
self? In other words, why could not your organization get aft the 
information, as you have "done, upon which to base specifications 
and secure the requisite knowledge upon which to make a bid your- 
self for the work? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, you might just as well ask an architect 
whether he would not make a bid on the constructioi\ of a building. 
We are in a position here similar to that of an architect. It is not 
our business to take contracts of that kind. We have not the fore- 
men; we have not the shops; we have not anything. We would 
have to sublet all that. Now, we believe that can be sublet to better 
advantage, if you are going to sublet it, through the people who would 
have the supervision over that and the foremen and whose business 
it is to do that. Wo are not in the contracting business in any sense 
of the word, and this is a contractor's business. It is just like build- 
ing a house. We occupy a very similar position to that of an archi- 
tect. We do not occupy the position of a contractor. I think wo 
can be of more use to you in triat capacity than in the other. 



1332 SHIPPING BOABD OPSRATIONS. 

The Chairman. In other words, in conducting this work of re- 
conditioning the Leviaihnn for operation by you, and with the first 
option for purchase, you would rather act as agent than as principal 
in the worK ? 

Mr. Franklin. As far as the first option for purchase is con- 
cerned, it has nothing to do with mv reply, for the reason that we 
are not contractors in that sense of the word, and would not take the 
work on under any circumstances. We believe it is to the interest 
of the Government, and we arc satisfied, as far as the ship is con- 
cerned, to have us in the present position rather than as a contractor 
to do the work for which we are not in the market at all. We give 
out our own ships. 

The Chairman. You stated with reference to the negotiations 
and the tentative plati of procedure which you had in mind that you 
thought if you owned the ship yourself you would enter into some 
arrangement with the Cramp yard and tne Fletcher yard to do the 
work? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

The Chairman. Well now, if you take the contract to recondition 
this ship you would still be in a position to make that arrangement 
just as if you were the owner, would you not? 

Mr. Franklin. No, we would not. That arra^igement was not 
on a fixed figure. That would have been a cost-plus aiTangement, 
practically, and there would have been no risk under heaven, and 
there is no compensatio:i w? could get that would justify our stand- 
ing in between the Government and the cost-plus contractor. 

The Chairman. You moan you would bo willing to make that 
further arrangement if you were owner; but you would not want to 
make that arrangement if you were the contractor or if you were an 
agent for the Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. L^ANKLiN. I think it should be avoided as representing in 
any sense of the word the Government, particularly knowing the 
Shipping Board's views and the Government's views about a cost- 
plus contract. I think it should be avoided, and I think very rightly 
so, and that is the reason I leaned very mucn to the Navy. 

The Chairman. Was the opening of these bids postponed from 
May 1 to May 15? 

Mr. Franklin. I never heard of it. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether it was proposed at first 
that the bids should be opened on May 1 ? 

Mr. Franklin. I never heard May 1 mentioned in connection 
with that, to tell you the truth. 

The Chairman. Now, assuming that this call for bids results in 
no bids being received, and assuming further that the Navy Depart- 
ment can be induced to permit this vessel to be reconditioned at the 
Brooklyn Navy Yard \\ath arrangements for dr}'^ docking at Boston 
if it is found advisable and necessary, would you still think it neces- 
sary for this contract with the I. M. M. to continue? 

Mr. Franklin. I think it is desirable to have it continued, from 
the point of view of the work and the efiiciencv of the ship here- 
after. I think that the compensation of the 1. M. M. Co. for that is 
small as compared to the knowledge they can put into the situation. 
The Chairman. But the knowledge that they are putting into the 
situation is the knowledge acquired in part from private yards. 



SHIPFING BOABD OPBBATIOKS. 1333 

Mr. Franklin. No, I do not say that— acquired in part from 
private yards, yes, but it is in connection with tne various questions 
that have come up on the future efficiency of the ship as well. 

The Chairman. Would you mind stating some question of that 
«ort ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, the questions in connection with the eauip- 
ment of the ship, the furnishing, the supplies of all kinds, the problems 
that are coming up about the oil burning — innumerable questions 
^wUl arise in connection with this ship. 

The Chairman. Are they not all covered by the specifications ? 

Mr. Franklin. A great many of them are covered by the speci- 
fications, but there will be lots of other thin^ that will arise that 
^ai not be covered by the specifications. For instance, there are 
•certain things that are not even — that will not be put out. There 
are certain features, certain supplies, and equipment, that will be 

1)urchased by the I. M. M. Co. free of any commission or charge — 
ots of them — all your linen, china, cooking utensils, and so on. 

The Chairman. That could be done still without the necessity of 
a contract or agency if the work was done in the navy yard, could 
it not? 

Mr. Franklin. My reply to that is that even if you could have 
that work done by somebody who has had experience in operating 
ships and carrying passengers, you would get such a result that the 
amount of money would oe very small as compared to the chances 
of a mistake. 

The Chairman. Assuming that the navy yard is also recondition- 
ing other ships, smaller, oi course, than the Leviaihany and not so 
palatial in equipment and appointment, do you not think that the 
iiavy yards will be able to recondition those ships without the neces- 
sitv oi a concern like yours being agent or looking after those matters ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I think tne ship would be better recon- 
ditioned if they had a concern like ours to look out for the matter 
than if they had not. 

The Chairman. Well, in one sense, Mr. Franklin, the Shipping 
Board are reconditioning this ship for your benefit, are they not? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, i think if they only had our benefit in mind 
the ship would never be reconditioned. I do not think the Shipping 
Board is doing anything for us. 

The Chairman. No. Then let us take the other side of it. ^n one 
sense you are acting as agent in the reconditioning of this ship for the 
benefit of the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, it is in one sense of the word for the benefit 
of the I. M. M. Co., but we do not go into this so much for the benefit 
as because we are better equipped to handle this steamer successfully. 
If you will read over the minutes of that meeting, the whole spirit of 
that meeting was not to benefit anybody; it was to handle this ship, to 
do it credit, to be a credit to the American flag and to the American 
Government. The question of doPars and cents in this thing has not 
prompted us at all. 

The Chairman. Yes; 1 notice in the minutes of that first meeting 
that the spirit seemed to prevail generally that the representatives oi 
these various yards seemed prompted by the highest motives, and 
there seemed to be no attempt to secure person^ or pecuniary ad- 
vantages. 



1334 SHIPPING BOABD OPBRATIOlfrS. 

Mr. Franklin. You ought to couple the steamship company also 
with the highest motives there, as well as the representatives. 

The Chairman. I say, the gentlemen who were at that first con- 
ference. That general spirit seemed to prevail, from the minutes of 
the meeting, nut have you considered the question of whether the 
navy yard could properly undertake the work of reconditioning this 
great ship, with this great corporation of yours standing over it as an 
agent, with the powers that you have imder your contract, as to 
whether or not the navy yard could function properly and freely in 
doing that work ? 

Mr. Frankj.in. Well, that is for the navy yard, I should say, to 
give their opinion on. »f they want to do the work in the best possible 
manner, they can, and F believe they will want to do the work, and I 
believe in the end they will welcome the cooperation and assistance of 
our corporation. 

The Chairman. Assume further that no bids are received as a result 
of these proposals, and assume still further that the Navy Yard is 
unwilling to undertake the work, would vou be willing to take over 
the ship for operation and do the work of reconditioning yourself ? 

Mr. Khanklin. Do you mean, to name a lump sum or to have any 
OMtirnato which we would in any way guarantee? 

Tlip (hr airman. Yos. 

Mr. KuANKiJN. No, sir. 

Tlu* ('If AIRMAN. As the result of the knowledge and experience of 
your concern, together with the assistance you have received from 
\}wH(* various concerns who have had representatives present at the 
conferences and helping to prepare si)ecifications and making other 
helpful suggestions, would you be able, do you think, to fix a maxi- 
mum beyond which the cost of this reconditioning might not go ? 

Mr. FifiANKLiN. Do you mean that we should guarantee that it 
would not exceed a certain price i 

The Chairman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Well, if there are no bids and it can not be done 
by the Navy Department, what is your solution of the problem ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, of course, i think that is rather a doubtful 
case, because T think you could get the Navy Department to do it. 
But if there are no bids and it can not be done by the Navy Depart- 
ment, I would tri/ to work out some arrangement with some of the 
shipbuilding outfits which would fix a fee or fixed profit that they are 
to get, and then do it on cost after that, so that it would not be 
cost plus. 

The Chairman, ft would be cost plus a fixed fee? 

Mr. Franklin. It would be cost plus a fixed fee. And then you 
would have to keep up your inspection, which you would have to have 
as thorough as possible, to see that no labor was put on that was not 
absolutely essential. Now, that is a hurried reply, because that is a 
matter that would have to be carefully weighed and thought over. 
We would probably have several conferences on a situation of that 
kind. 

The Chairman. Do you think, if this ship was to be reconditioned 
by the Navy Department, following the specifications that have been 
prepared, that the amount of your compensation as agent which you 
nave already received and which under the contract you would con- 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIOKS. 1335 

tinue to receive until the completion of the work would be money 
'well expended ? 

Mr. Franklin. I do. 

The Chairman. In other words, you think that the reconditioning 
for the future existence and opeartion of the vessel would be that 
much better done? 

Mr. Franklin. I think so. I think this is a matter of such great 
magnitude, and the future of the ship to such a large extent depends 
upon it — ^her earning capacity and her ability to go — that the very 
small compensation that we get in the matter is not worth talking 
about. 

The Chairman. You would not have to exercise as close super- 
vision, nor would you require such a large force for inspection purposes 
or otherwise, if the work was done by the Navy Department as if it 
were done by a private concern, would you ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say you would have to be guided by cir- 
cumstances on that. You would have to see how the Navy proceeds 
with the work. You would have to see how much inspection the 
work required. You would certainly avoid all kinds of duplication 
in keeping time and everything of that sort. If you were doing it 
with an outside contractor on the same basis that you propose to do 
it with the Navy you would have to have a very careful check on the 
time and on the tools and the time the tools were used. I assume the 
Navy would have its own check on the time, and there would be a 
great deal of money saved in that way. Of course, on a lump-sum 
contract you would not have to do that, but you have said if we are 
not able to get a lump-sum contract from the contractor. 

The Chairman. I am assuming in this question that it is to be done 
by the Navy Department. 

Mr. Franklin. I understand that; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. If this work is started immediately, or as soon as it 
can be started after the bids are open and the award is made, when 
would you naturally expect the work to be completed by a private 
concern ? 

Mr. Franklin. The opinion I have formed, rightly or wrongly, is 
that it will take a year from the time whoever is to do the work ac- 
tively gets on the job. I think it will take a year. Then I think the 
ship should be taken up to the Boston Navy Yard, regardless of who 
does the work or anythmg else. As far as we are concerned we would 
not be prepared — ^well, I say, we would recommend against putting 
any passengers on that ship under any circumstances without dry- 
dockmg her. Therefore she has got to go the Boston Navy Yard to 
be diy docked, have her tail shafts drawn and everything investigated. 
I do not think there is anything on the ship that will require any work 
in the. dry dock for more than a matter oi four or five days, but I do 
not think the Government or anybody else would be justified in put- 
ting a passenger on that steamer without dry docking her. All tnese 
steamers have to be dry docked. We dry dock every ship every year 
and sometimes twice a year — frequently twice a year. 

The Chairman. In your negotiations with Judge rayne at the outset 
was it not intended, either on your part or on the part of the Shipping 
Board, that you should be agent for other ships than the LeviathaTi^ 

Mr. f^NKLiN. Yes, sir. 



1336 8HIPPIKG BOAfiD 0PEBATI0H8. 

The Chairman. What prompted the elimination of the other ships! 

Mr. Franklin. WeU, tne ships that I remember, that were men- 
tioned in connection with the contract, were the Agamemnon and the 
Mount Vernon, with a view of their bein£^ refitted and run with this 
steamer. The Mount Vernon is out on the Pacific, and nothing has 
been done about the Agamemnon. 

The Chairman. Do you know why when you came to sign the con- 
tract on December 17 — what was it that led you to drop the other ship f 

Mr. Franklin. Because at that time they were not sure about tne 
future and how long the other ships would be requried, as I remember 
it, and it was suggested that we make the contract for this ship with 
the understanding that if they wanted us to take any other ^ips — 
I think the ships I have mentioned are the correct ones — that the 
charge for those ships would be $5,000 a month. 

The Chairman. Were there not three other ships? 

Mr. Franklin. The Agam^emnon, the Mount Vernon, and the 
Oeorge Washington were discussed, but the George Washington was in 
rather a little different class, because she was discussed on a some- 
what slower route. 

The Chairman. Have you applied to have those ships turned over 
to you for operation ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; we have applied time and time again. 

The Chairman. Have you ever got to a point where you expect 
to get them ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; we do not expect anything. 

The Chairman. And there are no negotiations pending with the 
board? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, we made a bid to the board — ^we received a 
communication from the board about a month or a month and a half 
ago outlining a basis on which they asked whether we would recon- 
dition the ships under an agreement whereby we had the right to 
purchase at a fixed price as soon as the board got authority to sell. 
We made them an oner on eight steamers on that basis, to which we 
have never had any reply. 

The Chairman. That is, to act as agent? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, we were really buying the ships. The con- 
tract fixed the price, as soon as the board gets authority to sell, at 
which the ship woidd then have to be sold to us, and we undertook 
to take the ship right over and put her into condition immediately. 
Then if at the time her repairs nave been completed the board had 
not the authority to sell us the ships, we would manage and operate 
the ships for account of the board and ourselves, the profit or loss 
to be divided in accordance with the investment, the board's invest- 
ment bein^ the stated price of the ships and our investment being 
the cost of repairs. We made them a bid on eight steamers on that 
basis. 

The Chairman. Eliminating from consideration the court proceed- 
ings which have prevented the sale of the Leviathan, in your opinion 
would that or not be a better way to dispose of the Leviathan prob- 
lem — some such arrangement as that? Do you think it would ? 

Mr. Franklin. WeU, I am doubtful. I am very doubtful whether 
you would get anybody to-day, in the present financial situation and 
the tremendously heavy amount of capital required to handle that 
ship — ^whether you would get anybody to imdertake it in the first 



SHimKa BOABD OPERATIONS. 1837 

place. I am also doubtful whether the title to that ship ought to 
pass from the United States. She is an adjunct to your Navy and 
your Army, and she is not, in one sense ol the word, looking at it 
to-day, a commercial problem. She has got to be considered in two 
classes as one, national and commercial. 

The Chairman. That does not apply to these smaller craft? 

Mr. Franklin. I do not consider that it does. That is only a 
matter of opinion. 

The Chairman. Mr. Franklin, I do not think I have asked you 
what experience you have had in shipping matters? 

Mr. Franklin. I have been in shipping since 19 years of age, and 
I am pretty old now. I went into shipping in 1889. 

The Chairman. And what concerns have you been connected with ? 

Mr. Franklin. With the Atlantic Transportation Co., of West 
Vircinia, and then with the International Mercantile Marine Co. 

The (Mairman. Always in the United States ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

The Chairman. And always on this coast ? 

Mr. Franklin. Always on this coast. 

The Chairman. And generally in this section of the coast ? 

Mr. Franklin. I was located in Baltimore for a year or two, and 
then came over here and have been here since. 

The Chairman. And in connection with concerns operating ships 
to all parts of the world ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, we have no services from here to the Far 
East, to Australia or New Zealand. We have steamers occasionally 
to South America, Jbut only as rather a tramping business. But we 
have services from England to Australia and New Zealand. 

The Chairman. And that experience has been solely in managing 
and operating these steamships ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, and the financial end of it. 

The Chairman. And financing steamship corporations? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

The Chairman. I think that is all, Mr. Franklin. 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Chairman, one or two questions have occurred 
to me while Mr. Franklin was testifjdng, since I came in. 

The Chairman. Very well, you may proceed, Mr. Steele. 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Frankhn, 1 did not nave the advantage of hear- 
ing your testimony until about half an hour ago. While you were 
testuying several questions occurred to me. 

You stated that in your judgment the money was well expended 
that was now being expended by the Government under your arran- 
gement with it. If the Government, however, authorized the im- 
mediate sale of the vessel without reconditioning of it at all, would 
the money now expended upon it add to its salable value ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should think so, yes. 

Mr. Steele. Would it add to the extent of the expenditure act- 
ually incurred ? 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, fully. 

Mr. Steele. Fully that ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say yes. 

17706&— 20— FT 4 7 



1S38 SHIPPING BOABD 0PEBATI0N8. 

Mr. Steele. In your judgment would it be to the best advan- 
tage of the Government to sell the ship without reconditioning it or 
to go ahead and recondition it and incur that extra expense ? 

Mr. Frankun. I think my reply to that would have to be about 
as I outlined it a few minutes ago. If the Government could sell 
this steamer, and get somebody else to recondition her, I think it 
would be an advantageous contract for the Government, but if jon 
will look at this from a national point of view I doubt whether it is 
wise for the Government to lose title to this ship. 

Mr. Steele. You referred a few minutes ago to the amount of 
capital required to purchase and finance this ship. In your judg- 
ment, could a purchaser be obtained at this time for the ship if it 
were put up for immediate sale ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I doubt it. If the ship were put up for 
immediate sale, we would give it very careful consideration, but 
imder the present conditions and circumstances it is a matter that 
would reqmre a great deal of thought. 

Mr. CoNNALLT. There is one question I overlooked awhile ago, 
Mr. Franklin. You were speaking about in case these bids were all 
submitted and it was found that the navy yard proposition was 
desirable, that it would be satisfactory, possibly, to the bidders, and 
so on. As a matter of law, however, do you not retain the right to 
reject any and all of these bids ? 

Mr. Franklin. My understanding is that the contract gives you 
the right to reject any one or all the bids. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. And as a matter of right and law, the board can 
reject them all and turn right around and make a private contract 
with any one of the individual concerns ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is exactly right. The Question that I was 
answering was a little different. You have a rignt to reject them. 

Mr. KIelley. Mr. Franklin, just to clear up one question I asked 
awhile ago, suppose the estimate of the navy yard was lower than that 
of a private contractor. You would have no hesitation in awarding 
the contract to the navy yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not the slightest. 

Mr. Kelley. Although if the navy yard's estimate were too low, 
you would have to pay more later on for the ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. 

Mr. Kjilley. Still you would not hesitate at all to award the con- 
tract to the navy yard on the estimate 1 

Mr. Franklin. I would not; no. 

Mr. Kelley. That is all. 

Mr. Franklin. I think there is a great advantage in having this 
done by the navy yard — great satisfaction. I would much prefer 
seeing her done by the Navy. 

Mr. Kelley. Are you so fully convinced of that fact that you have 
practically made up your mind to reject all the bids and award the 
contract to the navy yard ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. Of course, you understand we have not 
the power to reject — ^1 mean I would not reconmiend it. My mind is 
not made up at all. I am only strongly in favor of the navy yard. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not see any serious difficulty at all in a private 
party supervising the work done by the Government ? 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOIfrS. 1339 

Mr. FsANKLiK. Well, I do not see any difficulty. Of course, it is a 
matter for the Government. It is a matter for the navy yard to make 
up its mind. There is no doubt that the ship is owned by the Gov- 
ernment, and if the navy yard is doing the work, which is the Govern- 
ment doing the work, it does seem a little douotf ul whether a third 
party might be taken in. But my feeling is strongly that that third 
partv would be very advantageous and would be helpful, and I should 
thinK the Navy Department would rather welcome it than otherwise. 

Mr. KJELLEY. Of course, all you could do. if there were any contro- 
versy, would be to report to the Shipping tioard ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is all. 

Mr. Ejsllet. And they would adjust the matter with the Navy 
Department ? 

Mr. Fbanklin. That is all. We could only call the attention of the 
Shipping Board to the things that we thought were not being properly 
done, and the Shipping Board would say to us, we thank you, but 
that is to be done tnat way. 

Mr. Ejbllet. Do you think that the amount of money you have 
been paid up to the present time is a fair compensation for the services 
which you have rendered up to the present time ? 

lifr. Franklin. Well, as far as we are concerned, w-^e have made a 
bargain and we are entirely satisfied. It is a very difficult thing, and 
we can not tell what our services are worth in this thing. I under- 
stand an architect was asked what he would charge, and he said he 
would charge $100,000 down, and then so much per cent. I ^ess he 
would want about 5 per cent. That is beginning to measure now our 
services ought to be measured. We are not getting anything like 
that. We have not gone into this with the idea of making any money 
out of it. As I told Judge Payne, it was a question whether we 
should do it for nothing or get a fee. I did not want to do it for 
nothing, because I did not think that anything you offered to do for 
nothing is right from a business point of view, and then I think a 
^eat amount of going over our books woidd have to be done, which 
18 wron^. 

Mr. Kblley. It is evident the Shipping Board had in mind that. 
your services would be required, whether the navy yard or some pri- 
vate contractor did the work? 

Mr. Frankj.in. Evidently so. That is for the Shipping Board 
to say- 
Mr. Kelley. But that is a matter that could be adjusted between 
you and the Shipping Board, possibly ? 

Mr. Franklin. Quite right. Our position, as a general proposi- 
tion, is that we have to put ourselves at the service of the Shipping 
Board, and we want to serve the Shipping Board. If we are of no 
use to them there is nothing we can do. 

Mr. Kellet. I presimie that even the navy yard would be glad 
to know from week to week or from day to day your taste as to the 
matter of tinting, decorating, color scnemes, and all that — or any 
other operator that they mignt be fitting up the ship for. 

Mr. Franklin. All the details. 

Mr. Kellet. It would be like a landlord finishing up an apartment 
to the satisfaction of the incoming tenant. 

Mr. Fbanklin. That is right. 



1840 SHIPPINO BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Kelley. It would not make so very much diflFerence either 
way, except the matter of 8100,000 or so for the next eight months. 

Mr. Franklin. That is right— 8 or 12 months. Of course, if the 
Navy feci they can do it in eight months, as far as we are concerned 
we will be delighted, but I am a little doubtful about the eight 
months. They Know their business better thai I do. There is not 
very much to be accomplish^ in getting this ship out in January or 
February. I would like to see her brought out in March if it is 
possible, and put uiidcr her trial trip in March. She ought to have 
a dry docking and a good trial trip. It will take a couple of voyages 
before they can burn oil economicallv. 

Mr. Kelley. Wliat makes you think, Mr. Franklin, that there 
might be a large amount of extras on this ship under these specifica- 
tions ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, my feeling is that these' specifications have 
been very carefully drawn, and I am hopeful that they have been so 
efficiently drawn that there would not be, if anybody accepted them, 
any very large amount of extras. As I said before, there are always 

extras. 

Mr. Kelley. Is there any considerable amount of speculation as 
to the proper location of tanks or anything of that sort that might 
have to be changed ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say not changed to any great extent. 
But that is a matter that Mr. Gibbs can give you better information 
on than I can. I would not believe that that would result in any 
very heavy extras. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not think there is any uncertainty in this 
installation of the oil because of the magnitude of this ship, the size 
of the ship, that would lead possibly to a great many extras, do yout 
Mr. Franklin. I do not oelieve the extras there would be very 
heavy. I think you would find that with those specifications there 
is not any very great change that could be made. 

Mr. Kelley. You are already putting in five different systems 
there in one boiler as an experiment. That goes to show you are not 
very clear. 

Mr. Franklin. But that really has nothing to do with the tanks 
or the pumping or the piping, it only has to do with the burner and 
to fit it to suit the boiler. That is not such a big job. 

Mr. Kelley. But the size of that ship raises a good many ques- 
tions that would be otherwise quite settled? 

Mr. FRANKI.IN. Yes; but the size of your extras would also be 
measured by the size of the ship and the amount of money you are 
putting on it. If you are paying a thousand dollars for a thing and 
getting extras of $250 you feel that you are getting very heavy extras, 
but if you are spending $10,000,000 and getting some hundreds of 
thousands of extras it is not so bad. 

Mr. Kelley. What guarantv will your contractor make as to 
those oil burners being successful ? 

Mr. Franklin. That I would not like to sav, but I doubt if he 
would make much of a guaranty. If he puts them in in accordance 
with your specifications and constructs your tanks in accordance 
with your specifications, and everything, I doubt if he would give 
much of a guaranty. 



SHXPPVSQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 1841 

Mr. Eellet. And then if it does not work right and changes have 
to be made that is an extra beyond all question ? 

Mr. Franklin. If it did not work and had to be changed later, 
and if it was not covered by his contract, of course you would have to 
make the changes at your own expense. 

Mr. Ejbllet. You agree with Commander Crisp, who testified here 
yesterdav I imagine, that this provision in the specifications that 
nothing be allowed for extras really has no force ? 

Mr. Franklin. I do not like to say it has no force — 

Mr. Kxlley. On a repair job like this ? 

Mr. Franklin. I say extras could not be run in on you except by 
mutual agreement, but if you found something was not going to be 
right unless you agreed to an extra, you would have to agree to it. 
In other words, they ought not to be able to run in extras on their 
oi^oi motion. 

Mr. Kelley. Who determines the value of an extra service ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should say that if an extra service was thought 
to be necessary the contractor would take that up with us, and then 
we would submit that to the Shipping Board with our recommenda- 
tion, and if they approved it it would be agreed to. 

Mr. Kelley. Well, you are almost forced to approve, are you not, 
where the progress of the ship is delayed ? 

Mr. Franklin, There are lots of thmgs conceivable that you might 
be forced to approve. 

Mr. E^ELLEY. What would be the earning capacity of this ship per 
day — the receipts per day ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, if that ship were out to-day she would be 
making a tremendous sum of money. It would be difficult to say 
what. 

Mr. Kelley. Give us a rough estimate. 

Mr. Franklin.* Well, she ought to make $300,000 or $400,000 on a 
round voyage. 

Mr. Kelley. So if it were a question of delaying the finishing of the 
ship you would not haggle long over the question of an extra? You 
could not afford to, could you f 

Mr. Franklin. If it comes down to a vital question you could not 
help yurself . 

Mr. Kelley. So really the contractor has you "on the hip'^ as to 
extras, completely? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, you have reduced that to a minimum, or 
reduced it as far as it can be, by having the specifications very care- 
fuUy drawn. That is the first thine. 

^ Mr. Ejilley. If the Government does the work itseU nearly all that 
diflicultv is avoided ? 

Mr. Franklin. Your extras mieht not develop on anything that 
would delay the construction at all. 

Mr. Kelley. As a rule that i^ where they do occur, is it not ? 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, no. 

Mr. Kelley. When they get into a repair job, do they not find that 
there is some vital thing in there which hitches on to what they are 
trying to do ? 

Mr. Franklin. As a general proposition it does not develop into a 
delay. It is a question of whetner it is desirable to do it this way or 
that way. 



1342 SHIPPmO BOABD 0PERAXI0K8. 

Mr. Kelley. Xow, as the agent of the Government and having all 
those possibilities staring you in the face, why is it not the sSest 
course for the Government, with two well-organized plants right at 
hand, either one of which can take this ship — why is it not the safest 
course to go ahead and let the Government do it ? 

Mr. Franklin. My feeling is as I have said before, I think the 
safest course on this ship is to have it done at the Brooklyn Navv 
Yard. . y -. 

Mr. Kelley. Then why go on with any further delay ? Why not 
cancel these proposals and simply make arrangements with the 
Secretary of the Navy for this ship to be repaired and put in condition 
at cost ? 

Mr. Franklin. The only reason I can see for not pursuing that 
course is that these proposals ure due on next Saturday, and I doubt 
if you will make any time or save anything, and you might just as 
well have that information. Further than that, 1 think the ship- 
builders who have worked on this thing are entitled to that. 

Mr. Kelley. Was there any complaint from either Government 
yard that they were not able to make bids from specifications ? 

Mr. Franklin. I did not hear that. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not know whether or not the Boston yard did 

in j)articular i 

Mr. Franklin. I did not hear that at all. I heard the commander 
Hay y(»Ht(»rday the specifications and plans were the best he has ever 

Mr. Kelley. He said they were the best he had seen around New 
York lately. 

Mr. Franklin. I thought he said the best he had ever seen. 

Mr. Kelley. He limited that in quite an important way, I think — 
an<l in commercial business, he said. 

Mr. Franklin. Oh, yes; not naval specifications. Anyway, the 
navy yard found them satisfactory and capable of making bids on 
thein, and the commercial people found them satisfactory for bidding 
i)iirp()H(»H. I do not think you would find the Boston yard would 
feel <lifTerently. 

Mr. Kelley. The naval constructors from Boston were here and 
Went over the ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. My understanding is they have been here fre- 
(juently^ 

Mr. Kelley. Is it your understanding they intended to submit a 
bid to be opened next Saturday ? 

Mr. Franklin. My understanding was they were working on an 
{•stimate. I would not like to say anything more definite than that. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not feel that because of the pressure whidi 
a contractor could put on you in the matter of extras you would 
rather be in his power on this ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. I will put that in a little different way. If this 
were our steamer and we could get a lump-sum bid I would not be 
afraid of the extras. That is the point. If this were our own prop- 
erty I would not be afraid of the extras. 

Mr. Kelley. If you could get a lump-sum bid, if you owned the 
ship, you would be willing to make the contract under these specifi- 
cations and take your chances on being held up on extras ? 

Mr. Franklin. That is right. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIOKS. 1343 

Mr. Kelley. I take it from all you have said that your judgment 
is that the best thing for the Government to do is to have the work 
done at one or the other of the navy yards ? 

Mr. Franbxin. I think under all the circumstances the best thing 
for the Government is to have the work done at one of the navy yards. 

Mr. Kelley. Of course you, being the a^ent of the Government and 
having great influence now with the Shippmg Board, that is probably 
iwrhat wQl happen ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would not like to say that would happen, because 
after everything has developed next Saturday we will give every- 
thing cardful consideration and make our recommendation on our 
best judginent at that time. Personally, from a corporation point of 
view, I think the Government would be in a better position to have 
the work done at the navy yard. 

Mr. Kelley. From your talks with contractors vou do not find 
anybody especially eager to undertake this on a lump-sum basis, 
anyhow ? 

Mr. Franklin. I have never heard of anybody very eager to take 
it on a lump sum. But I have had very few tafks with contractors. 

Mr. Kelley. If you were a contractor and had to take this on a 
lump sum, considering the magnitude of the job and all, how much 
would you increase your margin of profit in order to be sure to be on 
the safe side ^ 

Mr. Franklin. Mv object would be certainly not to make less 
than 10 per cent profit on it. 

Mr. Kelley. You would not want to make less than 10 per cent on 
any job, would you ? 

Mr. Franki.in. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. But on this kind of job you might want to double 
that, to be safe ? 

Mr. Franklin. T would be very careful to see that m^jr estimates 
allowed for the magnitude of the job and the difficulties that we 
mi^ht encounter, etc., and assure a 10 per cent profit. 

Mr. Kjilley. Then you would naturally expect that these bids 
would be high ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would say, just about on the lines that we have 
discussed. I do not think you could expect anybody to take this 
unless he was pretty sure of a profit. 

Mr. Kelley. Of course, the Navy Department would not have to 
figure on that at all. 

Mr. Franklin. The Government would be sure they were only 
raying cost, which is a very important thing to all those responsible. 
lisit IS the way I feel about it. 

Mr. Ejeslley. And the work would, of course, be equally well done 
by the Navy as by these private people? 

* Mr. Franklin. 1 do not see why the Navy should not do it equally 
as well. 

Mr. Kelley. That is their reputation with the other ships, is it 
not? 

Mr. Franklin. The other ships have not been in our charge. 
I have heard various reports which I do not know anything about. 

Mr. Steele. Have you any experience in overlooking the work 
done by the navy yard; that is, in comparison with the work done 
under private contractors ? 



1^^ 
Thi 



1344 SHIFPmG BOABB OPBBATEOira. 

Mr. Franklin. No. 

Mr. Kelley. Is the work, on the whole, done as economically at 
the nayv yard as by private contractors ? 

Mr. Kranklin. I have not the slightest idea about that. That 
would be a matter for the Navy ana private contractors — parallel 
bills on some of our ships, and we have never had any work aone by 
the Naw. 

Mr. Steele. And you are not able to speak with any knowledge 
of your own on that subject? 

Mr. Franklin. Not the slightest. 

(Thereupon, at 1.30 o^cIock p. m., a recess was taken until 2.30 
o'clock p. m.) 

AFTER RECESS. 

The committee resumed at 2.30 o'clock p, m., pursuant to recess. 

Present: Representatives Walsh (chairman), Kelley, Hadley, 
Steele, and Connally. 

The Chairman. The committee will please come to order, and I 
will ask Mr. Gibbs to come around and be sworn. 

TESTIHOITT OF MB. W. F. GIBBS, CHIEF OF CONSTETTCTIOir, 
IVTEENATIOHAL MEECAHTILE MAEIVE CO., ITEW YOEK. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 

The Chairman. You will please give your name? 

Mr. GiBBS. William Francis Gibbs. 

The Chairman. Are you associated with the International Mer- 
cantile Marine Co. ? 

Mr. Gibbs. I am. 

The Chairman. In what capacity ? 

Mr. Gibbs. As chief of construction. 

The Chairman. How long have you been with that concern ? 

Mr. Gibbs. As chief of construction since March, 1918, and before 
that and since I was in practice as consulting marine engineer and 
naval architect I have been doing work for them off and on. 

The Chairman. Have you been connected with any other firm? 

Mr. Gibbs. Not having to do with naval architecture. 

The Chairman. To whom do you report in the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Gibbs. To Mr. Franklin, tne president. 

The Chairman. You report to the president? 

Mr. Gibbs. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. When first were you consulted by Mr. Franklin, 
or any other official of the I. M. M., with reference to the recon- 
ditionmg of the steamship Leviathan ? 

Mr. Gibbs. The matter was discussed with me at about the same 
time as Mr. Franklin took it up with the authorities in Washington. 
He said, if I remember correctly, this morning that it was in the 
early part of September, 1919; and in all the discussions since that 
time 1 have either been present or the matter has been talked over 
with xne. 

The Chairman. Were you present at any of the conferences held 
with Judge Payne of the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Gibbs. Yes; I was present at one or two. 



SJUPVIJNG BOABD OPBRATIOKS. 1345 

The Chaibman. Did you have anything to do with determining 
mrhether the I. M. M. should act as agent or have any supervisory 
control over this work ? 

Mr. GiBBs. I did not. 

The Chaibman. Were you present at the conference held on 
December 3 ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I was. 

The Chaibman. Just in a general way will you state your recollec- 
tion of what was determined upon at that conference? 

Mr. GiBBS. As developed this morning, that conference was called 
in accordance with a telegraphic invitation, and the problem was 
stated to the shipbuilders that were called together. It was sug- 
gested that due to the importance of the work from an American 
xnerchant marine point of view that we wanted to get the very best 
advice we could: and that we wanted that these various concerns 
should go over the situation with us and attempt to develop the best 
course of procedure in connection with the work. It was determined, 
after a great deal of discussion, that in view of the fact that two 
people there, Messrs. Morse and Todd, believed that a lump sum 
Did was possible, that plans and specifications should be prepared 
with a view to getting a lump sum bid. At that meeting the question 
of a lump sum bid as against a cost plus contract or cost plus a fixed 
fee was thoroughly gone into, and I think I pointed out that to pre- 
pare the plans and specifications necessary for a lump sum bid 
would be a tremendous proposition in connection with that ship, 
because we did not know anything about that ship. 

We did not know anything about the properties of the ship at all. 
In other words, if you come right down to the basis of the whole 
ship design, in the case of a ship of that size it depends on the under- 
water shape of the hull. That is, the shape of the hull that is in the 
water. We had no more idea what the shape of that hull was under 
the water than in the case of any other ship about which we knew 
nothing. I knew from our experience with other vessels, and par- 
ticularly with large vessels, that we would have to loiow a great 
deal about that siiDJect, and it meant if we were to find that out and 
all other details of the ship necessary to make up a lump sum bid, it 
would take a very long time. Our thought was that it might be 
possible to expedite the work on some other basis. 

The Chairman. You say, if I may interrupt you 

Mr. GiBBs. By all means. 

The Chairman. You say it was necessary to know the shape of 
the hull; do you mean the inside shape of the hull or the inside 
condition ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No; not the inside condition or shape. I say we had 
first to know the shape of the under-water hull. 

The Chairman. Of the under-water hull ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes. In other words, the shape of that part of the 
vessel that is in contact with the water in which it floats. 

Mr. Kbllet. Do you mean shape or condition? 

Mr. GiBBS. I mean shape. 

Mr. Kellet. All right. 

Mr. GiBBS. Some one has suggested the form. I will say the form. 

The Chairman. You may proceed with your statement. 



1346 SHIPPINa BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. GiBBs. I pointed out that in order to learn that, and to learn 
the other characteristics about the inside of the ship, its structure, 
and so forth, it could onl^ be done after a careful surrey, and that 
then we would have to write the specifications and prepare the plans, 
and that it would take a very long time, because no work of estimating 
nor of obtaining bids could start until we had had all that work done 
and it was handed over to the people to bid on. To illustrate what 
I mean, if we had wanted to expedite that work to the maximimi — 
in other words, assiune for the sake of argument that we had a 
limited time to do the job in and that it was very important to com- 
plete it at a particular time, and take one element of the situation, 
and that is the electrical system on the ship. The electrical system on 
the ship consists of r^(\ distinct and separate systems. They are, for 
illustration, the electric lighting on the ship, and the electric annun- 
ciator system for the staterooms, to tell the stewards when somebody 
wants them in the rooms; and the electric telegraph between the 
bridge and the engine room, and the other electrical systems that 
happen to be on that ship, 50 in all. 

>i we wanted to expedite that to the maximum, the normal pro- 
cedure would be to survey the first of those systems and immediately 
put that to bidders and let them make a start while we were sur- 
veying the next system, and so on. Tn order to get a liunp sum bid 
it was necessary to make a survey and make plans of the 56 electrical 
systems on the ship, and so on for the whole of the ship. That thing 
would have to be repeated in a great number of cases all through the 
specifications, and that was one of the reasons that made it such a 
comparatively long time to prepare the specifications, becasuse of the 
size of the sliip and not knowing anything about it beforehand. 

The Chairman. How long it did take for preparation of specifi- 
cations ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That meeting was held on the 3d day of December, 
and on the 12th day of April we invited bids. 

The Chairman. From the 3d day of December to the 12th day of 
April was occupied in preparing specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

The Chairman. How did you ascertain the shape or form of the 
hull below the water line ? 

Mr. GiBBS. We had to measure it from the inside 

The Chairman (interposing). From the inside of the ship? 

Mr. GiBBS. From the inside of the ship. The method you use for 
that is this: You take the ship, 921 feet, or as it happened to be in that 
case exactly 921 .8 feet on the water line, and you divide that into 20 
sections. Then at each one of those sections you go on the inside of 
the ship and measure the width of the ship at the water line and at 
given distances below the water line. Then you lay that out on a 
orawing, and to make a long storv short the result of that is finally 
you get the shape of the ship on those 20 sections. 

The Chairman. What relation did the ship's shape or form of the 
hull below the water line bear to the work which was necessary to be 
done in reconditioning the ship ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Unless we knew the under-water shape of the hull we 
could not tell what the stability of the ship would be when completed. 
We could not tell what the tnm would be; that is, the line at which 
the ship would float; whether the bow would be lower than the stem 



SHTPPIKG BOARD OPERATIONS. 1347 

or the stem would be lower than the bow when we put in oil fuel 
'tanks, because those oil fuel tanks were going in in a different posi- 
tion from that of the coal bunkers to a certain e:!^tent, and furthermore, 
nve had to know the stability of the ship exactly, because unless we 
knew that we could not put m those oil fuel tanks for the reason that 
^we might put them in a position in which when they were empty the 
ship would be run into and water let into those tanks, and that would 
heel the ship over so as to make it unsafe. 

We had to investigate that before we added any weights to the 
-ship. Anything you add to a ship you add weight; for instance, 
the installation of stateroom eq^uipment, or of bathroom, or heating 
systems, all add weight to a ship. You have to know the center of 
gravity, and what the stability of the ship is, before you start that 
-work, Decause otherwise you might put them in a place which would 
finally make the ship unsafe when finished. 

The CHArRMAN. Can you ascertain from an inside examination the 
-shape or form of hulls sufficiently accurately for that purpose ? 

Mr. Gibes. Yes; we can. And that is because, as you will see, 
the only thing between you and the water on the outside when you 
get next to the skin of the ship on the inside, is about 1 inch of steel, 
and you have to include that 1 inch of steel in your calculations and 
you will get the outside of the vessel. If you measure your distance 
on the inside, and then add to that the thickness of the shell, you get 
tihe outside distance. In the case of the Leviatlian that total width 
is 100 feet. 

The Chairman. Is that the only way it can be ascertained? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is the only way unless the ship were dry docked, 
and of course we could not dry-dock her. The expense of putting 
her in dry-dock for that purpose would be very great, and the cost oi 
doing the work in this way would be very much less than the cost of 
taking the ship to dry-dock and putting her in. 

The Chairman. Could you have procured that information as to 
those measurements by the use of divers ? 

Mr. GiBBs. No; because the great difficulty is that you have got 
to have a fixed point on the outside of the snip to measure from if 
you are going to get its shape from the outside. If you are in a dry- 
dock you measure between the wall of the dock ana the wall of the 
ship. In the case of a diver, the water is so dirty that he can not 
see anything after he gets down about 20 feet, as it is as black as 
midnight, and he could not make any measurements that would be 
-w^orth anything. 

The Chairman. As I understand you, as the result of those inside 
measurements you have secured a plan of the under-water form of 
the entire hull of the Leviathan ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. I have one here if you would like to 
see it? 

The Chairman. Did you ascertain, by the use of divers or other 
means, whether there were any structures below the water line near 
the keel on the outside ? 

Mr. GiBBs. We did. 

The Chairman. Are there any ? 

Mr. GiBBS. We wanted to find out if there were bilge keels. 

The Chairman. Are there any? 



1348 SHIFFIHG BOABD OPBBATIOHS. 

Mr. 61BB8. There are none. I say that because we were not able 
to discover any with divers. A diver went down and made a careful 
examination, although in the nature of the case he could not cover 
the whole thing, but I am reasonably sure there are none, because 
they are not in the place where they would be if there were any. 

The Chairman. Have you made any tests of tlie vessel to ascer- 
tain what her stability is in her present condition? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. Before we touched the ship, or before^ we 
took her over, we put in hand-inclining experiments. That is an 
experiment by which with a ship in a Known condition you move 
weights from side to side and note the inclination of the ship by the 
movement of those weights. Then you ^o through a ratner loDg 
calculation to determine the center of gravity, and we find the center 
of gravity of the ship. Determination of t£at center of gravity de- 
pends on the under-water shape of the hull again. While we had a 
general idea and made an estimate which came very close to the 
actual position of the center of gravity, we were not able to get that 
until we completed taking off alT the Imes, which has only been com^ 
pleted in the last week, approximately. 

The Chaibman. As the result of this conference of December 3 
certain committees were appointed to cooperate in the preparation 
of specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is right. 

The Chairman. And you were the chairman of each committee? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes. 

The Chairman. There were two committees, were there? 

Mr. GiBBS. There were. 

The Chairman. Just what did the representatives of these various 
shipping concerns who served on that committee do in assisting you 
in preparing specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBs. There were two committees, as you have suggested. 
One of the committees had to do with the general reconditioning of the 
ship. That is to say, with the essential passenger fittings, renewal 
of passenger fittings that had been torn out, and kindred work of 
that kind. The other committee had to do with the installation of 
oil fuel. On the oil fuel committee there was a representative of the 
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., one of the Todd Ship- 
yards Corporation, and one of the Cramp Ship & Engine Building Co., 
and myself. Of those men the Cramp representative dealt exclusively 
with changes to the hull of the ship required by putting in fuel oil 
tanks and structural changes; the Todd Shipyards Corporation 
representative and the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.'s 
representative dealt exclusively with the piping and pumps and 
burner arrangements, and things of that kind. 

On the other committee there was the representative of the New 
York Shipbuilding Corporation, of the Cramp Ship & Engine Building 
Co., and of the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, and then one 
representative each of the Todd, Morse, and Fletcher companies. 
The New York Shipbuilding representative had to do with electrica] 
work. He was an expert electrician. The Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation's representative had to do with the joiner work ana 
kindred work of that kind. And the Cramp representative had to 
do with the plumbing. Then oiu* organization dealt with steam 
heating and ventilating; hull engineering, as it is called. That is to 



SHTPPING BOABD OPERAXIOKS. 1849 

say, scuppers, the port lights, and all work necessary to bring these 
various departments into relation. 

Tten the representatives of the repair yards were there to consult 
and advise as to the best method of doing the work where there was 
a cheaper way. In other words, if there was a question about the 

Erocess of doing any particular job, they advised with us as to the 
est method of getting it done as cheaply as possible and still as 
efficiently as one could do it. For instance, a case of that kind came 
up in connection with the plumbing, and it was a question there 
whether we would use the Melded joint on the pipe or a flange joint 
rolled into the flange. We sat down with them and the general con- 
sensus of opinion was that a rolled hand joint was the cheapest and 
best thing to do. That is an illustration ot what they were there for. 

The Chairman. Do you mean to say that the repair yard men 
assisted in ascertaining whether some work which the representatives 
of those larger plants had proposed could be done in a cheaper manner 
than what the larger plants suggested ? 

Mr. GiBBs. In other words, they had a vast experience with repair 
work aside from new work. In the case of the large yards, they are 
used to doing new work. There is a difference when it comes to the 
actual fabrication of work whether it is new work and you can cut 
the cloth to suit yourself, or it is repair work and you have to consider 
the existing structure. The repair yards in many cases, by reason of 
their experience in dealing with work of a repau* natm*e previously, 
were able to give us hints as to how to do a thing in the best way and 
in the most economical manner. It is just a wrinkle of the trade, 
and that is all. 

The Chairman. Did those men who represented the various private 
yards go aboard ship and make a personal inspection and measure- 
ments and calculations, and so fortn ? 

Mr. GiBBS. They did; practically all of them. The repair people 
were on the ship, and the representatives of the shipyards were there 
practically contmuously. In other words, the shipyards loaned these 
men without compensation — ^loaned all their siervices — and in the 
case of some of the yards, like Bethlehem and the New York Ship- 
building Corporation, they loaned more than one man. They would 
send their top man. In tne case of Bethlehem, they sent theu* assist- 
ant on naval architecture, who has had long experience with these 
things, and then would send other men particularly experienced in 
the work they were doing that week. 

The Chaibman. Did they have offices aboard the ship ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. They used a stateroom in which to keep 
their papers and data. 

The CShaibman. As a construction man, which is the more difficult 

Eroblem, in vour judgment, the reconditioning of the Leviathan in 
er present form, as 3ie is now, to the condition she was in before 
being taken over for war purposes, or constructing a ship new from 
plans and specifications and models and everything to work from ? 

Mr.. GiBBS. Well, the work on the Leviaihan is infinitely more diffi- 
cult. I am in a good position to say as to that, because we have 
designed ships of almost the identical size — in fact, a little bit bigger 
than the L^naihan — and one job just followed the other, and I am 
very clear on the two things. 



1350 SHIPPIIN^Q BOABD OPERATIOISES. 

The Chaibman. What ships have you designed larger than the 
Leviathan i 

Mr. GiBBs. Those ships designed a thousand feet long that the 
Shipping Board spoke of some tune ago. 

The (&AIEMAN. They were actually designed, were they ? 

Mr. GiBBs. They are. 

The Chaibman. Specifications prepared ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Not final and complete, but all the necessary informa- 
tion has been prepared by which the specifications could be finally 
prepared. 

The Chairman. They were designed by the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Deseed by me. 

The Chaibman. For the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No ; I designed them originally for the I. M. M. They 
have been in process about four years. 

The Chaibman. After this work which you have been describing^ 
was done, who prepared the specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBs. We did. 

The Chaibman. These committees, do you mean? 

Mr. GiBBs. Myself and assistants. None of the Shipping Board 
representatives had anything to do, nor did they know anything 
about any of the business clauses, as I call them, of the specifications. 
In other words, title 1 of the specifications, as you probably know 
by now, consists almost entirely of business clauses. That provide* 
for the form of the bids, the responsibility of the agent, and the 
various things that the contractor has to do to complv with the 
orders issued, and to see that the contractor conforms with the speci- 
fications. That part of it — in other words, title 1 — the various rep- 
resentatives from the shipyards never saw, nor had anything to ao 
with the preparation of it. The only thing that the shipyards rep- 
resentatives nad anything to do with was the actual techmcal details. 
If you will go through these specifications, you will find, especially 
in the electrical specifications, page after page of detailed descrip- 
tions of items of work. That the shipyard representatives had to 
do with, but they never had anything whatever to do with any other 
part of it. 

The Chaibman. Did you have anything to do with selecting the 
firms that the proposals for bids were sent to ? 

Mr. GiBBS. 1 was at the discussion that selected them. 

The Chaibman. Did you make any suggestions as to selecting any 
of the concerns. 

Mr. GiBBs. I yould say yes to that, because I was there and my 
opinion was asked. 

The Chairman. Are you famiUar with the various firms about 
New York Harbor and in this general territory here ? 

Mr. GiBBS. In a general way. 

The Chairman. Aie there any firms in this locality to whom these 
specifications and proposals were not sent that you think were com- 
petent to bid upon the work and to imdertake it? 

Mr. GiBBS. There are none. 

The Chairman. Are you familiar with the Fletcher yard ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; and I say that now in a general way and not 
because I have made any detailed examination of the yards. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1351 

The Chairman. When you say there are none others you say that 
in a general way ? 

Mr. GiBBS. leSy sir; I make that statement in a general way. 

The Chairman. Are you familiar with the Morse yard in a general 
way? 

Mr. Gibes. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And of the yards of the New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; I am very famiUar with them. 

The Chairman. Is it your opinion that the specifications are so 
drawn as to preclude the possibility of large claims for extras ? . 

Mr. GiBBs. Let me just answer that in a bit of roundabout way 
and put before you exactly what was in my mind in connection witn 
that. 

The Chairman. You may proceed. 

Mr. GiBBS. The specifications are drawn so that no contractor can 
possibly take this contract believing that he can take it at one price 
and make his profit on the contract out of possible extras. That is 
impossible. 

The Chairman. It is impossible for him to beHeve that or impos- 
sible for him to do it, which ? 

Mr. GiBBS. It is impossible for him to make a profit on that basis. 
The specifications are drawn so that they prevent as far as possible 
extra charges, and there is a provision — 1 think I better just read the 
ckuse, which states that, because it covers the situation pretty fully. 

The Chairman. I wish you would. 

Air. GiBBS. I am reading from page 6, section 2, under the title 
"Form of bids," and it is as follows: 

Bids to be submitted is triplicate in a lump sum for all work herein or hereinafter 
specified or implied, the said lump simi to include all charges of whatsoever nature 
for the services and facilities required or necessary in connection with the successful 
prosecution of the work and to produce a workable ship in all its parts and appurte- 
Qftaces. Such changes as are reauired by the agents to make the ship and all its 
parts workable will be performed without extra cost, the intent being to prevent 
absolutely extra charges. 

The Chairman. That is the form ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is the statement in the specifications. Now. 
{urthemiore, we have a provision in the specincations, and I will 
find it if I may, because I think it will clear this matter up. 

The Chairman. You may do so. 

Mr. GiBBs. On page 16, second paragraph from the bottom, under 
the title ** Right to have work done by other contractors,'' there is 
this provision: 

The agents reserve the light to have repairs, alterations, or additions to this steamer 
vhich are not included in these specincations, performed by other contractors at 

ttiytime. 

Now you see we have those two provisions in the specifications. 
And, in the first place, we have provided that these people have got to 
give us a ship workable in eXl its parts according to our ideas of what 
18 workable. And they have got to make changes; we contemplate 
changes and those changes are to be made as necessary in our opmion 
to turn out a workable ship in all its parts. And suppose you take 
tlie case of a ship that is workable in all its parts, but for some reason 
vewant to make a change in design. Take, for example, a case where, 



1352 SHIFPIHa BOABD OPERiLTIOVS. 

we will say. a large steamer comes out from the other side that has a 
ladies' smoking room, which would be an imiovation in the Atlantic 
passenger ships, and yet the popularity of that innovation might be 
such as to make us considerputting it on the Leviaikan, althoi^h no 
plan is there to fit it up. We will then say that this is a change we 
want made. The contractor would say: But this is not a part of a 
workable ship. The ship will work without that. We would then 
say: Well, we want that. And we get out the necessary specifica- 
tions for that smoking room for women, and we go to the contractors 
here in the port of New York and ask for bids, in lump sum, for doing 
that work. There is no way on earth that the contractor on the 
vessel, the lump sum contractor on the vessesl I mean, could wax 
fat on that basis because he has no direct competition, for, in fact, he 
is in direct competition with everybody else. We can have that work 
done by some other contractor. And it was our purpose in putting 
that in that we would warn contractors of just such a situation. I 
do not say that there might not be any extras at all, but I do say that 
it would be a very dangerous thing indeed for any contractor to 
imdertake this contract in the hope that he would make money on 
extras, because he might not have any extras to perform. 

The Chairman. Is that clause the standard form of clause for 
contracts ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No; I never saw it before. 

The Chairman. Either one of them ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Neither one of them. 

The Chairman. While the specifications mav be so drawn as to 
require extra work to be done because of possible changes which may 
be decided upon hereafter, they are so drafted as not to permit the 
contractors who take the contract under this lump sum arrangement 
to maintain a claim for that extra work; is that it? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it exactly. 

The Chairman. And if you decide on changes or alterations or 
additions later, after the contract has been awarded, which are not 
specified or implied in the specifications that work may be done by 
other contractors. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

The Chairman. And while it will be extra work and call for extra 
expense, it will not permit a firm who should get the contract to add 
to the amount at wnich it agreed to do the work ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; unless he might come in competition with other 
contractors on this work and have it awarded to him as the lowest 
bidder. But he would be an independent contractor on that work 
then. What we meant to say, and I had intended in these specifica- 
tions if carried out by private contractors to make the rule that no 
extra work could be done by the contractor for the general work. In 
other words, to bar him out entirely from any hope of extra work, and 
to have that extra work a matter of competition between the remain- 
ingcontractors. 

The Chairman. Are the specifications so drawn in your judgment 
as to preclude the likelihood of some work being done oy a contractor 
or a subcontractor, and that work then having to be torn out in order 
for some other requirement of the contract to be done? For in- 
stance, take the putting in of plumbing or joining work, and then you 
find that something else has to be done which should have been done 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. *^ 1353 

firsty and that work has to be torn out. would that work permit of 

£he payment of extras, or is that possible under these specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is not possible, and I will cover it by reading to 

you from the description in the specifications. At the bottom of 

; page 15, imder the caption, ''Orderly processes,'' the specifications 

Vsay this: 

i* The operatioDB of the work hereunder shall be performed by the contractor in an 
rd^ly and efficient manner to best expedite the general work, and the agent shall 
tave the right to direct what operations shajl be performed in sequence to obtain 
tioB end. But in the absence oi such direction the contractor shall not be relieved 
i^>m regponsibility for expeditious and orderly performance of the work. 

In other words, under that clause if the contractor is putting in 

limbing work, and to put in his plumbing work he has to do the 

jdiner work first to prevent tearing out the joiner work, or vice versa, 

p can direct how he shall do that. In other words, if we see him 

Pl'oceeding to do something that we know is out of order and will have 

t4- come out to allow something else to be installed in the vessel, we 

tfave the right to prevent it. 

» The Chairman. Suppose he does it at your order and then you find 

^•ut that you have ordered it done in the reverse order, and it is neces- 

;iary to tear it out so that it will have to be done over again, will he 

('pot then be in a position to claim extras ? 

Mr. GiBBS. We would not entertain a claim for extras, because, if 

"^^iio contractor is not satisfied with the direction we give him for the 

^Tderly performance of the work, he will have to tell us at the time. 

^ The Chairman. Suppose he is satisfied, but later it is foimd that 

that you were mistaken; that the other thing should have been done 

first, but that the contractor was perfectly satisfied to accept your 

direction, and he went on with the work and installed whatever was 

involved, and then later on you should come along and find that that 

has all got to be taken out, that you have made some mistake, and 

something else must be put in first; that the work must be taken out 

and put back again, would the contractor then be in a position to 

claim extras ? 

Mr. GiBBS. It is conceivable that a case might arise where he would 
be in a position to claim extras. But in that case the method of pro- 
cedure would be as I have outlined heretofore. 

The Chairman. Have any firms in this locality apphed to you for 
specifications and for an opportimity to submit a bid on this work, 
outside of the six or seven to whom the proposals for bids were 
sent? 

Mr. GiBBS. Informally; yes. 

The Chairman. Which ones ? 

Mr. GiBBS. The Messrs. Shewan. 

The Chairman. Did you furnish them with specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Can I recount what took place and relieve you of any 
possible misunderstanding ? I think you will have the whole transac- 
tion in mind if you will permit me to proceed in that way. 

The Chairman. You may go ahead and relate it. 

Mr. GiBBS. About a week or 10 days after we had invited bids 
from these various contractors, a Mr. Smith, representing the Messrs. 
Shewan, called to see me. I was out and he had some conversation 
with my brother, and then he came back a little later to see me. 

1770e&— 20-PT 4 8 



1354 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

He said that the Messrs. Shewan had not been invited to bid, and he 
wanted them to have an opportunity to bid, and that he wanted plans 
and specifications. He said that they felt particularly a^neved 
because they felt there was discrimination; tnat they felt that the 
size of their yard and their equipment^ and so forth, and the number 
of their dry docks was such as to put them in a comparative class 
with the others. My recollection is that he said he had about half the 
number of docks the Morse Drv Dock Co. had., if I am not mistaken. 
I pointed out to him that there was no idea of discrimination at all: 
that as far as the Messrs. Shewan went we had the highest regard 
for them. But that we were in this position in respect to this work, 
that any move that we made in the way of the invitation we gave 
other people to come in necessitated, as Mr. Hague pointed out in 
his testimony, that if they were the low bidders they would get the 
work. I said to him that I did not feel with their experience it was 
such as to justify their taking work of this magnitucle. I said, *'li 

1)lans and specifications are sent to you, are you prepared to. make a 
ump-sum Did?** He said, ^*No; we can not make a lump-sum 
bid. Ho said, '^This puts a new light on it. I understood that there 
was a feeling of discrimination, and I am going to see Mr. Shewan. 
I would like very much to make an appointment for you to see Mr. 
Shewan to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock." I said, ''That is quite 
satisfactory to us/* 

Well, Mr. Chairman, I omitted one thing and would like to go back: 
He asked me to give him plans and specifications, as I stated, but I 
replied that I was not at liberty to give hito the plans and specifica- 
tions unless with the approval of the Shipping Board, through Mr. 
Hague, who is the man appointed by the ooard to carry their ap- 

Erovals, and to whom and through wnom we communicate with the 
oard. I said to him that it seemed to me to be an important matt-er, 
and that I could not proceed as the agent for the ohipping Board 
without consulting that board; and I suggested that ne take this 
matter up and make formal application if he wanted to, to the 
Shipping Board. He went out, and the next morning about 10.30 
o'clock he rung up and said Mr. Shewan would not be around to see 
us, that they nad decided to adopt other methods. That is all I 
know about the matter. 

The Chairman. When did that take place? 

Mr. GiBBS. That took place, I should say, about the 20th of April, 
about a week or ten days after bids were called for; that is, after the 
invitation went out. 

The Chairman. Have you had any talk with Mr. Shewan or his 
representative since that time ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No: I have seen neither of them nor talked to them. 

The Chairman. So that your decimation to furnish him with a copy 
of the specifications and the contract was not final ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I did not decline to do it. I said I could not do it as 
agent without the authority of the Shipping Board, and I referred 
him to the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. Did you ever confer with Mr. Hague or the Ship- 
ping Board with respect to that matter ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Mr. Hague was in California at the time, and my recol- 
lection is that his representative rang me up and said that they had 
rumors that the Messrs. Shewan were aggrieved at this situation and 



SHIPPIKG BOABD OPERATIOKS. 1355 

proposed to adopt strong measures. I am not sure whether he said 
an mjimction proceedmg or not, but am inclined to think he did. 
The Chairman. Who was that? 

Mr. GiBBs. That was Mr. Dunning, Mr. Hague's assistant. I then 
stated that as far as I was concerned I had reierred him to the Ship- 
ping Board when he came to see me, because I did not feel it was a 
matter we had sufficient authority to deal with, either to decline or 
to give him the specifications. I distinctly did not do either. 
Tho Chaikman. And you did not give him the specifications? 
Mr. GiBBs. No; and 1 did not decline to give the specifications to 
him because, as I stated, I had not the authority to ao either thing. 
The Chaikman. And did Mr. Hague ever give you any reason for 
this particular firm not being included in the list of those to whom 
proposals were sent ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I do not recollect that he did. I would not have asked 
him for any reason because I could see ample reason myself without 
asking for it. 

The Chairman. At any of those conferences was the availability of 
the Shewan yard talked of for doing this worft ? 

Mr. GiBBs. My impression is that at one of the conferences, and I 
do not know when it was, mention was made of the Shewans, but I 
"would not be certain about it. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether it was in connection with 
their having an opportunity to bid on this work ? 

^Ir. GiBBs. Yes; it was in that connection, if it was mentioned at all. 
The Chairman. Do you remember whether anything was said at 
. this particular time about their being given an opportunity or not 
being given an opportunity to bid ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, my impression is — though mv recollection is 
hazy on that point — ^but my recollection is that if tfiere was any dis- 
cussion it was passed by with the thought that they were not, by 
reason of their experience, able to handle that class of work. 

The Chairman. Do you know how long they have been in business ? 
Mr. GiBBs. I do not. 

The Chairman. Do you know what experience they have had ? 
Mr. GiBBS. I know what experience they have not had. 
The Chairman. Is that a sufficient guide ? 

Mr. GiBBS. It is as a general rule. Uf I may illustrate what I mean 
by that: I used in general the principles that were laid down by the 
Navy Department in dealing with this work — that is, as to who 
should bid on it. The only concerns, if the matter were left to me 
purely and considering the ship by reason of its draft and size net- 
ting to the yards of the diflferent contractors, the only concerns tnat 
I would consider in a job of this magnitude would be concerns that 
had built capital ships for the Navy. By capital ships I mean a 
battleship or a battle cruiser. The number of yards that have built 
cajpital snips for the Navy is limited to about four — the New York 
^upbuilding Corporation, the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry 
Dock Co., the William Cramp Ship & Enrine Co., and the Bethlehem 
Shipbuilding Corporation, the latter wifli two plants, one at Fore 
River and the other at the Union Iron Works at San Francisco. 
Those are the five yards, owned by the four companies that I have 
mentioned, that the Navy Department have sufficient confidence in 
by reason of their experience and Equipment, and particularly by 



1356 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

reason of the scientific attainments of the men at the head of them, 
to build a battleship, which is ^e most compUcated thing the Nay; 
has to deal with. 

This ship, by reason of its size and complications, falls exactly into 
that class, and, fmilxermore, because these are the only yards that 
have built new vessels having lai^e extent passenger acconunodatioDs. 
That does not mean that t£ey nave built any Slips as large as the 
Leyiaihan, but they have built a considerable number of large oceaa 
going steamers. 

In discussing this thing it was the thought, as Mr. Franklin ex- 
pressed this morning, originally that we womd get two yards together 
in the handling of the work. We would then gain the scientific 
experience and the ship facilities in the way of joiner work and other 
eqiiipment of the big yards, we will say, coupled up with the repair 
facihties and plant at the point of operation — that is, here in New 
York — ^todo tne work here and employ the men in instaUing it. In 
ether words, to take a concrete case: If we had joiner work to be 
done for the Leviathan that joiaer work would be put through the 
Cramp shops in Philadelphia, where they have ample joiner shops 
and have done a lot of this high-class ship work. The mateml 
would then come over and be erected into this vessel by the repair 
yard here, after consultation with and determination by us on the 
suitability of those who were to do the work. For the sake of the 
argument we will say that that would be done by the Cramp Co., 
because their men are f amiUar with that class of work, whereas the 
repair vards here in New York have not the facilities and have not the ^ 
men who are familiar by reason of their scientific attainments for that ' 
sort of difficult work. That was the ideal way, as it seemed, to us to 
deal with it. 

Then when we foimd the ship could not go to two or three yards, 
and there was necessity for a lump-sum bid, we thou^t: Let us 
invite the shipyards in New York who have done reconditioning work 
on large ocean goin^ passenger steamers, and those three yards are 
the Morse, the Fletcner, and the Todd. Then we will call in the four 
shipyards who have the scientific attainments that we want and the 
big ship facilities, and we will bring in three repair yards which know 
what tnat work means in the matter of erection in a vessel and who 
have had a lot of experience and we will turn the plans and specifica- 
tions over to them and invite bids, and in the process of natural selec- 
tion those ones may get together — that is, the New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation with one of the yards here, or the Cramps with one of the 
yards, or the Bethlehem with one of the yards — or we may get a 
straight bid from one of these yards, and then it is for us to determine 
as between a bid made by one of the big shipyards and a repair yard, 
or consider just a straight repair yard, having in mind time, responsi- 
bility, and everything else of the bidders, and then we will go ahead. 

We certainly would not have been justified in any circumstances 
in inviting people in who had not had experience in this work. Just 
imagine my position, gentlemen of the committee, if we had come 
down to an investigation like this, and a yard had had it which had 
never done any laige passenger ship reconstruction, and you had 
said to me: What did you mean by picking out that particular yard I 
Had they ever done any of this class of work on a laree steamer! 
And then I would say no. And then you would ask: Well, has Todd 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 135T 

done any of tliis work ? And I would say yes. And then you would 
ask: Has Fletcher done any of this work? And then I would say 
yes. And then you would ask: Has Morse done any of this work? 
j\nd I would answer, yes he had. Then you would say: You picked 
out the only yard of the loit who had not done large reconditioning^ 
i^ork and put the Leviathan in their hands, although you knew it wa& 
tlie largest and most difficult piece of work of the land that had ever 
come up. And what position would I be in ? I could not possibly 
have justified it. 

That is the reason I say that experience was what was needed. They 
needed to have the best facilities, as good facilities for ordinary 
repairs as are in the port of New York. They have that, and their 
reputation is the highest, but that does not mean that you will choose 
them. You will not choose them because they have not had the expe- 
rience in that line, as you know, and this is a case where experience ia 
the most important element in it. 

The Chairman. You say that you know that the Shewan yard haa 
not done any of this work ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I have never heard that they have reconditioned large 
ocean-going passenger steamers. 

The Chairman. Have you made any investigation or inquiry to 
find out. 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; I have inquired in a general way. 

The Chairman. Of whom ? 

^Ir. GiBBS. Well, I inq[uired principally of the Shipping Board, 
because all of the reconditioning work has been done to date imder 
the Shipping Board, except that there has been some private work^ 
but that nas not been of large character outside of our own steamers, 
because there are not any large passenger steamers outside. 

The Chairman. Have you recently made any inquiry as to the: 
capacitv of the Shewan yard ? 

Mr. CiBBS. I have not. 

The Chairman. What ships of the Shipping Board have been 
reconditioned by the Fletcher yard ? 

Mr. GiBBs. I would not sav that any have, I don't think. We have 
had four big steamers reconditioned by Fletcher. We had the Min- 
nesota, the Kroonland, the Finland., and the St. Louis. The St. Louis^ 
was burned just as she was finished, but the work was very well along^ 
and you must remember also that Fletcher has done a good deal of 
contracting for completed ships on their own account, ships on which 
joiner work predominated, like river steamers and sound steamers. 

The Chairman. Was that reconditioning work similar to what is 
required in the Leviathan, though on a smaller scale ? 

Mr. GiBBS. In a general way. Of course, it was in a smaller way^ 
Those steamers were only of about 12,000 tons, but they were ocean- 
going steamers. 

The CHAIRMAN. What is the tonnage of the Leviathan ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Her tonnage is 54,282 tons. 

The C^iRMAN. What is her net tonnage ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I would not say right offhand, but I can get it for you.. 

The Chairman. Is that her dead-weight tonnage ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No; that is her gross registered tonnage. 



1358 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

The Chairman. Have you been present at any conferences or 
meetings at which matters were discussed and determined relating to 
this reconditioning of the Leviathan, when there were present repre- 
sentatives of these various shipyaras and officials of tne Fleet Cor- 
poration, at which minutes were not kept ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No; the only meeting which I ever remember or 
attended in which the representatives were present and the Shippinjg 
Board representatives were present, was thaf one of the 3d. Now, it 
may have been prior to that time when we were discussing this, 
before the contract was signed, that the Cramps were present, just to 
find out what could be done ^and what they would reconunend in the 
general problem. I think on one occasion Mr. Hague met us as they 
were leaving, or vice versa. I think he was there for about a minute. 

The Chairman. Where was that naeeting ? 

Mr. GiBBS. It was at our office, if it occurred. 

The Chairman. Were you ever present at any meeting w^hen the 
representatives of the shipping concerns were also present, and mat- 
ters were discussed relating to this question, in the Whitehall Club f 

Mr. GiBBS. No; I was not. I never heard of any such meeting. 

The Chairman. All these discussions and conferences, up to and 
including December 3, were before your company actually had the 
contractl 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

The Chairman. To act as agent for the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

The Chairman. And had the vessel been turned over to you before 
that? 

Mr. GiBBS. Oh, no. No; the vessel was not turned over to us 
until after the contract was signed. 

The Chairman. Had you begun work on procuring specifications 
before the contract was signed ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, my office was investigating the general situation, 
and they had a sort of tentative start in considering it. I mean, that 
we were making some preliminary estimates of stability and one thing 
and another; but it was not really that we got into it, you might say. 

The Chairman. Did you ever make any inquiry as to what partic- 
ular character of work the Shewan yard aid perform for the Shipping 
Board ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I did: and I understood that they were doing ordinary 
running repairs. That is what their reputation is here in tne port, 1 
know; if we have ordinary running repairs, we consider the Messrs. 
Shewan. For instance, if pipes are carried away, or a stem is bent, 
or the dry-docking of a smaller vessel is required, or something like 
that. 

The Chairman. Or joiner work ? 

Mr. GiBBS. For the smaller ships; yes. 

The Chairman. At any of those conferences at which you were 
present, was there anytmng said at any time to the effect that this 
job must be restricted to a certain few favored yards, and that other 
yards must not be permitted to have an opportunity to bid ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No, sir^ there was never any such statement made. 

The Chairman. And outside of this one occasion, about which you 
have told us your recollection, you never hoard the Shewan yard dis- 
cussed or the reasons given for not including them, or of their attempts 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1359 

to be permitted to submit a bid, or of other matters of that nature 
discussed. 

Mr. GiBBS. No. 

The Chairman. Do you know anything about any contract or 
arrangement having been entered into witn a firm of acrhitects for 
preparing plans ana specifications for this work ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; I did. 

The Chairman. Was that before or after you were appointed 
agent? 

Mr. GiBBS. Afterwards by about three or four weeks. 

The Chairman. Is there a firm employed ? 

Mr. GiBBs. There is. 

The Chairman. By whom? 

Mr. GiBBS. By us as agent of the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. What firm? 

Mr. GiBBS. The firm of Walker & Gillette. • 

The Chairman. What are they to do ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Well, you will notice in the contract with the Shipping 
Board it provides that with their consent the agent will employ 
technical experts. In the discussions about that diause in the con- 
tract as to tne experts it was considered they were in the nature of 
interior decorators. In other words, tlus ship, because of its size 
and by reason of its ceiling heights and various things, presents a 
very oifficult piece of worK from a decorative point of view. In 
other words, to iusure that the interior appearance of the ship will 
equal any oi the best hotels and the very oest work of that kind, it 
was always considered necessary, and that provision in the contract 
was put in to take care of the employment of men particularly quali- 
fied Dy reason of their architectural and artistic attainments to 
consult with us and aid us in that particular work. As you must 
know, in these specifications that we have it is provided that the fur- 
niture, draperies, and, in fact, all the decorations of the ship shall be 
made on a lump-sum basis. That necessitates a very searching 
investigation of these various things, the various fabrics, and color 
schemes and decorative features before the contract is made. And 
it was to help us and to consult with our technical people that these 
men were brought in who have particular experience along this line. 

The Chairman. Were any experienced hotel decorating contractors 
considered ? 

Mr. Gibes. No; they were not. And for this reason 

The Chairman (interposing). Is this similar work to that? 

Mr. GiBBs. It is; and in another way it is not. You see the rooms 
in this vessel — in fact, in any vessel — are relatively small. I mean 
the staterooms. One of the beauties of this ship when it came out 
was the artistic merit of the stateroom decorations. In the big ships, 
starting in with the Olympic, and much more so in the Aquatanicby 
which was a more recent snip, and more so in the Irnperator, which is 
a ship very much like this one, and that was owned by the Hamburg- 
American Line, the architects on the other side went in for fine effects 
in individual staterooms, so that when you went into your stateroom 
it had a fresh appearance, and the decorative feature of the state- 
rooms was well taken care of. In other words, to ffive you an idea 
how far they go in that direction, on the Aquatania they took various 
staterooms and named them after the artists of the Elizabethan 



ll 



1360 SHIPPIKQ BOARD 0PBBATI0K8. 

period in England; Gainsborough, for example, and things like that, 
where the rooms are fitted up luter that period, and pictures, and so 
forth, illustrative of that period are put in the rooms. These are 
smaller rooms and they present the problems faced in a private 
house, not in a hotel, because the rooms in a private house are mudi 
smaller. 

In doing decorating in such a room, as I think you may have 
noticed in the sample stateroom on yesterday, it is necessary to put 
a miniature molding in. In a hotel you have rooms of a certain size, 
and you can do the work according to a certain model or style. But 
mostly in these rooms they have to use miniature molds. This firm 
had had experience in decorating yachts, and had had experience in 
the biggest and most important private houses in the city and 
suburbs. These private houses, as you know, have big rooms in 
them. They have big hallways, and so forth, and theirs was the 
nearest knowledge that we could get to the problems presented in 
that ship. That is why we picked out these architects. We were 
considermg the architects who built the Pennsylvania Hotel, and 
several other firms, but selected this firm because I knew their work, 
and because, after considering it and consulting people we had con- 
fidence in, we came to the conclusion that this was very much a 
problem of small rooms, more so than of big rooms. There are one 
or two big rooms, but, of course, the large majority of them are small. 

The Chairman. I notice in the specifications a clause requiring that 
the wood to be used shall be such as, being suitable in all other 
re&pects, shall save weight. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

The Chairman. Isn't there a considerable difference in the case of 
wood, so that the contractor would have difficulty in knowing what 
' to bid upon until he knew the particular kind of wood which was to 
be used Tor the ioiner work or staterooms or other work? 

Mr. GiBBS. You will notice that in the specifications it calls for a 
particular kind of wood to be largely used. Now, that is the method 
of building joiner work in a ship that is in use over there at the 
present. In other words, we wanted to use just about the same type 
of woodwork as is in there now. That left us very little discretion 
because that is a type of partitions which are made up of filler and 
wood about throe-quarters of an inch thick and a veneer on either 
side of that wood. It is a novel construction, but it makes a very 
light partition, a strong partition and a durable one. That is the 
kmd in use on the ship, where you saw it on yesterday. Now, what 
wo had we had in mind was that tho filler that they should put into 
that wood, that is, between the two layers of veneer, should oe of as 
light a quality as you could get to stand Tip. Now, it so happens that 
they have been able to use a wood that I think is the red gum, that 
that is the technical term that is applied to it, and that is quite a light 
wood, and at the same time a very inexpensive wood; and that is a 
trade term that was well known to them all. In the case of the other 
wood in the ship it simply meant the requirement of using white pine 
or its equivalent because that is the lightest known thing we use. It 
is quite customary. 

The Chairman. What is litosilo ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Litosilo, it is called. That is a deck covering, that is a 
mixture of cement and sawdust, or cork, or various other mings, and 



SHIPPIlSrG BOABD OPERATIOTrS. . ISBt 

it is laid on the deck. You noticed on the deck, it seemed to be 
cement, or something eauivalent to that, and that is that material. 

The Chairman. By whom is that made? 

Mr. GiBBS. I think in this country by the Marine Decking & Supply 
Co. It is an article that is in all maritime countries; they have 
branches all over. 

The Chairman. Do you know who were their agents ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, I would not say. It is the Marine Decking &. 
Supply Co., I think they are the agents. 

The CHAIRMAN. Is that a heavj'- material ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is a pretty heavy material. Of course, with the 
sawdust filler it is much lighter than ordinary cement, but it is essen- 
tiallv a heavy material. 

The Chairman. Has any substitute been provided for that in the. 
specification ? 

Mr. GiBBs. It is not, because we had under consideration the 
taking up of all of that litosilo all over tue ship, and the substitution 
of sometning that was lighter, but much as we would have liked to 
save that weight, it would have been a tremendous cost, as you can 
imagine, having been over at the ship, to rip that stuff out and put 
in another substance. I discussed it fully^ with our people, and with 
other people, and it seemed to me an unwise thing. It u:ould have 
meant a tremendous cost, and while you would have saved on the 
cost, I did not feel the expense involved would have been justified. 

The Chairman. Who is Mr. Rossell ? 

Mr. GiBBS. He is a representative of the Bethlehem Ship Co. who- 
had in charge the joiner work specifications. 

The Chairman. And this litosilo thing that covers it? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; that comes under the joiner work on the floor. 
Only one place on the vessel where that was so damaged that it 
could not be repaired. In other words, in certain places in the ship* 
there would be a hole three or four feet in diameter. Of course, you 
would not rip up the whole room to repair that hole. You would 
simply fill that hole in, where it is in existence on the ship 

^ ow, in the main dining saloon, the litosilo is in very bad condition, 
and will have to come up, but the arrangement of electrical wirmg in 
the dining room provides for outlets under each of the dining tables. 
An arrangement for imitation candles with electric lights in them on 
the table hke you have seen in some of the hotels, also provides for 
electric wiring pans on the serving table, so it meant that there was 
to be a multiplicity of outlets on the floor of the dining room to 
provide for it. 

The only way those could be laid was on the surface of the steel 
decks. The conduits to lay these wires — ^we had to provide covering 
enough so that the conduits would be filled up, ana in that case we 
were going to use litisiolo, because we have got to get a definite 
thickness to provide this space for the conduits. 

The Chairman. Do you know who the officers of the Litosilo Com- 
panv are ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No, I do not. 

The Chairman. Do you know who the oflftcers of the company are^ 
that make- mastic 9 

Mr. GiBBS. No, I do not know. Mastic is a material, by the wav, 
that is essentially a material that you would put on thin. The only 



1862 . SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIOKS. 

place we could use the mastic would have been in the dining saloon, 
and there it happened we had a situation facing us that demanded a 
fixed material. 

The Chairman. Who makes that ? 

Mr. Gibes. The mastic — I do not know. It is a trade t^nn that is 
used. I do not know who it is. 

The Chairman. Now then, have you any opinion as to whether 
this work can be better performed at the Navy Yard than by letting 
it out to private contractors ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, I have the feeling, and that was the thing that 
prompted us to invite the Brooklyn Navy Yard and the Boston yard 
to bid, that other things being equal, it would be very advisable 
indeed to have it done at the navy yard, with one exception, and 
that is, I do not know how far the Navy will go in meeting us on the 
inspection work 

Now, you can draw the best possible set of plans and specifications, 
and you can get a very poor job as a result of it, simply because the 
supervision and the inspection is at fault. You see, to insure good 
work on a thing as large as this, and where you are up against such a 
very high standard in other vessels of this tjrpe, and in the existing 
type of work in this ship, you have got to have a very rigid inspec- 
tion. For instance, the one great fault in mo^ of these ships is the 
finish of the paint work. Now, it is very difficult thii^, and you 
have got to have your men right on the job to watch these painters to 
see that they rub down the work well enough, and apply it properly 
or you do not get a proper finish; or it looks sloppy. It is things like 
that that is essential to be dealt with to insure a good piece of work. 
And if the Navy — and I have every confidence in them — I know the 
officers that have come to see me from the Boston yard, particularly, 
because they are to do the estimating and seem to be very anxious to 
get the work, and have assured us they would do everything possible 
to meet us on it. I know, from speaking to Mr. Hague, and Com- 
mander Woodward, by the experience in the New York yard, that 
they are very anxious to have the work, and to do it good. I am 
hopeful that is the case, but, if it is not the case you are not going to 
get a good piece of work. 

There is no earthly use to get the same man to inspect the same 
work that he is doing. In all repairs we are doing on this vessel, we 
have a special inspection that has nothing to do with the fellows that 
axe making the repairs. They are perfectly independent. Tliey 
report to me and have nothing to do with the fellows who are doing 
.the work. If you do not do that, you are bound to have difficulty. 

The Chaibman. Do you know any reason why your company, 
with its organization and staff, and experienced men, have under- 
taken to take the contract for this work itself? 

Mr. GiBBs. Oh, I do. We are not shipbuilders. 

The Chairman. You are not shipbuilaers ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No. 

The Chairman. Well, you are acting as agent now for the Ship- 
ping Board ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

The Chairman. Would you have been in any different position if 
you had taken a contract after these specifications had been drawn 
up with the liberty to ask for bids from these various concerns, and 



SHIPPING BOABD OPBRATIOliirS. 1863 

let subcontractors do that, your work to be inspected by Mr. Hague 
and his force ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, that is not the case. I do not know whether I 
get the point of what you ask. 

The Chairman. You would be in a different position ? 
Mr. GiBBS. Well, we would not be. We are not in a position of 
contracting for this work^ to perform it, and as I understand Mr. 
Franklin's point of view, in which I certainly concur, we would not 
put ourselves in that position, because that is not our business. This 
IS a difficidt situation. We have no plant or nothing. We would be 
dependent on somebody we could not control. 

The Chairman. You have enough to act as agent for the Shipping 
Board? 

Mr. GiBBS. There is no question about it. 

The Chairman. That is, you have got experience; you have an 
organization. 

Mr. GiBBs. Exactlv. 

The Chairman. Now, this ship is to be tiu'ned over to you as 
operators ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; that is it, when completed. 

The Chairman. So, aside from the question of title, you are acting 
just as if this work was to be for you ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Oh, quite. Now I understand what you mean. Now, 
certainly, that is exactly our position. We have always looked at 
this thing as if the ship belonged to us. We are just as anxious to 
see it in a proper manner as if the ship did belong to us. 

The Chairman. Now, assuming that the ship did belong to you, 
that the Shipping Board had accepted your bid on January 20, and 
made necessary payments, and so forth, and took over the ship, 
would you have proceeded in this same way to have advertised 
for bids ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I think we would, because we had such a good start 
on the specification and plans by that time, and it became conclu- 
sively evident that we could complete that in the maimer that would 
allow a lump sum bid, that I think we should have tried it out. 

The Chairman. At this conference the larger shipbuilders were 
not particularly anxious to do this work, were they? 

Mr. GiBBS. No, they were not. The Newport News, I think, was 
the most anxious one, and they said if they could get the ship to 
their yard, thev would like to make a bid, and they thought they 
could make a lump sum bid, from my recollection; but there was 
very grave question that they could get it to their yard. They have 
a long channel to go through, and they might get a tide and it would 
damage the ship. 

The Chairman. Nobody was anxious; nobody seemed to be par- 
ticularly anxious. 

Mr. GiBBS. I think Mr. Todd and Mr. Morse were the most anxious. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Hadley ? 

Mr. Hadlby. No; I think not. 

The Chairman. Mr. Steele? 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Gibbs, you stated in answer to a question of the 
chairman, ttiat in drawing this contract you had in mind the prin- 
ciples of the Navy Department in drawing a similar contract. 

Mr. G1BB8. ITiat is it. 



1364 8HIPPIK0 BOABD OPBBATIONB. 

Mr. Steele. Will you elaborate that a little further and give us 
what those principles are ? 

Mr. GiBBS. The Nary principle, as I understand it, especially 
having to do with capital ships, which I considered this ship anali^iis 
to, is to send plans and specifications only to those yards, that by 
reason of their equipment, experience, and the experience of the 
Navy Department, we think that fall in a class to handle this work. 

Now, the Navy specifications are confidential. That, I think, 
Commander Crisp said yesterday and before we undertook the 
specifications, I wrote to the Navy Department, to Admiral Taylor, 
who is the Chief of the Bureau of Construction and Repair ana 
asked him if he would have any objection to allowing us to use 
certain sections of the Navy specifications that are applicable to the 
work that we had in mind. 

Now, the first sections, pa^licularly, are the certain sections of 
this business part of the specification having to do with conditions 
and so forth, and he wrote back and said you could use them, but 
you must make every effort to keep the specifications confidential, 
because our specifications are confidential. It seemed to me that 
automatically precluded us from advertising the specifications and 
bids and sending those things out to anybody who had the desire 
to look them over and ask for them. I tried to confine that to those 
people who, by reason of the scientific attainment of their forces, 
was such as I felt confident to deal with this ship, because I can not 
overrate to you the importance of a proper scientific consideration 
of this ship. 

It is one of those things, if you have had a long experience — a 
better experience with vessels of the same or similar size, you feel 
like stickmg your head in the sand and imagine everything will go 
all right, and then the first time the ship goes out, when you have 
spent ten millions of dollars, or whatever it is, you find it takes a 
severe list at sea and there is a dancer of the smp capsizing. You 
have trouble with your boilers. All these things go wrong. You 
then lay it to anythmg, which is the fortimes of war. 

Now, engineering design has reached its stage, particularly in big 
ships where there is very little left to chance if there were prepara- 
tion for the work. Now, you have got what I mean. 

This vessel has an elaborate system of watertight bulkheads. Now, 
on the plans of the ship those bulkheads are shown as watertight. 
We do not know that tney are watertight, because we have not the 
plans of them. We have got to send our man aboard the ship and 
survey every one of these watertight bulkheads. Lay them out on 
paper and make sure that the strength of the bulkhead is such that 
if a hole is stove into the ship, the compartments bounded by that 
bulkhead flooded, the water reaches the highest point on the bulk- 
head to come together, and that bulkhead is sumciently stiff so it 
would not carry awav and sink the ship. We have had to go over 
every one of tne bulkheads, and we found some that will require 
some additional stiffening that will bring them up to the required 
strength. 

That is a provision which will be more definite, that is, Jbo stick 
your head in the sand and say they are big and strong. They look 
all right, and I guess they are all right. 



SHDPWKG BOARD OPERATIONS. 1365 

The next thing is the question of stability. In the same way we 
assume this is all right. It may be, but may not be. Before we 
do a thing with a ship we must determine that the result is the 
same. You know about ships ; the more experience you have had 
the more things you know are necessary to be determined before 
you start running a ship. 

Mr. Steele. Well, in inviting bids upon plans and specifications, 
is it the practice of the Navy Department to confine those invita- 
tions to recognized shipbuilders ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

Mr. Steele. That is their practice ? 

Mr. GiBBs. It is. 

Mr. Steele. In this particular instance, did you follow out the 
practice of the Navy Department 1 

Mr. GiBBs. I did. Of course, I had this difficulty with it, that I 
liad to carry it on a bid because I had to make a determination 
ourselves which people were competent to handle this particular 
class of work. Tnat had to include the three or four repair yards. 
If there had been any with the requisite experience up here, and 
adopt just that generiu policy that tney adopted. 

Mr. Steele. The architect that you have mentioned, Walker & 
Gillette, what was the character of their specialty ? 

Mr. GiBBs. They are designers of private houses and the interiors 
of yachts. 

Mr. Steele. Did their employment meet with the approval of the 
Shipping Board ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Oh, yes ; we had to get their approval, and that ap- 
proval was given. 

The Chairman. Mr. KeUey? 

Mr. Kelley. I am rather interested in this paragraph in the 
specification, on page 6, which you stated, I think, as rather unusual. 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. An unusual paragraph ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. It provides that a contractor shall produce a work- 
able slufi in all its parts and appurtenances. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is, the next sentence is the part that is unusual. 

Mr. Kelley. And such changes, are required by the agent to make 
the ship and all its parts workable, to be performed without extra 
cost. 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. This is rather hard to understand how you could 
get anybody to accept that proposition. 

Mr. GiBBs. That is why 1 am able to sav if you had found such 
an individual the chances are you wiU merely avoid extras. 

Mr. Kelley. But you will arive away all contractors. 

Mr. GiBBS. I do not know whether we will or not. 

Mr. Kelley. Suppose you were a contractor and I said to you 
that I want you to build, this ship so that it will work, and if my 
plans and specifications upon whicn you are bidding wo\ild not pro- 
duce that residt, and I change them, and you will do the extra work 
for nothing, would you take that kind of a contract ? 

Mr. GiBBs. That would altogether depend on what my regard was 
for the man who said it to me. 



1366 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Kelley. In other words, if the contractor and the owner were 
good friends, the thing might go ? 

Mr. GiBBs. No; friendship would not have anything to do with it. 

Mr. Kelley. Well, what would be the consideration that would 
permit you to take that contract under these conditions 1 

Mr. GiBBS. .Just let me cite a case: If we were building a ship at 
the New York Shipbuilding Corporation — ^for the sake of argument — 
a large vessel, I would maKe that provision in the contract, and the 
New York Shipbuilding Corporation would accept it, because the 
plans and specifications would be the joint effort of the New York 
Shipbuilding Corporation and ourselves. Now, I know the men at 
the New York Shipbuilding Corporation well, not personally, but in 
a business direction. They have confidence in me. If a "question 
of providing a workable ship, which they have undertaken to do, 
comes up, they would consult wth me. We would consider the 
matter together. If there was something there that would not 
make a workable ship, the New York Shipbuilding Corporation 
would be the first people to suggest the necessary changes, and we 
would agree. That is true practically of any of these big yards 
that undertake to build you a large vessel complete. For that reason 
the changes provided the plans and specifications are well draivn — 
the changes, that are necessary to make a workable ship, are of a 
minor character, and those plans and specifications are always the 
joint effort of the two people. 

If they are not the joint effort of the two people, they are the single 
effort of the owner, and they are adopted oy the buUder. He goes 
through them and approves them, and before he signs a contract he 
points out the weak things, in his opinion, that are necessary to make 
them workable. 

Mr. Kelley. But you do not confine this to minor changes. You 
say: Any change that is necessary to make the plans worKable and 
make the ship a success must be made by the contractor without 
the expense to the* owner. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. Now, if I were a contractor, why, it does not seem as 
though I would be induced to sign a contract like that. I am putting 
mysdf absolutely in the hands of the owner. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. And all my bondsmen and all my security of every 
kind ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. All my deposit in your hands, completely ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. You could not get Mr. Todd to sign a contract like 
that? 

Mr. GiBBs. I do not know. He is going to tell me on the 15th. 

Mr. Kelley. If he knew you were signing a contract like that do 
you think he would do it ? 

Mr. GiBBs. I do not know whether Mr. Todd will do it or not. I 
told you exactly how I feel on this situation. I am not here to look 
after the contractor. He is 21 years old and supposed to do it him- 
self. If he would not make a contract with me, I have taken the 
pains to ask two navy yards to submit an estimate. The Boston 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1367 

yard is going to submit an estimate. I think that really means that 
the work can be done in either of the yards. 

Mr. Kelley. There has been quite a bit of talk that you are not 
going to get any bids under this specification. Is this the reason that 
you think you are not going to get bids, because this kind of a provi- 
sion is in here? 

Mr. GiBBs. No. I would not recommend — I will put it this way: 
If 'we could not get a lump sum bid — that is that provision in it, I do 
not want to bother with private contractors for a minute, because 
exactly the situation will arise which these fellows are making 
hundreds of thousands of dollars out of extras. 

Mr. Kelley. Let me ask you the reverse question. Now, suppose 
you were in Mr. Todd's place, or he in your place, or in the Govern- 
ment's position, would you sign a contract agreeing to make the plans 
and specifications workable, and involve any change that mignt be 
made without any extra expense? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, I would, provided I was in your place. 
Mr. Kjjlley. What do you mean by that ? 

Mr. GiBBs. In other words, if you knew your business — if you were 
in my shoes, and you knew exactly what we know; what we want — 
we are not going to ask these fellows for anvthing unreasonable, but 
going to get from them a workable ship, and if you were that kind of 
a man I would contract with you. 

Mr. Kelley. I supposed business men made a definite engagement, 
and never left it witnm the election of one side or the other. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is absolutely true, and this is not an election of 
one side or the other at all. We asked Todd to give us a workable 
ship. Now, will he contract for a workable ship ? If he does, there 
is no change necessary. 

Mr. Kelley. That depends upon whether your plans are all right 
or not. 

Mr. GiBBS. Oh, no. Todd was in on these plans. 
Mr. Kelley. Well, he is not responsible for the plans in the con- 
tract. Suppose you did not put these tanks in the right place under 
your specracations, and the ship lists one way or the other, and he has 
to tear those out and put them m some other place at his own expense, 
is that right? 

Mr. GiBBS. I do not think it is. 
Mr. Kelley. Why not ? 
Mr. GiBBs. Because. 

Mr. Kelley. Any changes that are made ? 

Mr. GiBBs. I quite agree, but Mr. Todd has the opportunity to 
determine whether these tanks are in the right place. Now, when 
he agrees to ^o ahead on that basis he is in with us just as much as 
we are ourselves. In other words, Mr. Todd has his opportunity, 
and has had it for three and a half or four months to determine 
whether these tanks are in the right place, and after even when he 
starts in, he sees these things are not right — I do not want to do it 
that way, there would not be any contract. We would not go 
ahead. If, on the other hand, he starts, he is as much a party as we 
are. We have asked for a workable ship. If he does not like our 
dee^n, let him come forward and say so. 

i&r Kelley. Well, Mr. Todd would not change the specifications 
given him. Suppose, as you go along and you find out there is some- 



1368 SHIPPIKQ BOARD OPERATIONS. 

thing there, that he discovers perhaps the same as you might discover 
later on that was not workable after he signed the contract, and 
after he had entered upon the work, then you change it involving an 
entirely different scheme, perhaps at a very much additional cost, 
and you are requiring him to do that work for nothing under this 
contract. 

Mr. GiBBs. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. Is there anv man so near an insane asylum that he 
would sign a contract like that 1 

Mr. GiBBS. I am sure I do not know how Mr. Todd is. 

Mr. Kelley. The contractor will not be allowed to take advanti^ 
of any error or omission in the specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. Well now, on a repair job there may be any quantity 
of things which you could set up that were omissions. 

Mr. uiBBs. Tnat is right. 

Mr. Kelley. And say vou had forgotten to put it in, you have 
got to do it at the original cost. 

Mr. GiBBs. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. You do not mean to tell me, Mr. Gibbs, as a business 
man and engineer, there is anybody on earth would allow you to say 
whether or not a thing was an omission or not if it was not in the 
specifications? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is the provision that is in your Navy specification. 

Mr. Kelley. The Navy specification for a new ship ? 

Mr. GiBBs. For anything that is of sufficient importance. 

Mr. Kelley. That would not be true like repairs on a ship. 

Mr. GiBBs. I certainly think it would. 

Mr. Kelley. Would you send a battleship into the Navy Yard to 
have the bottoms scraped or some repair made, would the Govern- 
ment come on and require under that contract the engines to be all 
overhauled, and the boilers repaired ? 

Mr. Gibbs. No, they do not make a contract like that. 

Mr. Kelley. On the ground they forgot to put that in, and it 
was omission ? 

Mr. Gibbs. No, that is not this case. 

Mr. Kelley. Well, I am not surprised, Mr. Gibbs, that you do 
not expect to get any bids for this thing. 

Mr. Gibbs. 1 have not said we do not expect to get any bids. I 
say this, you could not get me to stand between the Government of 
the United States and a private contractor on work involving the 
amount of money that this work involves, unless that provision is 
in the specification. 

Mr. Kelley. I agree with you entirely that if the relation between 
the agent in this case and the contractor is such that they thoroughly 
understand each other, then he might possibly sign that contract, 
but working in the ordinary relation of contractor and owner, I do 
not believe there is a business man in the United States who will 
undertake to do that, do vou 1 

Mr. Gibbs. That may be so. Well, let me give you my point ot 
view on that. 

Mr. Kelley. I may be entirely wrong. I am a layman on this 
shipbuilding business. 



SHIPPING BOAKD OPERATIONS. 1369 

Mr. GiBBs. I have heard it said that nobody would sign one of the 
Navy contracts for a capital stock if he was a sane man. Now, these 
provisions are no more onerous than the Navy imposes in the case of a 
oapital ship, but look at my position. Supposing we have got here 
'^ork of tne ma^tude that is required in the capital ship for the 
Navy ? Now, wnat position would I be in if I accept any less safe- 
guard in the specification than the Navy requires ? Iwould be before 
& court. You would come to me and say, you had reference to the 
Navv specification, why didn^t you put this provision in ? And you 
i^ould be right. In other words, if they make it impossible. 

Mr. Kelley. We have another provision: ^'If in the opinion'' 

Mr. GiBBS (interrupting). Where is this? 

Mr. Kelley. At page 51. [Reading:] 

If in the opinion of the agent it becomes necessary to place in iMsition further 
"^^tertight or fire screen bulluieads, and modified arrangement of plans, such modi- 
fications will not be deemed a departure from the priginal plans or specification for 
the installation of the joiner work, if the same, on the steamer, had not oeen started. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. So it does not make any difference if you have to put 
in twice as many bulkheads as you contemplated, and they would not 
get any pay for it. 

Mr. GiBBS. No; this is what it means: If we find it necessary to put 
extra bulkheads in the steamer, and we do that, and we put them in, 
that is our option to put them in. This is, we will say, an intersecting 
place in which, on the plans are shown staterooms — that would mean 
the stateroom arrangement plan would have to be modified in the 
space provided. If the staterooms had not been started where that 
bulkhead is going to do, the plan wiU be modified, and the arrange- 
ment of the staterooms will oe modified, and put in in accordance 
with the bulkhead. 

Mr. Kelley. I understand that, if the staterooms have been 
started this would not apply, but if you have not started, you cut 
out as many as you see fit, and cause him to install the additional 
without any extra cost. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

Mr. Kelley. How could a contractor contract to do that ? 

Mr. GiBBS. He does not undertake to do that. 

Mr. Kelley. He might, if you demanded it. 

Mr. GiBBs. No. 

Mr. Kelley. Tell me why ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Because that is not necessary to make a workable ship. 

Mr. Kelley. Well, you are the judge as to whether it is workable 
<Mr not. 

Mr. GiBBS. The judges has always to be reasonable. In other 
words, Todd has a perfect right to come and show us how this thing 
is not necessary to make a workable ship. Now, of course, we can 
adopt an attitude — of course, we can oe crooked on this thing, 
and say we have got to have 100 bulkheads on this ship, just like 
the Navy Department can adopt a rule for a capital ship that will 
ruin any builder on earth. The fact of the matter is, the N avy does 
not adopt that attitude, and the fact of the matter is we would not 
adopt that attitude. Only by putting those provisions in are you 
going to protect the situation. The Navy does that, and the con- 

177068— 20--PT 4 9 



1870 SHIPPING BOABD OFEBATIONS. 

tractor goes in with the Nayy on that proposition, depending upon 
their fair sense of fair play. 

Now, any contractor that takes this thinp up with" us on the lump 
sum bid is going to depend on our sense of fair play. Now, if we are 
crooked, we can ball this thing up completely, just exactly the way 
the contractor can. When I ssj we are crooked, I do not mean he 
will pay us money, but we will give the opinion that is not fair. In 
other words, we will adopt a course that we will get even with that 
contractor and we will show him what we are going to do. In 
other words, it is faith between the parties as it is between the Navy 
and the contractor. 

Mr. Kelley. But the contractor actually puts himself in a position 
when he signs this contract of doing all these things without extra 
cost. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is absolutely the position, and in the event of the 
smoking room case that I pointed out to you, where there is a clear 
case of a workable ship without it, and tnen if we want extra work 
we can get bids for that particular thing, and the contractor, who 
is the general contractor, may or not be the low bidder, and may 
not do the work, but there is no way he can hold you up. 

Mr. Kelley. You called in in the beginning the experts from 
the four great yards where they had been buildmg battleships ? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

Mr. Kelley. Why didn't you call in experts from the navy yard 
over here on that same survey? 

Mr. GiBBS. The navy yard was perfectly familiar with the ship. 
You heard Commander Crisp, who had been on the ship fifty-odd 
times. 

Mr. Kelley. I mean now, with a view to making plans. 

Mr. GiBBS. They had just made a survey of the snip when they 
turned her over. 

Mr. Kelley. Then you would have had the benefit of the naval 
survey and advice in making these plans? 

Mr. GiBBS. No. 

Mr. Kelley. That is what I am getting at. You had called in 
these special men from the various private yards. 

Mr. GiBBS. That is right. 

Mr. Kelley. In order to assist you in getting a proper plan? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. And the thought struck me as you were making that 
statement that you might have had some very valuable information 
from the navy yard men of the same character, and I wondered why 
you did not call them in. 

Mr. GiBBS. I think that was twofold at that time. There had 
not been any mention made of the possibility of the Navy doing this 
work for the Shipping Board, you see, and it certainly was not in 
my mind that the Navy Department would want to cooperate with 
a private agency in the preparation of plans and specifications of a 
ship that tney did not own, and at that time that nobody thought 
would go to the navy yard for it. 

Mr. Kelley. Of course, the ship belonged to the Government. 

Mr. GiBBS. Oh, of course. 

Mr. Kelley. And the Navy had used the ship all through the war? 



BBJPFVSfQ BOARD OPERATIONS. 1371 

Mr. GiBBS. But they had turned it over to the Shipping Board, 
and the^ were not any longer concerned with the vessel. 
Mr. Kelley. It seems to me the Navy would have been the first 

Slace where you would have gone to get all the information you 
esired. 

Mr. GiBBS. We did do that. We went to the Navy and got such 
plans and specifications as we could, and we consulted with them 
m various ways. 

Mr. Ejsllet. That is what I asked you, and I understood the 
Navy did not help you get these up at all. 

Mr. GiBBS. No; I thought you meant that we invited the Navy 
men to sit in these conferences. 
Mr. Kktj.ky. I meant did you avail vourself of this information 1 
Mr. GiBBs. Yes, what plans they nad, and what information 
they had in a general way, but we did not feel we were in a posi- 
tion to go to them and ask them to loan us men for months on end 
to go into the situation. 

Mr. Kelley. I think you felt more inclined to go to them inas- 
much as the Government owned the ship, instead oi going to private 
concerns and asking them to loan you men for months at a time. 

Mr. GiBBs. No, because at that time we did not know whether the 
Navy would bid, or wanted to do the job. We went to the other 
men and we said this work has got to be done. Maybe you will get 
it, and maybe you will not, but vou have got to come in and help. 
Mr. Kelley. Whose dock is that ship at now ? 
Mr. GiBBs. I imderstand the Army controls the pier. 
Mr. Kelley. What is the usual charge for dockage ? 
Mr. GiBBS. I do not know. 

Mr. Kelley. That would make some difference, I suppose, in the 
bids, the amount of dockage? 

Mr. GiBBS. No, because m the specifications we provided that the 
pier at which the vessel would be lined, would be furnished by the 
Government. That is, if the work is done where it is now. 

Mr. Kelley. That is, it would be an extra charge to the Govern- 
ment? 

Mr. GiBBS. The Government has got to consider they have a pier 
occupied by the Leviathan while this work is being done. 
Mr. Kelley. So there is not any money involved in this % 
Mr. GiBBS. No, it is aU Government controlled property. 
The Chairman. Mr. Steele ? 

Mr. Steele. Am I correct in nay imderstanding, then, that these 
onerous provisions to which Gov. Kelley has directed your attention, 
were taken from the Navy specifications ? 

Mr. GiBBs. The latter one was. The provision for the workable 
ship complete in all its parts was put in, and I do not know whether 
that is in the Navy specification, but the contractor can not take 
advantage of the omissions or mistakes in the specification. That is 
a Navy provision. 

Mr. Steele. I understood you to say also that the Navy had been 
invited — one of the yards haa been invited to make bids ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Both yards, the New York yard and the Boston Navy 
Yard. 

Mr. Steele. That is this same bidding that these private con- 
tractors were asked to bid ? 



1 



1372 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. You see, in other words, we took this posi- 
tion. This lumpsum contract — these contractors said they would 
be prepared to bid on a Iximp sum at that December 3 meeting, 
If you consult the minutes, I think it appears there — they were ask^ 
directly whether they would be prepared to bid a lump sum with no 
extras to provide a completely workable ship, with no extras, and 
they replied — or two of them did, that they would be prepared to 
do that. 

Now, at that time everybody realized the importance of the extras 
of the situation, because everybody recognized there miriit be a tre- 
mendous increase in the price of the job and the profit, and everything 
else if extra could be put in, and so the people wno suggested alump- 
sum bid for all of it could be made, said at the time it could be done 
without any extras, but when we came to ask for the bid, if for any 
reason these people do not bid, assuming they lose their nerves, and 
say we can not oid for this because of this provision, and the only 
provision in there that would prevent them is the provision for a 
workable ship, then we have the two navy yards, as we hoped, I 
understand the New York Navy Yard is not making an estimate, but 
we hoped we would have it in New York Harbor, and we would have 
the Boston yard as well, and we thought in that way we would know 
about where we were getting at. 

Mr. Steele. In contracting for machinery, is it not a usual pro- 
vision in the contract that the machinery must be satisfactory to the 
purchaser ? 

Mr. GiBBs. I think it is in all cases. 

Mr. Steele. And that usual interpretation of that is that does not 
mean the exercise of unreasonable judgment, but it must be reason- 
able in connection with the machinerv that is actually built? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is the attitude, the reasonableness of the law. 

Mr. Steele. WeD, the law interpreted in that way ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Connally? 

Mr. Connally. In the preparation of these plans and specifications, 
was there any change made in the ballast tanks ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes; there were. 

Mr. Connally. That is, the amoimt of ballast — the Leviaihan has 
a water ballast ? 

Mr. GiBBS. It has both water and both permanent ballast — pig 
iron in the forward end. 

Mr. Connally. You mean it is part of the vessel ? 

Mr. GiBBs. It is put in the holds forward, and in one of the tanks 
forward. 

Mr. Connally. Did you make any change in these ballast tanks ) 

Mr. GiBBs. We will when the ship is completed. We have arranged 
to have oil fuel carried in place of what was formerly ballast ta^ra, 
and we provided for the fresh water to be carried in certain tanks 
that were formerly ballast tanks. There has been a rearrangement 
of the tanks as made necessary by this provision. 

Mr. Connally. The oil would be a good deal lighter than the salt 
water ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No; the oil takes about 37 cubic feet to a ton, and the 
salt water takes about 35, so that there is not a great deal of difference 
this way. We are providing for a very hoavv low srrade kind of oil 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1373 

to be used, so the price of the oil will be down low. We can run the 
ship on a very low grade of oil. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. What technical training did you have before you 
went into this business t 

Mr. GiBBs. I studied at Harvard University. 
The Chairman. Is that aU, Mr. Connally? 
Mr. Connally. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Mr. Gibbs, if you know, at the time that you be&^an 
preparing these specifications has the Shipping Board already under- 
taken to get specifications up for the installation of oil fuel ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes; I think they had, because when we started in 
they turned over to us a proposed specification and a proposed plan 
of tne oil-fuel arrangement for the ship, and asked us to consider that 
in connection with the work. 

The Chairman. Did they tell you whether anybody had been asked 
to bid on it ? 
Mr. Gibbs. No; they did not. 

The Chairman. Did they tell you whether they had asked for 
bids on it ? 
Mr. Gibbs. No; they did not. 

The Oelairman. Have ybu adopted their plans and specifications ? 
Mr. Gibbs. No; we have not. 
The Chairman. Inanyd^ree? 

Mr* Gibbs. I would say no to that. Let me just describe brieflv 
what thev were, and you will get an idea. The ship was fitted witn 
coal bunkers arranged along the side of the boiler rooms between 
the skin of the ship and the boiler room^ That bunker you looked 
in yesterday. Now, this plan I am speaking of, and the specification 
I am speaking of. provided for using those bunkers to carry oil, and 
making them tignt, using them for oil tanks. That i3, the original 
coal bunkers alongside' of the vessel. Now, the moment that we 
saw that we felt it necessary to discard it for the reason that that 
arrangement of oil tanks is not allowed under the International 
Convention for Safety of Life at sea. It was signed in 1914, as you 
know, by a lot of the principal maritime countries, and made a 
standard of safety for ships. 

The reason for that is perfectly obvious. Say, you are coming in 
to the port of New York here from the other side, and you had no oil 
in those tanks on the side of the ship, and the ship ran into you at 
rk;ht angles and broke open these side oil tanks, immediately those 
oil tanks that are emjjty would fill with salt water. That would put 
a big weight on one side of the ship and would list it over to a dan- 
gerous extent. 

In other words, it might conceivably capsize if the worst accident 
happended to you, and in any event the ship would take such a severe 
list that it would make launching of the boats very difficult indeed, 
if not impossible, so in view of that we had to discard that, and there 
are no tanks on the side of the vessel at all, except some small settling 
^anks where oil is put in and allowed to separate out and sent by 
puinps to the boiler. So, you see, that completely overturned that 
situation. 

The Chairman. In your scheme for the installation of oil fuel do 
you contemplate carrying oil beneath the floor and skin of the ship t 



1374 SHrPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes, we carry the oil in a double bottom, and that 
double bottom, as I told you yesterday, when we were on the ship, is 
about 2 feet under this floor place that we were standing on, and that 
double bottom is about 6 feet deep, and in certain of these double- 
bottom tanks we carry oil fuel. They are generally about the middle 
of the ship to the forward end, that is where the oil-fuel tanks are in 
double bottom, and after that there is fresh water. 

The Chairman. I do not think you have been asked as to your 
view about the advisability of shifting this steamer over from coal 
fuel to oil; what is your judgment? 

Mr. GiBBS. My opinion is that is exceedingly wise. At the same 
time I think it is exceedingly wise to provide the fittings and the 
tanks and structural work so that the ship can be rapidly put back 
to coal burning if the emergency arises. The greatest difficulty we 
would have in operating that ship as a coal burner would be the matter 
of a crew, getting the necessary amount of firemen and trimmers, 
because it takes an enormous number of them for that ship, and that 
type of labor is exceedingly hard to get and is very unreliable. 

For the sake of argument, say we get into another war and we 
want to use that ship, and the oil supplies are largely in control of 
the enemy, that ship will then have on it a Navy crew. That means 
that the crew problem has been solved. These fellows are on there 
because of their patriotic spirit, and they are there to act as firemen 
and trimmers for patriotic reasons, ana are very anxious and glad 
to do it. You can then run the ship as a coal burner and conserve 
the oil supply of the country for use in first line of battleship defense. 

For the sake of argument I am giving you the extreme case, but 
showing you the reason why it is important to do those things, and 
that has been done in this vessel. 

The Chairman. And this shifting over from coal basis to the oil- 
fuel basis is one of the substantial matters involved in the contract 
and the specifications, is it not ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, the arrangement is one that lends itself to shifting 
over. There is no provision for this being shifted over. All we do 
is to take off the doors — the furnace doors — and store those on the 
pier. 

The Chairman. What I meant was that the cost is one of a sub- 
stantial cost ? 

Mr. GiBBs. No, there is no difference in the cost. 

The Chairman. I do not think you imderstand me. Now, Mr. 
Gibbs, this is a matter of changing over the vessel from coal-buming 
basis to an oil-fuel basis. Is that cost one of the substantial costs oi 
this contract ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Oh, yes. 

The Chairman. That will be ? 

Mr. Gibbs. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, there are 46 boilers in that ship; is it pos- 
sible — this will probably sound foolish to you — is it possible that naif 
of them could be fitted for oil burners and the others left on the coal 
basis ? 

Mr. Gibbs. Well, that has been considered, I mean to say in relation 
to other ships, but it is not a foolish question at all, because it is 
uppermost now; but that has never appealed to me, because you have 
got all the disadvantages of the coal burner and none of the advan- 
*-cjes of the oil. That is the way it figures out in my mind. In other 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1375 

words, I would not think it wise to go to the expense of fitting up half 
of these boilers, and half of the oil-fuel equipment, and depending on 
the half of the coal. The coal slows your turner down, and it com- 
plicates the whole situation, if you have to go to a point where it 
Decame necessary to bum half coal and haff ou you would not fit the 
ship as now arranged to do that. 

The Chairman. Which is the most economical operation under ex- 
isting prices and conditions, coal fuel or oil-fuel, after the ship is fitted ? 
Mr. GiBBS. If the prices were as to-day, the oil fuel would be much 
the cheapest. 

The Chairman. And will that ship have sufficient capacity under 
your specifications to make a round trip with one supply of oil here 
sufficient to make the round trip ? 

Mr, GiBBS. Well, we agreed on this figure with the Shipping Board, 
of 9,000 tons of oil. It should be put on now. Whether it can make 
a round trip or not is all a question of how fast you go. If you run 
at a very nigh speed, it would not be able to make the round trip. 
If you run at a moderate speed, the chances are you would, but the 
way we regulated that was, that we would put on the vessel all the 
oil fuel that we thought it safe to put on the ship, because you must 
see these vessels are designed for a particular draught of water. As 
long as you exceed that c&aught of water you put an undue strain on 
the ship when it gets into the sea and begins to pitch around. 

Now, if we exceed much the designed oraught of the vessel, we are 
going to put a very severe stress on the ship, and it is not a proper 
course of procedure. So, the way we have regulated the amount of 
oil to put on the ship is to put on the maximum amount that we think 
ought to go on the ship, and we have definitely fixed on a draught of 
40 feet, or 40^ feet as the maximum load draught. 

The Chairman. In looking over the ship yesterday I did not see 
any particular space for freight cargo. Does this ship carry some 
freight ? 

Mr. GiBBS. It carries a very small amount of express matter. It is 
not freight in the real sense of the term at all. This is sort of stuff 
that express companies in this country handle. Because of its high 
speed and the large amoimt of space necessary for engines and boilers 
and the additional space that we have had to take for the oil-fuel 
equipment, it has cut the cargo capacity down so that it is small, 
but these large ships never carry very much. 

The Ch[airman. rlow, do I understand that about the time you 
took this boat over and began work on specifications, that there was 
turned over to you some plans to use these coal bunkers for oil tanks ? 
Mr. GiBBS. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. They have been prepared by the Shipping Board? 
Mr. GiBBS. No ; I do not think they have. I could not tell you that 
oflfhand. My impression was they had been prepared by the Todd Co. 
under the Snipping Board's direction, or request, or something, but 
I would not be sure of that; but I think it was tne Tietjen & Lang, 
one of the concerns. The Shipping Board, before they knew what 
they were going to do with this ship, they were making all sorts of 
Uiquiries what to do and how to do it, and one of the tmngs was the 
fitting of the oil fueL and these eventuated from that. 

The Chairman. Now, that is a matter, Mr. Gibbs, that is not 
related to what you might call reconditioning. 



1876 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Gibes. No. 

The Chairman. That is a new project? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Mi^ht not that be more expeditiously and ecor 
nomically handled, if it were submitted for bids, as a separate propo- 
sition, rather than to link it up with the other features more closely 
pertinent to reconditioning ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, we considered that, but the concensus of opinion 
was that it would not be, for this reason. The time of the recondi- 
tioning will depend on the reconditioning of the passenger accommo- 
dation. That is the real reconditioning work. Now, this oil fuel 
equipment can all be, put in as fast as that, and it was estimated in 
less time than the upper work that was going on, so there was no use 
of urging that to a conclusion and getting it ready long before the 
ship should start to run and of course our thought was to centralize 
and concentrate to the maximum extent the work that was to be 
done, simplifying the supervision. 

The Chairman. Sonme of these representatives of private cocems 
at this, you might call it preliminary conference, or the first confer- 
ence before the committees were appointed, I noticed expressed tie 
opinion that the plans and specifications could be prepared in a 
couple of months. Did they understand, you think^ the extent of the 
work which was required to be done before they ventured on that job ? 

Mr. GiBBS. They had not the faintest idea of it. 

The Chairman. And none of their representatives had been on the 
ship up to that time ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I think they had. 

The Chairman. They tad ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And it has taken you frm December 12 to April 3 ? 

Mr. GiBBS. December 3 to April 12. 

The Chairman. Have the I. M. M. in its possession any materials 
which were taken from the Leviathan which are to be replaced in this 
reconstruction work ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, we have made inquiries, as agents, yes; because 
all of the material on the ship is in our charge as agents of course. 

The Chairman. Have you possession of any materials, furnishings, 
or equipment which are not either on the ship, or in the pier, or dock 
adjoining; have you any stored away in any of your warehouses? 

Mr. GiBBs. We have not. 

The Chairman. These materials that you have on the ship there, 
do you intend to use them ? 

Mr. GiBBS. (;h, yes; we use everything that is there. 

The Chairman. A number of chairs were badl}? damaged; they 
will be reconditioned and repaired ? 

Mr. GiBBS. They will, except where so badly damaged that it 
would cost more to recondition it than a new chair would cost. 

The Chairman. Now, if you will answer this question yes or no, 
please: Do you know what became of the material which were on the 
jLeviaihan when she was turned over for war purposes and which are 
not there now ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No. 

The Chairman. You do not know ? 



SHIPPING BO^D OPERATIONS. 1877 

Mr. GiBBS. No. Now, T have got to qualify that because I know 
where some of them are, but I do not know where all of them are. 

The Chairman. Tf you know where some of them are, will you 
state where the some of them are ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Well, there is quite a few pieces of furniture in the 
storage of the Navy Department in South Brooklyn. Then, there is 
quite a lot of the silverware that was sold by the Shipping Board at 
public sale, and was bought by a firm known as Raymond & Co. here, 
and we have a list of that. That is all I definitely know about. 
We have a hst of both of these quantities, and they are considered 
as part of the equipment in this reconditionirgwork, except silver- 
'ware that we will nave to buy if we use it. The rest of it is only 
conjecture. We have written to anybody that has any ideas or 
suggestions, and we go around in a circle and come back to where it 
st-arts. We can not seem to pin it down. 

The Chairman. In your judgment, assuming you get a bid for 
this work which is satisfactory, would it be proper to dry-dock the 
vessel first, or toward tjie end of the work ? 

Mr. GiBBs. Oh, at the end. There is no question about that. 
You see, one of the main purposes of the dry docking is to clean the 
bottom, so when the ship goes to sea it will rim easuy in the water. 
Ctf course, you leave that to the very end, so that you get your 
longest end for the operation of the ship with a clean bottom. 

Tjiie Chairman. Now, did you i)repare all of the plans that you 
have submitted to the accompanying specifications, or did you use 
some of themt which the Navy turned over with the ship? 

Mr. GiBBs. No; there are all the plans [indicating]. 

The Chairman. They are all fresh plans made as a result of work 
done under your direction ? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is right. 

The Chairman. The engines in the ship will still be retained and 
used even though oil should be utilized for fuel ? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is quite right. 

The Chairman. That requires no change in the motive power ? 

Mr. GiBBs. None whatever. 

The Chairman. Of the machinery ? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is right. 

The Chairman. And you agree with Mr. Hague, I think it was 
yesterday, do you, that in installing these different types of burners, 
five diflFerent types which you intend to test, will not necessarily 
make any difference in the location, size, or the installation work of 
the oil feed tanks) 

Mr. GiBBs. I quite agree. 

The Chairman. It would not be just a question of piping, but the 
various types, whichever type is selected ? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is right. 

The Chairman. Now, Mr. Gibbs, can you get a sufficiently accurate 
idea from a test made upon one boUer in the dock so as to be able to de- 
termine which ^rpe of boiler would work better in the battery of 46; 
can you get it from just one boiler, which I suppose will not get up 
steam enough to turn over the propellers very rapidly ? 

Mr. Gibbs. No; it would not turn the propellers at all, I do not 
think. 



1378 SHIPPIKG BOARD OPERATIONS. 

The Chairman. Well, now, do you think you can get a sufficiently 
satisfactory test from just putting them in on one boiler, as I under- 
stood that is what you intend to confine it to? 

Mr. GiBBs. Yes; we can. You see, those boilers are identical, 
and the result that you attain on one of them, if you could get such 
ideal conditions as will obtain in that test, you can duplicate them 
in the 46. 

We duplicate exactly the running conditions on that boiler, because 
we provide a , draft arrangement that draws the same draft of the 
stacK just as if all the ooilers wore in that stack working. In 
other words, we simulate as closely the operating conditions as 

possible. 

The (Chairman. Was that boiler taken at random, or is there any- 
thing about its location or connections ? 

Mr. GiBBs. It was the most advantageous location that we could 
find in the vessel. I want to make another observation. This is 
just the method they use in the Navy for determining this thing. 
They have a testing plant in Philadelphia where they test one type 
of each of their new boilers for their battleships and destroyers, and 
on the result of that test of one type of boiler, and the one boiler, they 
dot(^rmino the type to go into their ships and the performances. 

The ('n AIRMAN. And these five types of boilers which yoii are to 
test (comprise all the available types which, in your judgment, would 
work satisf actorily ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Well, that again is a matter of opinion. I suppose we 
will have other boiler people come in and say their boiler ought to be 
tnst(»d, but we can not test them all. 

Tlie (Chairman. Do the specifications limit them to, say, five types ? 

Mr. GiBBS. Yes; the specifications, I think, are worded to say the 
Inirners will be installed as determined from the tests. 

The Chairman. Limiting the selection to one of these five? 

Mr. GiBBS. Limiting the selection to the boiler that is determined, 
on test, to be the best. We have limited this to five. There is 
nothing that will prevent us putting in more tests if it is thought 
advisable to do it: but I think it is just a waste of money to install 
more than five. They include all the good ones. 

The Chairman. That test can be made to extend over the entire 
period of time nearly that the rest of the work is being carried on f 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it exactly. 

The Chairman. Without interfering with any of the work? 

Mr. GiBBs. That is it. 

Mr. Kelley. Just one more question. I want t6 be sure that our 
minds are right on this paragraph we were considering a little while 
ago. 

Mr. GiBBS. Now, you can go ahead. 

Mr. Kelley. On page 6 it says : "Bids to be submitted in triplicate 
in lump sum for all work herein or hereafter specified or implied." 
That is, "hereinafter" that means in these specifications? 

Mr. GiBBS. That is it. 

M. Kbi^ley. What does it mean, "herein" or "hereinafter"^ 

Mr. GiBBS. It refers to the rest of these specifications. This is on 
the front; all the rest of the specifications follow. 

Mr. B[elley. The first word "herein" refers to this paragraph 
only? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1379 

Mr. GiBBS. No; it does not. 

Mr. Keixey. Every word herein — suppose you had left out the 
word "hereinafter'' wnat would be the difference? 

Mr. GiBBS. What I would have taken it to mean is it would not 
apply to these specifications. This is an entity. This one thing. 
It is supposed to apply to what is in this book, see ? That paragraph, 
that is, as I understand it. 

Mr. Kelley. The "hereinafter/' then, is intended to apply to 
something outside of this book ? 

Mr. GiBBS. No. no; to this book; everything follows that. 
Mr. Kelley. Why doesn't the word '' herein '' cover everything 
that is within those covers ? 

Mr. GiBBS. I think — well, it might. I do not know whether that 

is the choicest word to put in. I do not know whether the word we 

have does not apply lor the paragraph. Now, ''hereinafter," it 

means after this paragraph to the end; but I will be sure to interpret 

it as applying to this Dook. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further? That is all, Mr. Gibbs. 

Mr. GiBBS. Could I make a statement 'i You brought up with Mr. 

Hague yesterday the question of dupUcation and the work on that 

shaft tunnel we were in. Would you like to ask anything on that ? 

The Chairman. Is that work being done by your forces, as agent? 

Mr. GiBBS. It is. 

The Chairman. Is it covered in these specifications? * 
Mr. GiBBS. It is not. 

The Chairman. So there will be no duplication on that? 
3£r. GiBBS. There will not be. 

The Chairman. I received a letter from Mr. Hague in which he 
stated he desired to correct his testimony, and it was my intention 
a little later to call him and permit him to do that for the record 
rather than rely upon the letter which he sent. 

Mr. GiBBS. You will see the provision in these specifications that 
'Says that this does not include work in the engine room, because 
those are normal running repairs that our o^oi forces will make. 
Now, my reason for that is tnis: It is very important, indeed, and 
it is one of our duties for this contract to get together and train 
forces to operate the ship. Now, the most difficult situation we face 
is getting a trained engineering force familiar with that comphcated 
form of machinery. We thought to take the repair work on the engine 
room and give it to our own people, men employed by us, to do it 
ana get them familiar with the ship at the same tune the repair work 
is bemg done. 
The Chairman. I think that is all, Mr. Gibbs. Thank you. 
Is Mr. Smith present ? 
Mr. Smith. Yes, sir. 
The Chairman. Step forward, Mr. Smith. 

TESTHCOHT OF MB. HEITBY BANDOLPH SMITH, IfO. 1 BBOAD- 
WAf , IfEW YOBK CITT, BEPBESENTIITa JAMES SHEWAN 
A SOHS (IVC), BBOOKITV, IT. T. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 
The Chairman. What is your name, please ? 
Mr. Smfth. Henry Randolph Smith. 



1380 SHIPllNG BOARD OPERATIONS. 

The Chairman. What is your business? 

Mr. Smith. I am the New York representative for James Shewan 
& Sons G^nc), dry dockers and shipbuilders. 

The Chairman. Where is your office ? 

Mr. Smith. No. 1 Broadway. 

The Chairman. How long have you been associated with that 
concern ? 

Mr. Smith. Since last August. 

The Chairman. Do you have anything to do with the operations 
of the business ? 

Mr. SMrrn. I do not. 

The Chairman. You take care of the business only here in New 
York? 

Mr. Smith. Here in New York. 

The Chairman. Do you make contracts? 

Mr. Smith. No, sir: I secure the specific^ations prior to the esti- 
mates being made on contracts. 

The Chairman. Did you at any time endeavor to secure specifica- 
tions for the work of reconditioning the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Smith. I did. 

The Chairman. When ? 

Mr. Smith. Foiir or five days following the 15th of April; some- 
where between the 15th of April and the 23d. 

The Chairman. Whom did you see ? 

Mr. Smith. Mr. Gibbs. 

The Chairman. Where? 

Mr. Smith. In his office. 

The Chairman. Just relate what took place? 

Mr. Smith. I went in, and Mr. Gibbs, the chief of construction, was 
not in at the time, but his brother was, and his brother su^ested to 
to me that I wait until he appeared I waited, iust as Mr. Gibbs 
related, stepped out for possibly 20 minutes or half an hour, and 
came back at approximately 4.30 in the afternoon, and when Mr.. 
Gibbs came in I stated my case to him and requested the specifications. 
He neither denied them to me or gave them to me, but I assumed that 
under his power, as he gave it to me, under the Shipping Board, with 
its inunense powers, he would have authority enougn to give me the 
specifications. I insisted on having them, due to my assumption 
tnat he had the authority to give them. I aid not think it was neces- 
sary to go am^where else, and I so reported to my superiors. 

The Chairman. Did he suggest that you see some officials of the 
Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Smith. He said that I should inquire of the Shipping Board, 
and I related that also to my superiors. 

The Chairman. Did you afterwards go to the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Smith. I did not know where to go in the Shipping Board to 
ask for them. 

The Chairman. Did you ask Mr. Gibbs where to go in the Shipping 
Board ? 

Mr. wSmith. I did not. 

The Chairman. You did not go to the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Smith. No, sir. 

The Chairman. I believe that is all. Are there any questions? 

Mr. Steele. No questions. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1381 

Mr. Hadley. None. 

The Chairman. I think that is aU, Mr. Smith. Thank you. 

Is Mr. Fletcher here ? 

TESTIMONY OF MB. AVDBEW FIETCHEB, PBESIDEVT OF 

W. ft A. FLETCHEB CO., HOBOKEN, If. J. 

(The witness was duly sworn hy the Chairman.) 

The Chairman. Your name is what? 

Mr. Fletcher. Andrew Fletcher. 

The Chairman. And what business are you in, Mr. Fletcher? 

Mr. Fletcher. I am president of the W. & A. Fletcher Co. I 
have other businesses, though. 

The Chairman. What kind of concern is that? 

Mr. Fletcher. Why, we are engineers and boilermakers. It is the 
succession of a business which was started in 1852 by my father. We 
are engineers and boilennakers and general contractors for the build- 
ing of vessg^s, and when the war came on we went heavily into the 
repair business. 

The Chairman. Where are your docks, Mr. Fletcher, or your shops ? 

Mr. Fletcher. Out works are over in Hoboken, about opposite 
Twenty-second Street, New York. 

The Chairman. How lar^e a force do you employ ? 

Mr. Fletcher. During wie war we ran at tmies anywhere from 
3,000 to 4,000 men. 

The Chairman. How large a force do you have now — about? 

Mr. Fletcher. I could not say exactly; I would imagine some- 
where around 1,100 or 1,200 men: possibly 1,000 men. 

The Chairman. Is it your brother that is associated with you ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I have a brother, and I have a son. 

The Chairman. Are they both associated with you in this business ? 

Mr. Fletcher. They are both in the company. 

The Chairman. You were present at a conference on December 3, 
by invitation of Mr. Franklin? 

Mr. Fletcher. I was, sir. 

The Chairman.' And heard the discussion there ? 

Mr. Fletcher. Yes, sir 

The Chairman. And later were representatives of vour company 
requested to assist the Chief of Construction of the I. M. M. in getting 
up specifications ? 

Mr. Fletcher. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And did you or your concern receive proposals, 
-with specUications, for the purpose of making a bid upon the recon- 
ditioning of the Leviathanl 

Mr. Fletcher. They did, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you submitted a bid ? 

Mr. Fletcher. We have not, sir. 

The Chairman. How many docks or piers do you have at your 
yard? 

Mr. Fletcher. We have two piers. 

The Chairman. Do you have a dry dock ? 

Mr. Fletcher. No, sir; we are having one built, but it has not yet 
oeen completed. 
The Chairman. WiU that be large enough for the Leviathan ? 



1382 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Fletcher. No, sir. 

The Chairman. And there is none in New York, I understand, or 
in this vicinity, la^e enough ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I do not oelieve there is any dry dock in the harbor 
that possibly could take the Leviathan, 

The Chairman. Now, at any of these conferences that were held 
at which you were present, or to your knowledge when you were 
absent, but at which representatives of your company were present, 
was anythingsaid with reference to including or excluding any certain 
firms or corporations from an opportunity to bid on the Leviathan 
work? 

Mr. Fletcher. Not that I remember, sir. 

The Chairman. Were you ever consulted with reference to the 
qualification of anv particular builder to undertake this wori^t 

Mr. Fletcher. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you familiar in a general way with the docks 
and equipment of the Morse yard ? 

Mr. Fletcher. Generally I am, sir. Since the war has been on I 
have not been down there. I have not been to the Morse yard, I 
suppose, for two or three years. . 

The Chairman. Or to tne Todd yards? 

Mr. Fletcher. Or to the Todd yards. 

The Chairman. The Shewan yards ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I have not been down there, not for two or three 
years, but I think favorably of all the yards. 

The Chairman. Is there water enough at your dock to tie up the 
Leviathan ? 

Mr. Fletcher. No, sir; our piers are not long enough. 

The Chairman. How far are your piers from where the Leviathan 
is now berthed ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I should judge possibly half a mile. 

The Chairman. So that if you decided to submit a bid and were 
awarded the contract, would you be able to carry on the work without 
moving the steamship from where she is at present tied up ? 

Mr. Fletcher. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I think that is all. Are there any questions? 

Mr. Kelley. I might ask Mr. Fletcher if he has decided whether 
or not he is going to put in a bid ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I have not fully made up my mind, sir. As a 
matter of fact, I have been away for about seven weeks. I have been 
to California, got back last Monday to business, and my people will 
finally bring those things up to me, and at that time I will make my 
decision. 

The Chairman. Before you leave, Mr. Fletcher, I think perhaps 
we would like, for the purpose of the record, your other business 
connections. You are President of a locomotive concern, too ? 

Mr. Fletcher. The American Locomotive Co. 

The Chairman. Are you the head of any other active business ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I am president of the Consolidated Iron Works. 
That is a plant directly opposite the Anny piers there at Hoboken. 
We work m conjunction with that plant. Their plant is small, and 
if their work gets too heavy we help them. 

The Chairman. Are you a director in the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I am not, sir. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 138S 

The Chairman. Was it your idea in giving such consideration as 
you have given to the Leviathan work that if you subxnitted a bid and 
were awarded the contract you might have to sublet sotne of the 
v^ork? 

Mr. Fletcher. Oh, yes, sr. 

The Chairman. That is, you are not equipped over at your plant 
to go in and undertake the complete work without subletting some 
of it to other firms ? 

Mr. Fletcher. Why, you take the furniture and such things as 
that, the upholstering — of course, we could not do that, but the 
stTXictural work we could. 

The Chairman. I think that is all, Mr. Fletcher. Thank you very 
much. 

Is Mr. Morse here ? 

TESTIMOVT OF lOt. EDWABD P. MORSE, PKESIDEITT MOESE 

DRT DOCK CO., BROOKLYN, N. 7. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 

The Chairman. Your name is what ? 

Mr. Morse. Edward P. Morse. 

The Chairman. Are you head of the Morse Dry Dock Co. ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How long has that firm been in existence ? 

Mr. Morse. Since 1884. 

The Chairman. What business does it engage in ? 

Mr. Morse. Dry docking, rebuilding, and repairing ships. 

The Chairman. Have you been domg any work fi)r the Shipping 
Board recently ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you engaged in some work for them now? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Where is vour plant ? 

Mr. Morse. At the foot of Fifty-sixth Street, Brooklyn. 

The Chairman. Is that beyond the bridge ? 

Mr. Morse. . Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How many docks have you ? 

Mr. Morse. Two. 

The Chairman. Do you have a dry dock? 

Mr. Morse. We have two dry docks; yes, sir — oh, we havejfour 
piers and two dry docks. 

The Chairman. You were invited to attend a conference, with 
reference to the reconditioning of the Lemathan, by Mr. Franklin ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you attended the conference? 

Mr. Morse. I did. 

The Chairman. And subsequentlv did you or some of your force 
assist Mr. Gibbs in getting up specifications ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir; we detailed a man. 

The Chairman. What ships have you reconditioned or repaired 
for the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Morse. Why, we have not reconditioned many for the Ship- 
ping Board. The last one was the Huvon, Our work has been mostly 
rf avy work, and some Army. 



1384 SHIPFmG BOABD OPERATIONS. 

The Chairman. Was the Huron work the result of a competitive 
bid by your concern ? 

Mr. JJoRSE. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And that work has recently been oompleted ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir; just completed. She wiU sail on Saturday 
to South America. 

The Chairman. Has she been delivered? 

Mr. Morse. Practically. 

The Chairman. Is she being operated by some company 1 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir; by the Munson Co. 

The Chairman. Who prepared the contract for that work, if you 
know? 

Mr. Morse. The Shipping Board, I believe. 

The Chairman. Were the specifications also prepared for that? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you assist in the preparation of the specifi- 
cations? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; we had nothing to do with it. 

The Chairman. Were there any extras for that work, or will 

there be ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. I have never known a job of that kind 
whore extras did not come up. 

The (/HAIRMAN. You have seen the specifications for the work on 
the Le/i'iathant 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I want to ask whether or not, in your opinion as a 
practical man engaged in this business, the specifications for perform- 
ing the work under the contract are such as to prevent claims for 
extras ? 

Mr. Morse. Why, there are clauses in that specification that we 
obiect to, and we have already prepared a letter to that effect, and I 
taKe it that relates to extras. 

The Chairman. Have you sent the letter yet? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You have not submitted a bid yet, have you ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir. * • ' 

The Chairman. Had you been aboard the Leviathan before this 
conference of December 3, Mr. Morse? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Was it you that expressed the opinion at that 
conference that the plans might be prepared in a couple of months? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you think an unreasonable length of time has 
been taken in netting tip these plans and specifications ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; 1 think I was wrong in my estimate. 

The Chairman. Was your contract with the Shipping Board for 
the restoration of the Huron completed on time ? 

Mr. Morse. Why, we went a little over our time, but that was 
occasioned by waiting for material, and bad weather and changes 
that came up. 

The Chairman. Changes in the specifications ? 

Mr. Morse. No; additional work that developed. 

The Chairman. Additional work that was not included in the 
contract ? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1385 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether or not the quality of your 
-work has met with the approval of the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir; it has. 

The Chairman. And during the progress of that contract was there 
any complaint or did any necessity arise whereby you had to take 
out work and do it over again ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; not that I know of. 

The CiiAiRBiAN. Was there any penalty in the contract that you 
had for failure to deliver on time ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes. 

The Chairman. Are you in any way related to or associated with 
Charles W, Morse ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; in no way whatever. 

The Chairman. I think that is all — ^just one other question. 
While I do not care to have you divulge the contents of any conmiu- 
nication that you are sending to the Shipping Board with reference 
to this Leviataan work, I do understand that you object to certain 
clauses in the specifications relating to extras. Perhaps you would 
be willing to state whether or not, ii you decide to bid and should be 
awarded the contract, you could complete the work tmder the con- 
tract and specifications without the necessity for extras. 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; I do not believe we could. 

The Chairbian. I think that is all. 

Mr. Kelley. In the experience that you have had in refitting the 
Shipping Board ships which have been assigned to you do you recall 
the percentage of extras that you have been allowed on the base 
contract ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; only on the Huron, I should say about 15 to 
20 per cent — from 10 to 20 per cent. 

Mr. Kelley. It would possibly average 15 per cent? 

Mr. Morse. Possibly. 

Mr. Kelley. Now, on the Leviathan, which is so very large and 
where the improvements that are to be made are so diverse — uphol- 
stery, painting, and all that kind of thing — ^possibly the extras would 
run more ? 

Mr. Morse. I do not believe the percentage would be larger. 

Mr. Kelley. Possibly about the same ? 

Mr. Morse. About 10 per cent, I should think, roughly. 

Mr. Kelley. So that you would expect in the neighborhood of 
$800,000 or $1,000,000 in extras there in the normal course of events ? 

>fr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. That nobody could foresee ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir; that is right. 

Mr. Kelley. Or provide against in such cases ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. If you were compelled to sign a contract for a lump 
sum, being a prudent man, if you were not to be paid for extras, what 
would you do ? 

Mr. SloRSE. I would have to raise my price accordingly. 

Mr. Kelley. You would put $800,000 or $1,000,000 more in your 
lump sum, would you not ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

1770eS— 20— PT 4 ^10 



1386 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

The Chairman. Mr. Morse, at any of these conferences at which 
you were present did you hear any statements made with reference 
to including or excluding any particular firms or corporations from 
the opportunity of bidding for this work ? 

Mr. Morse, rf o, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you familiar with Mr. Fletcher's plant i 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And with Mr. Todd's plant ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And Mr. Shewan's plant ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you able to undertake all this work at your 
plant without having to sublet any of it ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; we would sublet. I think any concern would. 

Mr. Kelley. Have you and Mr. Todd and Mr. Fletcher ever taken 
work rather in conjunction with one another to any extent ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. You are active competitors ? 

Mr. Morse. We are active competitors; ves, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. And you are not in the habit, any of you, of taking 
a contract and subletting a part to each of the others ? 

Mr. Morse. Oh, no; absolutely not. 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Morse, you stated that the Shipping Board 
allowed you extras on the Huron amounting, according to your esti- 
mate, to 1 or 1 5 per cent of the work ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. What was the character of those extras ? 

Mr. Morse. That was work that could not be foreseen. In tearing 
out parts of the ship work developed which could not be foreseen. 

Mr. Steele. They were outside of the contract itself ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Have you read the specifications sent out for the 
Levidthan ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. As you interpret those specifications, would extras of 
that character be allowed under the Leviathan specifications ? 

Mr. Morse. I do not quite understand that. 

Mr. Steele. Have you read the specifications sent out for the work 
proposed to be done on the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Morse. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Under those specifications, as you interpret themt 
would extras of the character of those that would probably be re- 
quired be allowed under the Leviathan contract ? 

Mr. Morse. No, sir; they would not. 

The Chairman. That is all. Thank you very much, Mr. Morse. 

TESTIMONY OF MB. WILLIAM H. TODD, PRESIDEHT TODD 
SHIPYAKD COEPOEATION. NEW YOEK, CITY. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 
The Chairman. Your name is what 1 
Mr. Todd. William H. Todd. 

The Chairman. You are the head of the 

Mr. Todd. The Todd Shipyard Corporation. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1387 

The Chairman. How long has that concern been in operation? 
Mr. Todd. About four years. 

The Chairman. Have you a plant elsewhere than at New York? 
Mr. Todd. Yes. 
The Chairman. Where ? 

Mr. Todd. One in Seattle and one at Tacoma. Previous to the 
Todd Shipyard Corporation I was president of the Robbins Dry Dock 
& Repair Co. : I had been associated with them for 25 years. 
The Chairman. Where? 

Mr. Todd. At Erie Basin, Brooktyn. Then the Todd Shipyard 
Corporation has the Todd plant in Tacoma, the Todd dry dock in 
Seattle, the Tietjen & Lang plant here in Hoboken, about three 
blocks from Fletcher's, and tne Robbins plant in Erie Basin. 
The Chairman. How many docks have you at the plant here? 
Mr. Todd. At the combined plant, eight. 
The Chairman. And how many dry docks? 

Mr. Todd. Oh, that was dry docks I was speaking of. We have 
eight dry docks. 
The dii airman. How many piers ? 
Mr. Todd. Thirteen. 

The Chairman. Were you present, by invitation of Mr. Frankhn, 
at a conference held on the 3d of December, at which was discussed 
the matter of reconditioning the Leviathan ? 
Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And later did some of your force assist in the prep- 
aration of the specifications for that work ? 
Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. At that conference did you hear discussed the 
matter of including or excluding any other firms from an opportunity 
to bid for this work ? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir. As a matter of fact, there was nothing like 
that discussed. It was simply to get the knowledge, the best Imowl- 
edge, that Mr. Franklin thougnt he could get, and ne got us all stirred 
and keyed up to the point oi trying to help him to get that knowl- 
^ge. There was no question of what we were going to bid or how 
we would bid, or anything like that. 

The Chairman. Have you received any compensation for the as- 
sistance you have given thus far in the work you have done in helping 
draft the specifications ? 
Mr. Todd. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there any understanding that you shall receive 
any compensation ? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir. I might qualify that statement, if you please. 
My recollection is that previous to this conference — I thinlc two 
months before, or a month, or something of that sort — ^Mr. Hague 
consulted with our chief engineer, who is a very high-class man in 
oi\ burning. I think every shipbuilder and shipowner recognizes 
that. He siiggestod going over the idea of the possibiUty of con- 
verting the Leviathan from coal to oil, and Mr. Millan and he had 
been getting their data together to see whether it would be feasible 
^nd economical or not. We made up some plans and suggestions, 
laade up some sort of tentative specification, showing about where 
the oil would be carried, how much oil she would carry, and how 
niuch oil she would bum. That I am not so sure about; I do not 



1388 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

think we were, but I am not sure we were not paid for getting up those 
plans. But that was previous to December 3. 

The Chairman. Were you ever asked to bid on those plaus and 
specifications by the Shipping Board? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir; not yet. 

The Chairman. Are those the plans and specifications that are 
included in the specifications for the work on tne Leviaihan nowt 

Mr. Todd. I do not think so, but I am not acquainted enou^ in 
detail with them to say. My understanding is that the question 
of the oil is not just settled yet. I do not know whether I am right 
in that. 

The Chairman. Have you read the specifications? 

Mr. Todd. In a general way; I had the high spots picked out of it 
by some of the fellows that can see high spots. 

The Chairman. You think there are some high spots in the 
specifications ? 

Mr. Todd. Yes. [Laughter.] Yes, sir; and I can understand why 
they are in there. I would not want anything different from that 
specification if I was going to deal with Mr. Franklin and Mr. Gibbe 
or any other commercial man. I can understand why they put 
them in. But they are a sort of buffer between the Government and 
us, and I would not mind standing on it with them being the buffer. 
But I do not know whether — there have been so many changes in 
this thing that I do not know where Mr. Gibbs will be when we start 
this work, and I do not know where Mr. Franklin will be. I have 
had these memoranda picked out, and I have got them. I told Mr. 
Gibbs yesterday — I did not have a letter written — ^but I told Mr. 
Gibbs I was coming over to see him, and I am sure some of these 
we can eliminate. But I do not believe that any one of these is 
deliberately meant just to cover up something tnat might occur. 
I believe tney have got everything in there that possibly could be 
got in to guard against extras. 1 have never seen a specification 
tnat guarded against extras as well as this specification, out if the/ 
were insistent that they would not cut them out. then I have got 
to do the other thing; I have got to add on, for tne reason that, as 
I said, I do not know yrhether they are going to be here or not. I 
have got to consider that there might be some other fellow in here 
that (fid not have any talk with me and that I did not go over and 
point these things out to. 

The Chairman. Having read these specifications and considered 
the matter, assuming that you made a bid and were awarded the 
contract, do you believe that extras would develop under the opera- 
tions of that contract with those specifications? 

Mr. Todd. No, I do not; not to a lar^ extent, even if he eliminated 
some of these items. Some are all right. Maybe they are all all 
rijght in his opinion, but I am going to talk to him before I make a 
bid. I do not look forward to any big extras in this. 
The Chairman. You do not? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir; I do not see where they are. If there are any, 
then our fellows have been lax, too. I think the young man we had 
representing us in making up the specification — ^he is the young man 
that was in charge of converting the boat to carrying troops. Our 
Tietjen & Lang plant did that. He knows the general layout. He 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1389 

tagge<L everything and marked everything, and in the back of his 
head he thought he might get the job to put it back. I do not 
know where it has gone, but that is wny he tagged it. [Laughter.] 

The Chairman, mt. Todd, has your concern done any work on the 
Leviaihant 

Mr. Todd. We fitted her up for carrying 8,100 troops — the Tietjen 
& Lang plant did that. 
The Chairman. But since she has been turned back? 
Mr. Todd. Since December 3 % 
The Chairman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Todd. I believe our Tietjen & Lang plant are installing an 
oil burning proposition, so that tne different oil burning companies — 
by the way, tnere have been two new ones sprung up smce the 
£eviaihan got in the market. They are fitting up the piping, I 
believe, for the different burners to be tested on a boiler. And they 
are getting paid for that, but not our boy that we had getting up the 
data. 

The Chairman. You do not understand, do you, Mr. Todd, that 
your representative participated in making the final draft of these 
specifications to be submitted to your concern to be bid upon ? 
Mr. Todd. I do not catch that. 

The Chairman. I say you do not understand, do you, that your 
representative participated in making the final draft of these specifi- 
cations to be submitted to your concern for a bid ? 

Mr. Todd. I know he did not; no. He only eot the data as he 
remembered it and as in his judgment it should be done. Then 
that was all turned over to Mr. Gibbs. They are the fellows to 
decide how it is going to be put in, and as Mr. Gibbs said, he does 
not care a damn for us. He is not looking out for us. He told you 
90. [Laughter.] 

The Chairman. Have you constructed any tanks to be put upon 
the Leviathan ? 
Mr. Todd. No, sir. 
The Chairman. You have not? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir. Our original suggestion — I do not know that 
it meant that we were to construct the tanks, only to use the coal 
bunkers, the double bottoms, etc.; but then the question of the 
3tabihty of the ship came in, which we were not as fully acquainted 
with as some of tne other shipbuilding concerns. I do not mean 
by that that we have got some technical points. God did not send 
them all to Philadelphia, you know. 

The Chairman. Have you any burners or material on hand there 

for testing purposes whicn vou expect to put into the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Todd. No; we would have to manufacture them as required. 

The Chairman. If you decide to bid and are awarded the contract, 

are you prepared to undertake this entire work, or will you have to 

sublet some of it ? 

. Mr. Todd. There is not any one of our vards that is big enough^ 
m my opinion, to do that work, and the oiggest of our vards is as 
l^Jg as, if not bigger than any other yard nere. It will take the 
^mbined — I do not mean the combined full capacity of the Tietjen 
. ^^ plant and the Robbins plant, but it wul take a big part of 
% 80 as to leave the balance of each plant itself to do commercial 
^^rk. It would not be good business, and I do not believe one of 



1390 SHIPPING BOARD 0PERATI0K8. 

our plants could successfully carry it out, for one of our {dants to 
put its force into that job. 

The Chairman. Is there water enough at either of your piers to 
berth the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir. 

The Chairman. So it will probably be necessary, if you were 
awarded the contract, to carry it on where she now is docked? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you ever done any work of reconditioning 
ships for the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What vessels? 

Mr. Todd. I do not think I can remember the names. I do not 
know whether Mr. Franklin's boats — ^were the Shipping Board boats 
turned back? I do not know; maybe the Shipping Board here know. 

The Chairman. What boats have you done recently? 

Mr. Todd. For instance, the Philadelphia^ the Si. Paul, the 
Mongolia, and the New York. We have reconditioned the Fori 
Victory and the Fort Hamilton^ the Bermuda boats. 

The Chairman. Was that done under coinpetitive bids? 

Mr. Todd. No. Mr. Franklin's boat was, 1 think, the St. Paul" 
bids were asked, but we were the only bidders. The others were 
done on a lump-sum contract price. 

The Chairman. Did those contracts have similar specifications to 
these in them ? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you interested in oil burners, sir? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir; the White oil burner. 

The Chairman. Is that the burner that is being put in for testing 
purposes in the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Todd. That is for our purposes, and then every other fellow 
that has a burner comes along and puts his burner in. 

The Chairman. That is the one you are haying tested ? 

Mr. Todd. As I understand it, we are putting in the piping, so 
that every fellow can come and attach his burner to that piping ^ 
test it. The success of the burner is not in the piping. When 
we test our burner, we take the burner off, and the other fellow 
comes and puts his burner on. 

The Chairman. But the White burner is the one you intend to 
submit for test ? 

Mr. Todd. That is right; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And vou have put the piping in for all the tests? 

Mr. Todd. That is right. 

The Chairman. You have a plant at Tacoma? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 

ThQ Chairman. That is the plant which several of the committees 
visited. Is Mr. Wiley here now? 

Mr. Todd. No, sir; he will be here in about a week. 

The Chairman. He is still out at Tacoma? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir; he leaves there Sunday. 

The Chairman. Have you ever made any arrangement with Mr. 
Morse or with Mr. Fletcher or their representatives, about doing 
work for which you have had the contract ? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPBBATIONS. 1391 

The Chaibman. And subletting it or dividing it up? 
Mr. Todd. No, sir. 

The Cblairman. You are a competitor of these other yards about 
here? 

Mr. Todd. I think that is one of the reasons Andy Flethcer is 
building a dock — ^because we do not let him have ours. [Laughter.] 
I think Andy could tell you better about that. I know that is so. 
We can not; it is not good business. 

Mr. Keljley. You have been in this business a great many years, 
Mr. Todd, as I recollect it. 
Mr. Todd. Since I was 13 or 14, during vacations. 
Mr. EIblxet. I did not quite understand your answer to a ques- 
tion asked by Mr. Walsh, whether you are willing to sign a contract 
based on these specifications just as they stand? 

Mr. Todd. I might, as far as the specification refers to it. But 

to be frank with you, having heard what has gone on here to-day, 

I just do not know what mv position will be. For this reason: I 

know that not only I, but Fletcher and Morse and Franklin and all 

of them have put in a lot of work on this job, and there has been 

a lot of responsibility on somebody over there taking care of that 

ship, and tnere is not anybody in our line of business that. did not 

know that the Leviathan 'was going to be reconditioned or asked to 

be reconditioned. The Navy Knew it, and everybody else knew it. 

So that at this late day, after we have done our work and got our 

data — ^I believe it has cost us at least $10,000 to get up our estimate 

on this thin^. 

We have oeen holding meetings every Monday night, our different 
plants, to get our figures together; I do not believe it is fair, and T do 
not believe I will go and put in a bid, and then when that bid is 
opened just have it {hrow:n to one side. That may be legally right, 
but it is not morally right, and it is not fair. 

Tlie navy yard should be asked to bid. These other fellows should 

be asked to bid, and they should either bid or else forget the job 

altogether. My special interest in this thing is to stop somebody 

from getting it at cost plus. They are not goin^ to give it to me on 

that. I am not going to take it; I do not want it. ido not think it 

is fair now to find fault if our bids are not right. The navy yard has 

a ri^ht to bid against us, and they knew she was in the market, and 

nothing would suit me better, and it would not hurt my feelings if you 

would take her to the navy yard; but I hope you will let tne New 

York Navy Yard do it. I am speaking now for the benefit of the 

ship. There is not a man that I nave come to yet that knowa about 

what this is going to cost, except from five to ten million dollars. 

That is a hell of a margin. [Laughter.] If a fellow can not come 

nearer to it than that, he has not got brains enough to know whether 

our bid is too high or too low. Tne worst of it is that we will never 

know, and perhaps you will never know, what it will cost in the navy 

yard; but 1 do not want it myself and I do not want anybody else 

to get it on a cost-plus basis. 

Ido know there has been a lot of hard work done on that ship, and 
as far as I know there has been no discrimination against anybody. 
It would not hurt me. As a matter of fact, it seemed that the more 
got in there the more ran away from it. 



1392 SHIPPIKG BOARD OFERATIOHS. 

Where Mr. Gibbs refers to the Navy, that he would be criticized 
for it, maybe he would. But the Navy has not been given a job on 
a lump sum since we went to war that I know of; it is aU cost plus. 
The specification is all right on cost plus; there are no high spots in it. 
I do not want any cost plus; I won't take it at cost plus unless you 
take the plant and make me take it; but you won't have my per- 
mission. 

I think you are getting at a point, gentlemen, where you ought to 
be making up your minds, and 1 can not understand why somebody 
does not know approximately what that boat is going to cost to be 
put into condition. If they don't know, they don't Know whether 
they are going to be able to support her on her runs. 

Mr. Kelley. You, first, will have to satisfy yourself as to what 
it will cost before you put in vour bid ? 

Mr. Todd. That is right. As far as I am concerned, yes; but when 
I put it in 1 do not want some fellow to say that this is too much and 
we will take it to the navy yard. Let the navy yard come in and 
put in their bid. Let Mr. Morse and all the rest of them come in and 
put in their bid. 

Mr. Kelley. The implication of your suggestion is that if the navy 
yards are going to bid the time should be extended a little ? 

Mr. Todd. ) do not know. I do not need any more time. I will 
be ready with my bid. 1 f they are not ready with theirs, it is not my 
fault. 

Mr. Kelley. They have had as long to prepare their bids as you 
have ? 

Mr. Todd. Absolutely. That is their fault; it is not mine. Every 
fellow has had his time to do that, you know. And there are some 
shipbuilders, I think — I do not know whether you have got the right 
idea. There are some shipbuilders that were at that conference that 
said they could not see their way clear to bid. That was only due to 
the fact of their being so far away. There were shipbuilders at that 
conference that, if the ship was as near their plants as she was to our 
plant at New York, they would put in their bids, especially the New- 
port News. 1 think Joe Powell said the same thing. 

Mr. Steele. Who is Joe Powell ? 

Mr. Todd. At Fore River, with the Bethlehem Co. 

Mr. Kelley. Will your bid be based upon the theory that the 
specifications do or do not permit extras, which ? 

Mr. Todd. Well, as I say, I am wondering if you are not asking me 
to disclose something before the 15th. [Laughter.] Not purposely, 
though — I do not mean that, Congressman — but there are some com- 
petitors of mine in this room. 

Mr. Kelley. Well, you need not answer that question. 

Mr. Todd. I thought you would agree with me along that line. 

Mr. Kelley. Have you ever signed a contract to make changes 
due to the error of the owner without extra compensation, up to this 
time ? 

Mr. Todd. No; I have not. I do not believe that that is what is 
meant in this, but that is what some other fellow would say it meant. 

Mr. Kelley. WTiat else could it mean? It says that no extra 
charge can be made for correcting mistakes. Does it not say that? 

Mr. Todd. Yes. That might apply to some trifling thmg. It 
certainly would not mean if they wanted an extra ladies' barber shop, 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1393 

that that was an error. It would certainly not mean that. [Laugh- 
ter.] 
Mr. EJBLLEY. It might be an omission. 

Mr. Todd. I do not believe there are many omissions here. We 
have to furnish lipsticks in the ladies' barber shop under that. 
[Laughter.] So I am not afraid of the extras. I believe after Mr. 
Gibbs and I get through we will put in a bid on this specification, 
unless he finds that he can not on account of being afraid of you 
fellows, and that he has got to leave it in. And if he does that, I am 
going to add on to it; that is all. 

Mr. E[ell,ey. What is your experience, Mr. Todd, is it like Mr. 
Morse's, as to the amount of extras you have had to add to ships 
heretofore ? 

Mr. Todd. That varies, Congressman, due to the parts of the ship. 
For instance, that grows larger in a big engine job. You will bid 
on an engine job, and after getting part of it done, you will find the 
bed plate cracked. It is only one piece, but that runs into great big 
money. 

Mr. Kelley. Would it not run into money in plumbing quite a 
good deal ? 

Mr. Todd. No ; not in this case, because this plumbing has all got 
to be renewed or replaced, and that means a pretty good cleaning out. 
Mr. Keuley. And the painting ? 

Mr. Todd. That is a great big job, but everything that is there has 
got to be painted, and all we put up has got to be painted. It cer- 
tainly would not mean, if he calls for three coats of paint and wants 
us to give him another one, that that is an error- that is a damn fool 
proposition, and h« would have to pay for it. [Laughter.] 

Mr. Kelley. As to the question of taking the old paint off, I sup- 
pose there would be some question about that sometimes, would 
there not ? 

Mr. Todd. No; the old paint ought to come oflF. I imagine every 
bit of old paint that is on that ship ought to come off. 
Mr. Kelley. Even off of the staterooms? 
Mr. Todd. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. How about the repair of the furniture there ? Does 
that run into a lai^e item ? 

Mr. Todd. I do not believe there is any there. The single thing 
that scares me about this proposition more than anything else, it is 
not the work that we do; it is that we have to supply the tapestry 
and pictures, and we are justified in making a charge for that. 1 
mean, for our profit in connection with the handling of it. I do not 
know what sort of pictures these fellows like. [Laughter.] But I 
believe there is a little balance wheel there, inasmucn as they say 
you can not go over a certain amount. Is there not, Mr. Gibbs ? 
Mr. Gibbs. That is right. 
Mr. Todd. So that does steady that a little. For instance. 




shipbuilder's proposition, 
put in there so as to avoid criticism from you fellows. 

Mr. B^ELLEY. The specification does not permit that much latitude 
in the rugs, does it ? Doesn't it say just oriental rugs ? 

Mr. Todd. Oriental rugs, with a limit as to the price. 



1394 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Kelley. Not lower than a certain amount ? 

Mr. Todd. Not higher than a certain amount. 

Mr. GiBBS. No; not lower. 

Mr. Todd. Then it is worse than I thoujght it was. [Laughter.l 
I thought there was a limit. Isn't there a limit there that we are to 
work on? 

Mr. GiBBS. No; *'not lower than." 

Mr. Todd. How is it on the carpets and furniture and the rest of 
that? 

Mr. GiBBS. It is not lower than so much a yard. If you want to, 
you can put in higher priced stuff. [Laughter.] 

Mr. Todd. Yes, sir; I know that. I tell you, Congressman, I have 
spent too much time on this to throw it overboard, but if I have any 
idea that my bid is going to be taken in just for some fellow to see 
what I think about it, that is not good business, and I am not going 
to put any more work on it. I do not think it is fair. And then we 
have put in that much time. I have not attended any conference 
but one, and that was the one that Mr. Franklin attended, and about 
the method of carrying on the repairs and how it should be done 
I said there — that was December 3 — and I have not said anjrthing 
since except to our own force. 

The Chairman. Mr. Todd, if the navy yard could submit a bid for 
this work and your bid was lower, you would expect that you should 
get the work, would you not ? 

Mr. Todd. Yes. 

The Chairman. Now, if the navy yard should submit a bid and it 
was lower than your bid, you womd have no complaint if the work 
were awarded to the navy yard ? 

Mr. Todd. Absolutely none. 

The Chairman. And the work that you have done in assisting the 
agent, the I. M. M., turning over the data and enabling them to pre- 
pare specifications, has been done by your concern in good faith ? 

Mr. Todd. Yes. 

The Chairman. And you expect that if you submit a bid you will 
have that considered in good faith? 

Mr. Todd. Only to the extent of the price 

The Chairman. Yes; but you expect that they will consider your 
bid in good faith ? 

Mr. Todd. That is right; ves, sir. 

The Chairman. And if other bidders should submit bids that are 
lower than yours, you do not ask, because of this work you have 
done 

Mr. Todd. Not a bit. 

The Chairman. Or the expenditure you have made, that you be 
given any preference? 

Mr. Todd. Not a bit. I won't get it, either, and I don't want it. 

The Chairman. I think that is all, Mr. Todd. Thank you very 
much. 

TESTIMONY OF MB. JOHN L. CXJRLET, GEVEBAL MANAGEB 
JAMES SHE WAN & SONS (INC.), BEOOKLTN, N. T. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 
The Chairman. Your name? 
' Mr. CuRLEY. John L. Curley. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1395 

The Chairman. What is your business? 

Mr. CuRLEY. General manager James Shewan & Sons (Inc.). 

The Chairman. What work do they engage in, Mr. Curley? 

Mr. Curley. Drydocks, general ship repairs, general refitting. 

The Chairman. Where are the yards ? 

Mr. Curley. Foot of Twenty-flfth, Twenty-sixth, and Twenty- 
seventh Streets, South Brooklyn. 

The Chairman. Above the bridge? 

Mr. Curley. On this side of the oridge. 

The Chairman. How many docks have you there ? 

Mr. Curley. We have 10 dry docks. 

The Chairman. And how many piers ? 

Mr. Curley. Well, we have got room there to berth 30 steamers at 
one time. 

The Chairman. Do you engage in ship repair work? 

Mr. Curley. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you done any reconditioning work for the 
Shipping Board, or the I. M. M. or other concerns? 

mr. CSdrley, We have done all kinds of ship repair and ship fitting 
work for the Shipping Board, but we have never done any work for 
the I. M. M. Co. 

The Chairman. Have you done reconditioning work? 

Mr. Curley. No ; we have not done any of the reconditioning. 

The Chairman. How large a force do you emplov over there ? 

Mr. Curley. WeU, during the war we ran as high as 7,000 men. 
At the present time I judge we are in the neighborhood of 2,000. 

The Chairman. What work are you doing there now? 
" Mr. Curley. We are doins all classes of work — ^local work, ship- 
yard work, and regular mercnant steamers. 

The Chairman. Have you seen the specifications for the recondi- 
tioning of the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Curley. I just saw them for a few moments, that was all, not 
to ffo into them thoroughly. 

The Chairman. Have you made a sufficient examination of them 
to be able to state whether or not you could put in a bid for doing 
that work ? 

Mr. Curley. From the examination I made of the specifications I 
would judge something along the lines that Commander Crisp said 
yesterday; on the stand here, that he could figure according to the 
specifications, but in order for a contractor to cover himself he would 
have to figure on what they call ' 'intent." That *' intent" means 
just how far your imagination is going to carry you. Of course, there 
is no job you can not figure on. You can figure a job for $6,000,000, 
and say, '* WeU, there is an intent here, and we will figure a whole lot 
more and put in a figure of $7,000,000." 

The Chairman. Is your plant over there sufficiently eauipped and 
have you a sufficient force so that if you were one of the Diaders and 
secured the contract, you could carry out the contract, do you think ? 
Mr. Curley. I consider we are as well equipped to do that work as 
either Morse or Bobbins, and I consider we are far better equipped to 
do it than the Fletcher Company. 

The Chairman. Have you a force of skilled men similar to those 
concerns ? 



1896 SHIPFINQ BOABD 0PBR4TI0HCk 

Mr. CuRLEY. We have a similar force of skilled men to Uiose 
concerns that I mentioned. Further on that subject, when the 
(}uestion of our fi^urin^ on the LevicUhan came up, Mr. Shewan 
instructed me at tnat time to make arrangements to figure on the 
Leviathan and to get as lar^e a force as was necessary to take care of 
thejob — that is, the technical men. 

Tne Chairman. Have you conferred with any of the Shipping 
Board officials relative to being permitted to bid upon the LevuMan\ 

Mr. CuBLEY. The first I knew of the specifications on the LemsQkan 
was a couple of weeks ago. Our representative in New York, Mr. 
Smith, called me up and told me he heard the specifications were out 
on the Leviathan. I told him to go to the Shipping Board and get a 
copy, and he called me back later and said they were not being issued 
by the Shipping Board, but that they were being issued by the 
I. M. M. Co. So I instructed him to go to the I. M. M. Co., and see if 
he could not get them. He called me up later in the afternoon and 
told me he had been there to see Mr. Gibbs, or Mr. Gibbs' brother, I 
think it was, and was unable to secure any specifications, but that he 
was to go back in the morning. So I says, ' * You follow it np now, 
and if you can not get the specifications let me know." So he called 
me up later and told me that Mr. Gibbs absolutely refused to give 
him tne specifications. 

The CuAiRMAN. Did he tell you Mr. Gibbs suggested he would 
have to see some Shipping Board oflScials about that? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No, he did not teU me that at that time. 

The Chairman. Did you suggest to him that he see the Shipping 
Board people ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No. I asked him at that time when the bids went 
in on the Leviathan, and he said the bids went in on the 15th. I 
said, "How long have the specifications been out?" **Oh,'' he 
said, ''thev have been out for several weeks." ^*Well," I said^ 
'4t is too late now in case we do get them." 

The Chairman. Did you yourself see any Shipping Board official 
about the matter? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No, sir; I did not. 

The Chairman. Did you see any of the officials of the I. M. M. 
about the matter? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No, sir; I did not go to see them, because it was too 
late when we were informed rhat the specification was on the market. 

The Chairman. What ships have you reconditioned or repaired 
over there? 

Air. CuRLEY. Oh, we have reconditioned — ^well, in fact, for the 
the past four months — take the present year; I should say we have 
done very nearly $2,000,000 worth of work for the Shipping Board. 

The Chairman. On what ships? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Oh, I could not just call the names. They were 
not refitting jobs; they were general repairs and general work on 
la^e ships. 

The Chairman. What kind of work? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Carpenter work, joiner work, iron work, machinist 
work, pipe fitting, electrical wort — everything along the same line 
as the Leviathan. 

The Chairman. How long has this concern been in existence) 



SHIPPINO BOABD OPERATIOHS. 1397 

Mr. CtJBLEY. The James Shewan concern was organized 50 years 
ago, with one dry dock. Today we have 10 dry docks, and we 
have the largest ship repair plant in acreage in the port of New 
York. 

The Chairman. How long have you been with them ? 

Mr. Cdrley. I have been with them, sir, for 16 years. 

The Ghairhan. How many acres are there in vour establishment? 

Mr. CuRLEY. I should say we have upwards of 50 acres of ground. 

The Chairman. And are you ecjuipped with shops to do machine 
work and joiner work and plumbing work? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Yes, sir; we are equipped with all kinds of shops 
that are used in the marine trade. 

The Chairman. Have you ever had any difficulty with tl^e Ship- 
ping Board on any of the work you have done? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No, sir; none whatever. 

The Chairman. Has that work been done under contract? 

Mr. CuRLEY. All the work I have got in the past year has been 
mostly under tender, or contract. 

The Chairman. Under what? 

Mr. CtJBLEY. Under what we call tender — ^imder contract, sub- 
mitting bids. 

The Chairman. A lump sum ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No, sir; submitting bids in competition. 

The Chairman. To do the work for a lump sum ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Yes, for a lump sum; that is right. 

The Chairman. For a specified sum ? 

Mr. CuRL-EY. For a specified sum; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you doing any work for the Shipping Board 
now? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Yes; I suppose we have about six or eight of their 
ships over there now. 

The Chairman. What are some of them ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. I think the Eldana is one, and the Vincent is 
another 

Mr. Kelley. I am not surprised that you can not think of the 
names of the Slupping Board ships. 

Mr. CuRLEY. They are so fimny it is a hard matter to remember 
them. 

The Chairman. And you are engaged on Shipping Board work 
now? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Yes, sir; I am. 

The Chairman. If you were permitted to submit a bid and were 
awarded the contract, could you tcJke the Leviathan at any of your 
piers? 

Mr. CuRLEY. No, sir; I could not. 

The Chairman. How far away are they from where the Leviathan 
is now docked ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Oh, I should say we are a couple of miles away from 
there, at least. 

The Chairman. Would it be your intention to do the work where 
the Leviathan is now tied up ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. It is the onlv place I could do it. 

The Chairman. I think that is all, Mr. Ciu*ley. 



1398 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Afr. CxjBLET. In reference to the statements some of the other m&i 
made that were on the stand here this morning, especially Mr. Gibbe 
and Mr. Franklin and Mr. Haeue yesterday, in r^ard to the abiUtT 
of our plant to handle the work on the Leviathan, I would like to call 
attention now that I don't remember of Mr. Franklin ever being at 
our plant. I don't remember of Mr. Gibbs ever being at our plant. 
I don't remember performing any work for the I. M. M. Co. As for 
Mr. Hague, I recall him being at the plant one Sunday afternoon for 
about an hour and a half when the snops were closed. 

Another statement was made here this morning that the Fletcher 
Co. was better prepared to do the woodwork and joiner work than 
James Shewan & Sons. Now, James Shewan & Sons were engaged 
for all of 34 years in nothing but carpenter and joiner work, and it 
is only 'within the last few years that the Fletcher Co. have started 
to do their own joiner work. 

Mr. Franklin and Mr. Gibbs referred to the North River steamers 
that have been fitted out by the Fletcher Co. Now, the woodwork 
on the North River steamers was sublet to Roland and another out- 
side carpenter firm. So I consider we are far better adapted to do the 
work on the Leviathan than Fletcher is. I will admit that the Rob- 
bins Co. are a little better adapted than ourselves, due to the way 
that the Tietjen & Lang plant is situated. 

The Chairman. What is the Robbins Co. ? 

Mr. CuBLEY. That is a part of the Todd Shipyards Co. 

The Chairman. Mr. Curley, assuming you got the contract for this 
work, would you be able to do all this work or would you have to 
sublet some of it ? 

Mr. Curley. We could do the whole job ourselves, outside of the 
furniture and upholstering and that kind of stuff that we do not 
handle. 

The Chairman. To vour knowledge, has your concern been asked 
to submit a detailed plan of your plant to the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Curley. Here last Saturday, just about as I was to leave the 
office at 4 o'clock, a young man came in and said he represented 
Mr. Hague, and he wanted me to go over some plan he had of our 
plant, and I told him to come around on Monday. That is the only 
plan. 

Mr. Kelley. Have you seen the specifications, Mr. Curley? 

Mr. Curley. Yes, sir; I just seen them for a few moments. 

Mr. Kelley. Where did you get them ? 

Mr. Curley. Mr. Fisher showed me the specifications. 

Mr. Kelley. It came through this committee ? 

Mr. Curley. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. How did you say you got the specifications? 

Mr. Curley. This committee showed me the specifications. 

Mr. Steele. The committee showed you the specifications? 

Mr. Curley. This committee; yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Did you ask for them from the committee ? 

Mr. Curley. Did I ask for them ? No. 

Mr. Steele. How did they happen to show them to you ? 

Mr. Curley. Mr. Fisher showed me the specifications. 

Mr. Steele. How did he happen to show you the specifications ? 

Mr. Curley. He wanted my opinion on them, I suppose. 

Mr. Steele. He asked you for your opinion ? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 189& 

Mr. CuRLEY. Yes. 
Mr. Steele. When was that ? 
Mr. CuRLBY. Only a few days ago. 

Mr. Steele. For the piu^pose of having you testify here ? 
Mr. CuRLEY. I do not know what he wanted, whether he wanted 
me to testify on it or not. He is here himself. I guess he can 
answer that. 

Mr. Steele. Did you know that he was going to submit them 
to you? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Did I know he was going to submit the specifications- 
to me? 
Mr. Steele. Yes. 

Mr. OuRLEY. Yes, I knew he was going to submit them to me. 
Mr. Steele. When did you know that ? 
Mr. Cltiley. Well, when he told me. 
Mr. Steele. What day was that ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. That was on — let me see now, so I can get it exact. 
That was on Satiu'day. 

Mr, Steele. Did you have any acquaintance with Mr. Fisher 
before that ? 

Mr. Cltiley. Had I had any acquaintance with Mr. Fisher before 
that? No. 
Mr. Steele. That was the first you saw of him ? 
Mr. CuRLEY. That was the first I saw of him. 
Mr. Steele. Was there any reason why he should hunt you up and 
submit the specifications to you ? 
Mr. CuRLEY. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Steele. Now, Mr. Curley, you say your plant is as large as 
any of these other plants, and that you have reconditioned a number 
of large ships. What ships did you recondition ? 

Mr. Curley. I did not say I reconditioned a number of large ships. 
I said I have repaired and made alterations and work of that kind 
on a number of large ships. 
Mr. Steele. You have done repair work on a number of large ships ? 
Mr. Curley. Yes. 

Mr. Steele. With reference to reconditioning them 

Mr. Curley. I have not reconditioned any of the ships, no. 
Mr. Steele. Your plant in in a j^osition to recondition ? 
Mr. Cltiley. Our plant is in condition to do it. They say they 
have reconditioned a lot of ships that were mostly I. M. M. ships. 
Those ships were not put out for competitive tender. They were put 
out to the Todd Shipyard Corporation to be refitted, so I had no 
chance to submit a tender on them. The fact that we have not 
reconditioned any vessels is not due to the fact that we have not the 
facilities; it is due more to the fact that we have not had the oppor- 
tunity. 

Mr. Steele. I am only asking you with reference to your experi- 
ence, Mr. Curley. What is the lai^est ship in tonnage that vou nave 
reconditioned ? 

Mr. Curley. Well during the war we reconditioned — well, we 
refitted; I wouldn't say reconditioned — ^we refitted the ifartha Wash- 
ington and several of the other big transports. 

Mr. Sfeele. What is the difference that you have in mind between 
refitting and reconditioning ? 



1400 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. CuKLEY. Well, it was a different class of work. This job on 
the Leviathan — ^I suppose that is what you are referring to — that is 
entirely different from what was done during the war. It is a diff ereit 
class of work. In fact, this job is something that no one in the port 
of New York has ever done — a job of exactly the same nature. 

Mr. Steele. What is the largest ship you have ever ratted f 

Mr. CuRLEY. The Martha Wa^hingtoUy that we refitted during the 
war, or I would say fitted out for the war. She was, I suppose, a 
10,000-ton ship. 

Mr. Steele. What was the character of the refitting done there? 

Mr. CuRLEY. She was refitted for war purposes. 

Mr. Steele. Simply for war purposes? 

Mr. CuRLEY. That is. all. 

Mr. Steele. What are the other large ships that you have refitted! 

Mr. CuRLEY. Well, we have had the Saranac over there. She was 
another large ship — ^from the Navy Department. 

Mr. Steele. What was her tonnage? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Around 5,000 tons. We had the Sobrel for the Army 
transport service. We fitted out the K, /. Luckenbach for the Army 
transport service. 

Mr. Steele. What was their tonnage? 

Mr. CuRLEY. They were all around 10,000 tons. 

Mr. Steele. A 10,000-ton ship, then, is the largest you have 
refitted ? 

Mr. CuRLEY. Ten thousand is about the largest; yes. The same 
thing could apply pretty much to the other yards, outside of those 
that hav6 done the I. M. M. Co. boats, and the fact that we were 
confined to a 10,000-ton ship is no reason why we could not do a 
50,000-ton ship if we had the water to accommodate her. 

The Chairman. That is all, Mr. Curley. 

TESTXMOITT OF AVDBEW FLETCHEE — Sesuned. 

Mr. Fletcher. Mr. Chairman, I have heard this gentleman just 
speak regarding the Fletcher Co., and I feel that he is misinformed. 
He does not reidize what the Fletcher Co. has been doing, and we are on 
record as having outfitted a great number of the transports last year. 
My son says we had 20-odd on competitive bids here in the harbor, 
out of 52. 

My concern has been established since 1852. We have been the 
general contractors for some of the Fall River Line steamers, such as 
the Prisdlla, the PurUanj and the Plymouth, Nearly all the Hudson 
River steamers. We were the general contractor for the Hudson 
River Day Line steamers, and the Wa^hinffton Irving and the Hendrik 
Hudson, the big night steamers. 

I thought possibly you might get the impression that the Fletcher 
Co. were not familiar with woodwork. When the occasion arose for 
the Fletcher Co. to ^o into this work aggressively, the Fletcher Co. 
put up a great big joiner shop. We filled it with the most improved 
tools. The character of our work has been like yacht work, hign-class 
work, which we have done ourselves. I only say that in justice to 
us, because you gentlemen do not know us. 

Of course, in this port of New York there is great competition, and 
it may be that in these competitive bids we have received more work 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1401 

than they thought the Fletcher Co. should have had. Mr. Todd here 
here made the remark that the reason we were building a dry dock — 
that the reason Andy Fletcher was building a dry dock — was because 
he would not let us use his dock. I only instance that to show that 
there is competition here in the port. There has been strong 
competition. 

I do not know what I have done to James Shewan & Sons or to this 
gentleman who has made these remarks. To be sure, before we had 
our own joiner shop we did sublet, but the fact is that all work was 
done under our supervision, and in many of those cases I had charge 
of the designs. 

I was not here this morning, but evidently some reference was made 
to my concern, and if they spoke well of it I wish to thank the gentle- 
men for having done so. I think our record over a long period of 
time has been a good one. 

I might also say that the Fletcher Co. contracted for and built the 
first three turbine steamers built in the United States. We built the 
turbines ourselves. It may be possible somebody felt that from our 
familiarity with the coiistruction of the turbines if anything came 
up on the Lemathan^s turbines, we would have the men and the 
technical knowledge to do it. 

I might also say that the Fletcher Co. have built Pike boilers, and 
we are familiar with the construction of the boilers on the Leviathan, 
When I was on the stand and called attention to the Consohdated 
Iron Works, you asked me if I was interested in any other company. 
Our Consolidated Iron Works did work on the boilers for the Levid- 
than in the early part, before this matter came up. 

Perhaps I am presuming in this thing, but on the other hand I felt 
after hearing this gentleman's testimony that it was just to my con- 
cern that I should make some remark about it. I make it also, sir, 
without any f eeUng of unfriendliness to the concern or any concerns. 
I think my testimony shows that. When you asked me particularly 
about Shewan's and these others, I spoke well of aU. I said they were 
allgood plants. 

The Chairman. Just a single question, Mr. Fletcher. We are 
perfectly willing to have your statement. Would it make any differ- 
ence to you in your bid, or in your consideration of the bid, if you 
knew that the Shewan Co. was one of the competing bidders ? 

Mr. Fletcheb. Absolutely not. Mr. Walsh. Our bid would be 
made up as we see it, irrespective of anybody else, and if we put in 
our bid and lost it, that would end it. 

The Chairman. Have you bid in competition with that company 
for other work ? 

Mr. Fletcher. I think we have bid in competition with a great 
many concerns; in fact, all the concerns in the harbor of New 
York. My son just told me here that last year out of 52 transports 
our company received 22 of them in competition. 

I was prompted to ask this indulgence on your part, because the 
impression mi^ht have been given that we were not qualified to do 
work of that kind. I thank you. 

177068— 20— PT 4 11 



1402 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

TESTmOinr of JOHV L. CUBLET— Besvmed. 

Mr. CuRLEY. May I speak for one minute, Mr. Chainnan ? I did 
not intend to say anything discreditable to the Fletcher Co. That 
was not my intention. What I wanted to say was the fact that 
before the war there were only three concerns that were considered 
.the largest in the port of New York, that received specifications on 
repairing ships of any description, and that was Morse, Robbins, and 
Shewan. During the war tiie Fletcher Co. due to their location in 
Hoboken, have come to the front rapidly, but at the same time it has 
never been conceded in the port of New York that they were larger or 
better equipped to handle any kind of work on any kind of vessel than 
James Snewan & Sons. That is all I wish to add. 

TESTIMONY OF MB. JAMES SHEWAN, PRESIDENT JAMES 
SHEWAN & SONS (INC.), BEOOKLYN, N. Y. 

(The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.) 

The Chairman. Your name ? 

Mr. Shewan. James Shewan. 

The Chairman. What is your business, Mr. Shewan ? 

Mr. Shewan. Dry-docking business and ship repair business. 

The Chairman. How long have you been in that business ? 

Mr. Shewan. Thirty years. 

The Chairman. Where? 

Mr. Shewan. In New York and Brooklyn. 

The Chairman. Where is your plant located ? 

Mr. Shewan. At the foot of Twenty-seventh Street, Brooklyn. 

The Chairman. Have you been doing work for the Shipping ^oard 
during the past three or four years ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes. 

The Chairman. What character of work ? 

Mr. Shewan. All charact(?rs, everything on a ship that comes in a 
shipyard. 

The Chairman. Dry docking and repairing and refitting? 

Mr. Shewan. General repairs, outside of upholstering work and 
furniture work. 

The Chairman. Have you seen the specifications for the work on 
the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you personally ever endeavored to secure an 
opportunity to bid ? You, yourself, I mean. 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you ever had any difficulty with the Ship- 
ping Board arising out oi work that you have done for them ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you ever done any work for the I. M. M. f 

Mr. Shewan. Not to my knowledge. 

The Chairman. Have you ever bid for their work ? 

Mr. Shewan. I do not know that. 

The Chairman. Have you a technical staff at your establishment I 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What does that staff cover ? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1408 

Mr. Shewan. All departments. 

The Chairman. Do you prepare specifications for work ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes; u necessary. 

The Chairman. Have you ever looked over the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You have never been aboard her ? 

Mr. Shewan. Never been aboard her. 

The Chairman. Have you ever asked to go aboard ? * 

Mr. Shewan. No. 

The Celairman. So, you do not know the nature and character of 
the work from anjthing you have seen yourself, either on the ship 
or in the specifications, that is necessary to be done to recondition her ? 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you make any distinction between recondition- 
ing a ship and the kind of work you do at your yard ? 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. From your experience and knowledge of the work 
you do. do you know of anv reason why you could not imdertake this 
work if you had submitt^a a bid and been awarded the contract ? 

Mr. Shewan. Not any more than anyone else ; the same situation. 

The Chairman. You are a competitor of Mr. Fletcher ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And Mr. Todd ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Ajid Air. Morse ? 

ifr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What other concerns are there of like character 
and similar capacity here in New York ? 

Mr. Shewan. Well, the Morse, Todd, and Shewan concerns are the 
big concerns. The Fletchers are in the large repairs without dry- 
docks. There are shipbuilding concerns in New York City — on 
Staten Island, the Downing Shipbuilding Co. And at Shooters 
Island there is a big shipbuilding company, called the Standard 
Shipbuilding Co. They got the contract for one of these German 
ships, but they did not award it to them subsequently — a large con- 
cern. There is also the Federal Shipbuilding Co., belonging to the 
Steel Trust, in Newark. Then, there is the Submarine Boat Corpora- 
tion, another large shipbuilding concern. While they are new, they 
are building ships. 

The Chairman. These are shipbuilding plants you are talking 
about ? 
Mr. Shewan. Yes; but they could do this work. 
The Chairman. I am asking what other concerns there are like 
yours and Mr. Fletcher's and Mr. Todd's and Mr. Morse's ? 

Mr. Shewan. There is the Shooter's Island concern that I men- 
tioned, called the Standard Shipbuilding Co., and the Staten Island 
Shipbuilding Co., on Staten Island, and that constitutes the large 
concerns. 

The Chairman. From what knowledge you have of the work to 
be done on the Leviathan, Mr. Shewan, ii you were awarded that 

contract would you be able to undertake the entire work, or would 

you have to sublet some of it ? 
Mr. Shewan. We would undertake that work just on the same 

position exactly as anyone else. We might be congested, we might 



1404 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

be busy at the time, and might have to sublet some of it, and we 
mi^ht not. 

The Chairman. Do you know of any reason, Mr. Shewan, why 
you were not asked to 6id upon the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Shewan. No. 

The Chairman. "Do you know of any reason why you could not 
submit a bid on the Leviathan ? 
' Mr. Shewan. No. 

The Chairman. Do you know of any reason why, if you were 
permitted an opportumty to examine tne specifications, you co«ld 
not submit a bid for that work ? 

Mr. Shewan. No reason. 

The Chairman. Have you ever done any work such as installing 
staterooms, taking out and reinstalling new plumbing and fixtures, 
rewiring a ship, truing up turbines and dynamos, repainting, install- 
ing oil-burning apparatus, putting in oil tanks, and other work of 
that character ? 

Mr. Shewan. We are always doing it. 

The Chairman. Have you instaUed oil-fuel apparatus on any 
Government ships ? 

Mr. Shewan. I can not say Government ships. 

The Chairman. What ships have you ever put oil fuel on ? 

Mr. Shewan. Standard Oil ships. 

The Chairman. Tankers? 

Mr. Shewan. Tankers. 

The Chairman. Have you ever done it on a passenger ship ? 

Mr. Shewan. I do not think so. 

The Chairman. Have you ever taken out plumbing and piping 
and reinstalled new plumSing and fixtures ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. On Government ships ? 

Mr. Shewan. All the time. 

The Chairman. What Government ship ? 

Mr. Shewan. I do not know; we are doing it all the time on these 
ships. 

The Chairman. Are you doing work on Government ships all the 
time? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How do you get those contracts ? 

Mr. Shewan. By competition. 

The Chairman. Competitive bidding ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Qblairman. For a lump sum? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. • 

The Chairman. Have you done any cost-plus work for the Gov- 
ernment ? 

Mr. Shewan. All through the war. 

The Chairman. How large a force have you got over at your 
plant now, Mr. Shewan ? 

Mr. Shewan. I do not know now; 2,000 or 2,500 men. 

The Chairman. With reference to the labor supply here, have you 
had any difficulties with labor at your plant ? 

Mr. Shewan. No. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 1405 

The Chaibman. Have you secured the work on any Army trans- 
ports? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes. 

The Chaibman. Did you bid for work against the other concerns 
here? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chaibman. These transports which Mr. Fletcher secured, 
you were a bidder on? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. We did some of them. 

The Chaibman. You seciured some af them ? 

Mr. Shewan. Oh, yes. 

The Chaibman. And you have bid against Mr. Morse for work ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chaibman. Aiid also against Mr. Todd ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The Chaibman. And have you ever had any difficulties with any 
of those concerns ? 

Mr. Shewan. I never had anything to do with them except to 
fight them. That is all I know anythmg about — no difficulties. 

The Chaibman. You mean, by fighting them 

Mr. Shewan. In competition; that is all. 

The Chaibman. Fighting against them in business ? 

Mr. Shev^an. That is all, sir. 

The Chaibman. Have you ever had any difficulty with any other 
concerns here which have done work for tne Shipping Board ? 

ifr. Shewan. No, sir. 

The Chaibman. Have you ever had any difficulty with any con- 
cern that has done work for the I. M. M. that you know of ? 

Mr. wShewan. We have not had difficulty with anyone. 

The Chaibman. While you are a competitor with these various 
other companies here about New York, are you on friendly terms 
with them all ? 

Mr. Shewan. I know the principals. I meet them in the Dry 
Dock Association now and again. They go their way and I go mine. 
That is the way I run my business, ancl they do the same. 

Mr. Kelley. You know of no reason, Mr. Shewan, why the 
Shipping Board might not be willing for you to bid on this work, do 
you? 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir. - 

Mr. Kelley. You never have had any difficulty adjusting claims 
for extras or anything of that kind ? 

Mr. Shewan. No, sir; always found them very fair. 

Mr. Kelley. You were surprised, I suppose, not to be included in 
this? 

Mr. Shewan. I felt I had been discriminated against. I resented 
that. That hurts our business. It puts us second class. If that 
ff;ct is known it does us harm. There is a reason for that. It would 
appear that we are not competent, or a good' many things, and we 
do not like that; we resent it. 

Mr. Kelley. You probably did not hear Mr. Gibbs's statement 
about it yesterday, did you ? 
Mr. Shewan. No, sir; I was not here. 

Mr. Kelley. I do not know that it was Mr. Gibbs : I guess it was 
Mr. Hague made the statement that those were included who had 



1406 



SHIPPIKG BOARD OPERATIOKS. 



actually done reconditioning of ships, and that your firm had had no 
opportunity, or at least had had no experience in that particular 
thing, and that was why they left you out ? 

Mr. Shewan. He had no right to say we had no experience. 
Mr. Gibbs does not know anything about us, to my knowledge, 
except from hearsay. 

Mr. Kelley. Possibly he had in mind the complete rehabilitation 
of a ship; that is to say, these shi]>s that had been used during the 
war as troopships, putting them back in condition for use for pas- 
sengers. I suppose that statement would be correct, would it not! 

Mr. Shewan. Wo were doing troopships all the time during the 
war. 

Mr. Kelley. "^'ou were putting them into troopship condition ? 

Mr. Siiewax. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. But have you since the war put any of them back 
as passenger ships ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes; there was a big German shii) lying three 
blocks away from us: I don't know the name of it. We put in 40 or 
50 staterooms. She was about a 45,000 or 50,000 ton ship. We 
had a bill of half a million dollars for plumbing and everything in 
connection with it. That was reconditioning. 

Mr. Kelley. If Mr. Hague had the impression that you had not 
done any of this roconditionine, he was mistaken ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes; but wa did that for the Navy. 

Mr. Kjbllet. But it was experience that you had had, though, 
and was to your credit ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, certainly. 

Mr. Kelley. Mr. Todd's particular concern was reconditioning 
for the I. M. M? Did you state that? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. I know he had their work; yes. 

Mr. Kelley. Does he do all their work? 

Mr. Shewan. I do not know that. 

Mr. Kelley. So you feel that if the Shipping Board officials had 
had full information about your plant, and giving them credit for 
wanting to do what was right all around, they would have included 
you in the bids ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

The CiLA^iRMAN. ilr. Shewan, you are an active competitor of the 
Todd, - Fletcher, and Morse concerns here in New York. I would 
Uke to ask you this question. Assuming that those three concerns, 
after having seen the specifications, submitted a bid which was 
identical for reconditioning the Leviathaiif from your knowledge 
and experience would you imdertake to say that you could do that 
work for the same sum that was fixed by these other three concerns t 

Mr. Shewan. I would not do it. 

The Chairman. You would not do it? 

Mr. Shewan. I would want to know what I was doing, m^^rself . 

The Chaibman. Wdl, suppose you had seen the specifications 

Mr. Shewan. Would I do it for a price that they nad established t 

The Chairman. Assuming that these bids should come in and 
they all make the same bid. 

Mr. Shewan. In money? 

The Chairman. Well, that is what the bid would be, is it nott 

Mr. Shewan. That Ls what I would assume. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1407 

The Chairman. Would you undertake to say that you could do 
the work' for that amount? 

Mr. She WAN. No. 

The CbaAiRMAN. You would want to make an investigation, study 
the specifications, and see the ship ? 

Mr. Shewan. Absolutely. 

The Chairman. And then make your bid ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Shewan, you have stated that you have done 
Government work i 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Did you do any Government work previous to the 
war? 

Mr. Shewan. Oh, now and again. The Government always did 
its own work then. 

Mr. Steele. Not always ? 

Mr. Shewan. Not always; once in awhile they did not. 

Mr. Steele. As a matter of fact, did you do any Government 
work previous to the war? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir; for years. 

Mr. Steele. What was the character of it? 

Mr. Shewan. General repjairs. 

Mr. Steele. Reconditioning any ships ? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes. Yes; we have for the revenue cutter service. 

Mr. Tteele. What is the size of the cutters? 

Mr. Shewan. They are small vessels — 1,000 tons. 

Mr. Steele. And not any large ships ? 

Mr. Shewan. None of the regular Navy ships. 

Mr. Steele. On the various ships that you repaired during the 
war, was the work done under contract with the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Shewan. Cost plus. 

Mr. Steele. Under contract with the Shipping Board or the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation ? 

Mr. Shewan. No; cost plus with the Navy Department. 

Mr. Steele. With the Navy ? 

Mr. Shewan. With the Navy Department. 

Mr. Steele. That was during the war? 

Mr. Shewan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Wliat was the size of those ships ? 

Mr. Shewan. All sizes from 25,000 tons down. 

Mr. Steele. Wliat was the vessel? 

Mr. Shewan. That big ship that I was trying to think of ; that was 
the biggest. I don't remember the name. 
Mr. Steele. What was the work done there ? 
Mr. Shewan. General work on staterooms, plumbing, electrical 
work, painting, outfitting. 

Mr. Steele. You furnished there something like 40 or 50 state- 
rooms, you said ? 
Mr. Shewan. Yes. It might have been twice that for all I know. 
Mr. Steele. If it was twice that you would know it, would you not ? 
Mr. Shewan. No, sir; I don't know what is going on. The vessel 

was four or five blocks away, and I don't know how many men they 

kept working there. 
Mr. Steele. Have you any contracts with the Navy Department 

uow? 



1408 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Shewan. No; they have ceased operations; they are doing 
it themselves now. 

Mr. Hadley. Referring to this 25,000-ton contract with the Navy 
Departments 

Mr. Shewan. That was not a contract; that was cost plus. 

Mr. Hadley. That was not let upon competitive bidding ? 

Mr. Shewan. No. 

Mr. Hadley. I do not desire to ask the question then. 

The Chairman. I think that is all. Thank you, Mr. Shewan. 

Mr. Franklin, there is a question or two we would like tc> ask you. 

TESTIMGITY OF ME. P. A. S. FBAHKLIH, PBESIDENT IHTEB- 
N ATIOV AL MEKCAVTIIE MABIHE CO.— Besnmed. 

The Chairman. With reference to refitting or reconditioning the 
I. M. M. ships, do you know what firm has done that ? 

Mr. Franklin. rodd!s, Tietjen & Lang's, and Fletcher's. 

The Chairman. What proportion, would you say, has been done 
by the Todd concerns ? 

Mr. Franklin. Why, I should say a little over a third. I would 
rather not guess at that. I can give you a list of the sliips if you 
want them. 

The Chairman. Has the Fletcher concern done the larger share? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, if you take Tietjen & Lang and Todd to- 
gether, then I would s^y that they did a full 50 per cent. But I 
would rather have the figures looked up on that. 

The Chairman. Was tnat done by competitive bidding? 

Mr. Franklin. I think the St. Pavl was done by competitive 
bidding, but I am not sure about that. The others, no. 

The Chairman. The others were just on a contract basis? 

Mr. Franklin. It was reaUy cost plus on the others. 

The Chairman. Have you ever asked the Shewan Co. to bid on any 
work that you might have had ? 

Mr. Franklin. None of the work of reconditioning the passenger 
ships. My recollection was that the Shewan's used sometimes to do 
the dry docking and repairing of some of our steamers, but these 
gentlemen say no. My recollection is that we have had ships in their 
dry docks. 

The Chairman. But that was before the war, I take it? 

Mr. Franklin. That was before the war. 

The Chairman. You have heard the testimony this afternoon, and 
I think you heard Mr. Hague testify yesterday with reference to the 
Shewan Co., the reason that he thougnt they were not considered? 

Mr. Franklin. I heard his testimony yesterday; I do not know 
whether I heard all of it or not, but I thmk I did. 

The Chairman. I will ask you if there is any reason that you know 
of, other than the fact that perhaps they may not have a sufficiently 
equipped technical staff in the judgment of the Shipping Board 
officials, or perhaps in the opinion of Mr. Gibbs — do you know of any 
other reason why this one concern that had been competing witn 
Fletcher, with Todd, and with Morse, should not have been given an 
opportunity to bid on the Leviathan f 

Mr. Franklin. I faiow absolutely no reason whatsoever except the 
reasons given by Mr. Ha^e and ourselves. 

The (&AIRMAN. Now, m yiew of the fact that on all other work this 

•»cern had been a competitor with the three other private yards in 



SHIPPING BOARD OPBEATIONS. 1409 

this vicinity, more than the New York Ship, the Bethlehem, Cramps, 
and Newport News — ^might they not, without prejudicing the inter- 
ests of the agent or owner, have been considered aud asked to submit 
bids upon this work ? 

Mr. Franklin. There is no reason why they should not have been 
considered that I know of. As I stated to you this morning, when the 
matter was considered, we considered that we were covering the 
ground, and we acted in good faith on those lines. 

TheCHAiRMAN. I think that is all. Are there any further questions t 

Mr. Kelley. I think Mr. Franklin testified yesterday tnat there 
was no financial relationship whatever between his concern and the 
Todd's and the Fletcher's ? 

Mr. Franklin. Absolutely none. 

Mr. Kelley. Do you know whether or not any of your directors 
personally might be interested in the Todd's or the Fletcher's ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; I never heard of it. 

The Chairman. "That is all. Thank you very much, Mr. Franklin. 

The Chair would like to state that the gentlemen who have been 
summoned and who have been heard by the committee and who are 
now here are excused. If the committee desires their further attend- 
ance we will communicate with them, or will see that another sub- 
poena is issued, but I think we will not require the further attendance 
of the gentlemen who have been heard. The committee desires to 
thank you, and we are sofry we may have put you to some incon- 
venience. 

(Thereupon, at 6.40 o'clock p. m., the committee adjourned to meet 
at 9.45 o'clock a. m., to-morrow, Wednesday, May 12, 1920.) 



Select Committee on 
United States Shipping Board Operations, 

House of Representatives, 
New York City, Wednesday, May 12, 1920. 

The committee met at 9.45 a. m., at room 804, No. 45 Broadway, 
offices of the United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Cor-, 
poration, pursuant to adjournment from yesterday, Hon. Joseph 
Walsh (chairman) presiding. 

Present also: Representatives Kellev, Hadley, Steele, and Connally. 

The Chairman. The committee wifl please come to order, and I 
will ask ^fr. Hague to take the stand agam. 

TESTntOHY OF M£. EOBEET LTOBTS HAGUE— fiesnmed. 

The Chairman. Mr. Hague, you sent me two letters with reference 
to your testimony, in which you stated you desired to correct certain 
statements which you heretoiore made. Refreshing your recollection 
from the letters, will you please state what correction you desire to 
make in your answers previously given. 

Mr. ECague. As I remember a question you asked me, it was 
whether or not, to my knowledge, the I. M. M.. or any official of the 
I- M. M., was interested in any of the firms wno had been asked to 
quote on the reconditioning of the Leviathan. I answered in the 
negative, thinking only of me repair firms in the port of New York. 
As a matter of fact, the International Mercantile Marine Co. is inter- 



1410 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

ested in the New York Shipbuilding Co. I wish to make that 
correction. 

The other question you asked me, as I remember the question, 
was: Was the work that I noticed going on on the Leviathan work 
done by the agents as covered in the specifications ? There was cer- 
tain painting work that you noticed wnen you visited the Le^^than. 
I replied that I did not know, but would investigate. Upon investi- 
gation I find out that the work of cleaning and painting which yon 
noticed was being done by the crew and was not included in the 
remiirements of the specifications. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further that you desire to cor- 
rect? 

Mr. Hague. There was one other thin^ yesterday. From the ques- 
tions propounded I did not know whetner you were of opinion that 
the Shipping Board had entered into contractual relations with any 
firm witn a view of installing oil-burning equipment. I desire 
to state that the Shipping Board had not entered or contemplated 
at that time awarding the oil-burning outfit or the oil-burning instal- 
lation to any firm. TTie correspondence, which you have in an exhibit 
I furnished to you, was brought about in this manner: A veiy serious 
discussion resulted in the Shipping Board as to whether or not it 
would be advantageous to fit the Leviathan witii oil instead of coal. 
Mr. Rossiter at that time was director of operations and was my 
superior. He instructed me to prepare figures to show whether or 
not the Leviathan would be a more advantageous vehicle for the 
Government if burning oil than if burning coal. In order to prepare 
those figures, it was necessary to acquire a certain amount of pre- 
liminary information. We acquired that certain amount of j>reliin- 
inary information, such as where the oil might be carried, the esti- 
mated cost of this installation, and estimated cost of equipment. 
This was to enable me to put before the board a concrete statement 
as to whether or not the Leimthan should })e fitted for oil instead 
of coal. 

The Chairman. Did you call for any bids on the work ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. We caUed for estimates. But that was %nth 
a view to giving us an idea of the cost. 

The Chairman. Those estimates were based upon using the coal 
bunkoes as tanks ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you prepare those plans? 

Mr. Hague. My force, in connection with draftsmen from Tiet- 
jen & Lang, prepared those plans. 

The Chairman. Did you near the testimony given on yesterday 
that the carrying of oil of that character was prohibited by the clause 
or regulations of the International Conference on Safety at Sea? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Would you say that that was so ? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What was the idea in preparing plans of that 
character ? 

Mr. Hague. It was a study of one of the many schemes for fitting 
the Lex^iathan with oil. 

The Chairman. You would not want to fit her with something 
that was prohibited by law or regulation, would you ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1411 

The Chair^ian. Of what value was an estimate of cost of some- 
thing that could not be done anyhow ? 

Mr. Hague. If we had known at the time of that restriction, we 
would not have gone ahead with it. I did not know of it at the time 
nor until Mr. Gibbs called my attention to it. 

The Chairman. That restriction was the result of a conference 
held in 1914, wasn't it? 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you have anj^ soHcitor or counsel of the 
Shipping Board assigned to your particular department ? 

Mr. Hague. I have now. At that time I was a subordinate under 
Mr. Rossiter and reported everything to him. 

The Chairman. And/ Mr. Rossiter, apparently, did not know of 
this international regulation or law, or at least said nothing to you 
about it at any of the conferences? 

Mr. Hague. He did not know but depended on me to find oul 
those things. 

The Chairman. Are there any further corrections of your testi- 
mony which you wish to make ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Are there any questions which any of the members 
of the committee wish to ask ? 

Mr. Steele. Mi*. Hague, you said the International Mercantile Co. 
was interested in the ISew York Shipbuilding Co. -^ 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Was that a corporate? interest or an individual in- 
terest of stockholders or directors 'i 

Mr. Hague. I do not know personally, but I understand it is a 
corporate interest. 

Mr. Steele. Do you know the extent of that interest? 

Mr. Hague. No; I do not. 

Mr. Steele. Were they asked to bid on any of this work^ 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. On what part of it ? 

Mr. Hague. The New York Shipbuilding Co. were asked at this 
early conference to take part with a view to bidding on the entire 
job. But at that time they stated thoy would be glad to help, but 
would not bid. 

Mr. Steele. That they would not bid ? 

Mr. Haglt:. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. What I wanted to know was whether those specifi- 
cations as finally agreed upon were given to them to bid upon ? 

Mr. Hagl^e. They were given to the New York vSliipbuilding Co.; 
ye^, sir. 

Mr. Steele. They were given to the New York Shipbuilding Co ^ 

Mr. Hague. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Did they bid ? 

Mr. Hague. Bids are not to be in until May 15, but they have 
stated verbally that they are not going to bid. 

Mr. Steele. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Has the date of the opening of those bids been 
postponed ? 

Mr. Hague. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Was it ever contemplated opening them on the 
1st of May? 



1412 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Mr. Hague. When it was first talked of it was thought that the 
bids might be opened on the 1st of May. Later on it was discovered 
that that would not give the contractors time enough, and of our 
own vohtion we postponed bids until May 15. That was not done 
officially; that was a matter of discretion between the International 
Mercantile Marine Co. and ourselves. 

The Chairman. On or about October 21, you wrot« a letter tt 
the chairman of the board that you expected to have bids for this 
oil fuel installation within, or at least that you expected to be able 
to get them within a week or 10 days. Hx)w were you proc>eeding 
at that time ? 

Mr. Hague. At that time we had intended to send out formal 
specifications for the conversion of the bunkers to carrying oil. After 
tnat letter was written there was called to our attention the fact 
that our scheme for proceeding with oil installation was in direct 
violation of the law or regulations and consequently we abandoned 
that scheme. 

The Chairman. I think that is all unless some other member of 
the committee wishes to ask further questions. [After a pause.] 
Mr. Hague, 1 believe we are through with you; and we thank you. 

Mr. Franklin, we will now hear you. 

TESTIMONT OF HB. P. A. S. FBAHKLIir— Resumed. 

The Chairman. Mr. Franklin, you were asked on yesterday when 

Jou first knew that you were to have, or that your concern, the 
atemational Mercantile Marine Co., was to have the contract from 
the Shipping Board for reconditioning the Leviatharij and you stated 
that you preferred not to testify definitely until you consulted yom* 
correspondence. Have you consulted your correspondence ? 

Mr. Franklin. I have consulted the correspondence — ^not thor- 
oughly and completely, Mr. Chairman, but just hastily — and I find 
that on November 14 we received a letter advising us: '* We hereby 
assign to you for management and operation. Shipping Board account, 
the steamship Leviailian.^^ That was of the date November 14, and 
was signed by Mr. Goodman, for assistant director of operations. 
United States Shipping Board. As I stated on yesterday, there was 
a great deal of correspondence along through that time and I was 
not sure of the date, but this shows clearly the date when the ship 
was assigned to us. 

The (Slairman. So that when you sent out this invitation and 
were having those conferences the ship had actually been assigned to 
you for operation ? 

Mr. Franklin. For management and operation. 

The Chairman. It has been assigned to you for management and 
operation ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

The Chairb£a.n. But the contract which you signed on December 
17 had not been put in writing, as I understand ? 

Mr. Franklin. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Were negotiations under way for that contract at 
the time this assignment was made of the ship to you for management 
and operation } 

Mr. Franklin. Negotiations followed right after that and con- 
tinued until the agreement was finally gotten into mutually satis- 

*tory form. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1413 

'Rie Chairman. From whom was that letter that vou have referred 
to» 

Mr. FRANKI.IN. This letter was signed by E. Goodman, for assistant 
director of operations, Shipping Board. 

The Cblairman. Who was the assistant director of operations, do 
you know ? 

Mr. Franklin. I would not like to say as of that time; they have 
changed. 

The Chairman. Do vou know who E. Goodman was ? 

Mr. Franklin. No; I do not know E. Goodman. 

The Chairman. Do you know wehther the party was a man or a 
woman ? 

Mr. Franklin. I should not like to say whether it was a man or a 
woman. 

The Chairman. Do you know what title E. Goodman had, whether 
secretary of the assistant director of operations, or what ? 

Mr. Franklin. He signs "E. Goodman, for assistant director of 
operations. " It does not say secretary or what he is. 

The Chairman. That is the only document you have been able to 
find thus far upon which you proceeded thereafter to work ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. No doubt there were other documents, but 
this was the first notice we received. Immediately after that we 
continued negotiations. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Steele ? 

Mr. Steele. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Kelley ? 

Mr. Kelley. Were there any other operators who desired the 
assignment of the Leviathan to them ? 

Mr. Franklin. Not that I heard of, but I might not know of that. 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. Steele asked Mr. Hague about the New York 
Shipbuilding Co. Our interest in the New York Shipbuilding Co. is 
shown on a chart which we filed on yesterday morning. 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Hadley called my attention to that after I asked 
my questions. That testimony was brought out on yesterday before 
I arrived. 

Mr. Franklin. They were never interested in the work. They 
announced in the first place that they did not want to bid. 

Mr. Kelley. Did you take the Leviathan on the same general terms 
as the other assignedf ships, or is it a special arrangement? 

Mr. Franklin. I think it will have to be a special arrapgement, 
because I do not think any terms have ever been successfully drawn 
ijp to govern the operation of large passenger ships. 

Mr. Kelley. You mean that the matter is open still 1 

Mr. Franklin. The matter is entirely open. As to the terms and 
conditions, they are entirely open. 

Mr. Kelley. It might turn out that you would not want to operate 
the ship ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes. If you will notice the last paragraph in the 
agreement, it is to the effect that we must reach a satisfactory man- 
agement and operating agreement. 

I am very much obliged to you, gentlemen of the committee, unless 
there is something more ? 

The Chairman. I think not. Is Mr. Brogan here? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You will please come around and be sworn. 



1414 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

TESTIMOHT OF MS. THOMAS A. BBOOAH, AUDITOR OF U- 
PAIBS. XnnTED STATES SHIPPIlfO BOABD EMERGEITCY 
FLEET COEPOBATIOV, 90. 45 BEOADWAT» VEW TOBK CITT. 

(The witness was dulv sworn by the chairman.) 

The Chairman. Mr. ferogan, wnat is your namel 

Mr. Brogax. Thomas A. Brogan. 

The Chairman. What position do you occupy with the Emerge vy 
Fleet Corporation or the United States Shippmg Board? 

Mr. Brogan. Auditor of repairs. 

The Chairman. Where are you located ? 

Mr. Brogan. No. 45 Broadway. 

The Chairman. How long have you bet^n with the Fleet Corpora- 
tion or the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Brogan. Since the creation of the Board of Survey and Co :i- 
sulting Engineers, in 1917? 

The Chairman. Have you been stationed right here ever since? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What are your duties? 

Mr. Brogan. The audit of all repair bills. 

The Chairman. You audit all repair bills? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

The CiLViRMAN. Have any bills of the steamship Lnnothan passed 
through your office and u^ider your inspection ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you able to state how much has been expended 
on the steamship LevniJuin siiice it has been turned over to the 
Shippirg Board ? 

Mr. Brogan. We have already placed in line for paj^ment or 
voucher about S2 17,000. 

The Chairman. What does that include? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, it includes everything. It includes service for 
laintenance, repairs, and ar^ythirg — everything in general. 

The CiLviRMAN. How much of that has been paid to the agent? 

Mr. Brogan. How much ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Brogan. Well, the only thing paid to the agent is the agency 
fee of $15,000 per month. 1 believe they have been about three 
months' fees, about $45,000. 

The Chairman. You mean that all that has been paid to the agent 
direct is its fee ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. It is nearly five months now, isn't it? When did 
the payments stop ? 

Mr. 'Brogan. January. 

The Chairman. The 17th of January ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much has been paid for repair work ? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, I could not say offhand. I would have to 
examine the records first. 

The Chairman. You can not tell how much of that has been 
spent on repair work ? 
Mr. Brogan. By examination of the records; yes. 

The Chairman. How much of an examination would that require? 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1415 

Mr. Brogan. Well* I would have to look at the books. I mean 
that I have not the figures in my mind. 

The Chairman. How long would it take ? 

Mr. Brogan. To ascertain that? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Brogan. Oh, about half an hour or a few minutes. 

The Chairman. Do you know how much money, if any, has been 
spent on the ground of wharfage ? 

Mr. Brogan. Nothing to my mind. 

The Chairman. They are not paying the War Department for 
the use of that dock over there ? 

Mr. Brogan. We have not been presented with invoices yet for it. 

The Chairman. Have there been any payments made on account 
of repair work to the I. M. M. ? 

Mr. Brogan. For repair work ? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Brogan. Well, I would not say so. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether there has been or not ? 

Mr. Brogan. The only repair work that would be paid to the 
I. M. M. would be for the crew remaining on board. Their wages 
may be continued while they are doing repair work; but in connection 
with the payment of the crew^s invoices, we do not handle that; we 
han<lle everything except the wages of the crew. 

The Chairman. Do you pay the wages of the crew ? 

Mr. Brogan. No, sir; the disbursing officer of the Treasury Depart- 
ment pays the crew. Mr. McCann pays them. With the exception 
of the crew's payroll, we pav everytliing else. 

The Chairman. Is that a Shipping Board crew ? 

Mr. Brogan. It is the Leviathan crew. 

The Chairman. Who employs them ? 

Mr. Brogan. The I. M. M., under the terms, I believe, of the 
operator's agreement for management and operation. 

The Chairman. How is it that these expenses do not pass through 
your hands ? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, we have never had that. This accoimting 
arrangement is such that the crew's wages have never passed through 
our department. We just handle repairs. 

The Chairman. You say up to date $217,000 have been expended 
including the agent's fee ? 

Mr. Brogan. About up to May 1. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Kelley. 

Mr. Kelley. The agent's fee of $15,000 a month is exclusive of 
what services may be rendered by the employees of the agent, is it 
not? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. How much have you paid the employees of the 
International Mercantile Marine Co. ? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, I would have to consult the records on that, 
but I imagine about $19,000 or $20,000. 

Mr. Kelley. Altogether? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Would Mr. Gibbs be carried on your payroll ? 

Mr. Brogan. No, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Would not he receive any pay per month at all for 
his work in connection with the ship ? 



1416 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 

Mr. Brooan. No, sir. The contract calls for the contributn« 
of the services of Mr. Gibbs. 

Mr. Kelley. It exempts him from pay ? 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kellet. But if he had to have other engineering help to 
assist him they would be paid by the Shipping Board ? 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. The contract empowers them to employ 
any additional help necessary. 

Mr. Kelley. AD the regular force of the International Mercantile 
Marine Co., or of their re^ar force. Are there any others carried 
on the pay roll beside those you have named ? 

Mr. Brooan. Of the regular force ? 

Mr. Kelley. Yes. 

Mr. Brooan. Outside of an executive engineer, I believe that is 
the only one. Mr. Galloway I believe is that one. 

Mr. Kelley. You have never inquired particularly into the 
personnel of the nay roll to see whether or not there were others? 

Mr. Brooan. Oh, yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. That were regular employees of the International 
Mercantile Marine Co. ? 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir; they furnish us the pay roll and we look 
into that before it is vouchered. 

Mr. Kelley. When you say you looked into it, what do you 
mean? 

Mr, Brooan. Well, they furnish us with a copy of the pay roll, 
and of course it is supposed to be used to make up the voucher. 
We have a resident auditor who looks up all matters thoroughly. 

Mr. Kelley. Is there any limitation on their expenditures ? 

Mr. Brooan. I should say not. 

Mr. Kelley. That is, they can put anybody on the pay roll that 
they think necessary for the work, and you would pay that expense 
witnout question ? 

Mr. Brooan. Well, I would not pay it without question. 

Mr. Kelley. What I mean is, you would not question their 
authority to do it ? 

Mr. Brooan. We would not question their authoritv, but we 
might question the advisability of having too much help. The 
contract empowers them to employ whatever help they may deem 
necessary. 

Mr. Kelley. If they should think it was necessary and you did 
not think it was necessary, what about that ? 

Mr. Brooan. We would refer the matter to Mr. Hague. 

Mr. Kelley. And Mr. Hague would determine it ? 

Mr. Brooan. He is the agent of the owner. 

Mr. Kelley. Does the contract say they may employ whatever 
help they may deem necessary ? 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Then I shoidd not think there would be much chance 
for a controversy on that, would you ? 

Mr. Brooan. Well 

Mr. Kelley. As a matter of fact, the provision, whatever it is, 
has not been in any way abused ? 

Mr. Brooan. No, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. They have only had what help was necessary to 
carry on the work ? 

Mx. Brooan. Yes, sir. 



SHIPPIKG BOABD OFEBATIOKS. 14l7 

Mr. KELLEhr. You had an engineering force that was employed on 
the specifications and that was paid for by the Shipping Board; as I 
iindeTBtand f - 

Mr. Brooan. We have not been presented with any invoices for 
the preparation of the specifications. 

Mr. Kbllet. I know, but there must have been a number of 
engineers survejdng the ship and getting the necessary data. 

Mr. Brooan. Yes. sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Ana you have paid them ? 

Mr. Bbooan. Not as yet; no, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. Do you mean that there are some outstanding bills 
for that work yet ? 

Mr. Bboqan. Our method of accounting calls for any contractual 
bills to be made by requisition. In other words, before they author- 
ize an expenditure they must make a requisition for that expenditure 
and we are furnished with a copy of the requisition. To my mind I 
do not believe there have been any requisitions issued of that particu* 
lar kind, or for that particular account. 

Mr. Kelley. You ao not know whether that work has all been done 
by engineers authorized or furnished by the various shipbuilding and 
repair companies as a matter of patriotism and donation, do you? 

Mr. Brogan. I could not say. 

Mr. EIelley. How many people are on the pay roll now on the con- 
struction and engineering end ? 

Mr. Brooan. About 15. 

Mr. Kelley. How many of , those 15 are regular employees of the 
Tnteroational Mercantile Marine Co. ? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, I should say about three. 

Mr. Kelley. And the others have been added from the outside ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. That would include the chief steward, the 
steward who was assigned by the I. M. M.; a resident engineer or 
executive engineer, and the engineer of the ship. 

Mr. Kelley, When the work begins on the ship I suppose there 
wiD be large expenditures for expert supervision? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, that would be a question as to whether they 
would be entitled to expert supervision imder the agency fee. 

Mr. Kelley. Take tne question of decorations of a very difficult 
character. A man to inspect that kind of work would be a pretty 
high-paid person, I suppose, so that the cost of inspection will be 
large, and that force will have to be gotten together. There are no 
inspectors on the pay roll as yet ? 

Mr. Brogan. No, sir. 

Mr. Kelley. That is all I wish to ask. 

The Chairman. Mr. Steele, do you. wish to ask any questions? 

Mr. Steele. You stated a moment ago that a requisition was 
usually made before an expenditure was authorized. 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. What is the system with reference to those requisi- 
tions 1 

Mr. Brogan. The requisition emanates from Mr. Gibbs's office, the 
chief of the construction department of the I. M. M. It must bear 
his approval before it goes to the vendor. 

Mr. Steele, is that requisition necessary in all cases before expend- 
itures can be made by the T. M. M. ? 

177068— 20— FT 4 12 



1418 SHIPPIHO BOARD OPBBATIONS. 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir; we will not pass an invoice unless we have & 
supporting requisition. 

Mr. Steele. In that way are you able to check up all outstanding 
accounts ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Are there any outstanding accounts now ? 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. There are some outstanding accounts at this time! 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Steele. Do you know what the probable amount of them 
will be? 

Mr. Brooan. The estimated amount is about $40,000. 

Mr. Kelley. That is in addition to the $217,000 you spoke of 
awhile ago ? 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CoNNALLY. A moment ago the chairman asked you about the 
authority of the agent to employ additional help, and asked you as 
to whether Mr. Gibbs was on tnat pay roll or not. You said that they 
had authority to employ persons and that you paid them. TVefl, 
now, when you pay tnem do you or not determine as to whether or 
not they were engaged in service on the Leviathan, or do you just say 
they had authority to employ them and stop there and go ahead and 
pay them ? 

Mr. Brooan. Oh, no. 

Mr. Connally. Does your resident auditor, as you call him, verify 
the fact that whoever those parties are have performed work 1 

Mr. Brooan. Surely. 

Mr. Connelly. That is what I was getting at. 

Mr. Brooan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Connally. I assumed that you would surely do that, but 
wanted it made clear upon the record 1 

Mr. Brogan. Yes. sir. 

Mr. C!oNNALLY. Tnat is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Hadley ? 

Mr. Hadley. About requisitions: In the case of work for which a 
requisition would be presented to you, is it the practice that no work 
is performed before a requisition is made ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. So that under that system, if followed, there could 
not be any accrued accounts which have not appeared before you in 
the form of requisitions ? 

Mr. Brogan. Well, take a case where the invoice would not be 
rendered: The requisition would have been issued, but \i the vendor 
was slow in rendering its invoice the amount of the invoice would 
not be ascertained until it would be 

Mr. Hadley (interposing). The point I meant to make by the 
question was : If I understand yoiu* system there would be no expendi- 
ture for labor until a requisition was issued ? 

Mr. Brogan. That is right. 

Mr. Hadley. And you would know if labor was being expended 
because it would be antedated by a requisition ? 

Mr. Brogan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. That is all. 

The Chairman. I think that is all we wish to ask you at this time. 
Mr. Brogan. I thank you. 



SHIPPING BOABD 0PERATI017S. 1419 

(And the witness was excused.) 

Mr. KiauLEY. I would like to ask Mr. Franklin another question. 

The Chaibikan. Mr. Frankliu, will you take the stand again ? 

TESTSHOHT OF MB. P. A. S. FSAJTKLIH — ^Resnmed. 

Mr. Kktj.ey. Mr. Franklin, I would like to ask you whether or not 
any operator would operate this ship by itself ? That is, if he was not 
engaged in business in an extensive way, could any operator take the 
ship and run it by itself ? 

Mr. Franklin. It would be a very expensive and extravagant 
thing to do, because you would have to have a large passenger 
organization to properly handle the business of the steamer; and to 
have such an organization, and to have that steamer only, it would be 
an exceedingly extravagant and expensive operation. 

Mr. KFJ.T.EY. So that when it comes right down to the proposition, 
your company is practically the only company in the United States 
that has the organization and the business to warrant taking this 
steamer on. 

Mr. Franklin. I do not think anybody else has an organization 
that will anything like duplicate ours. We have our own salaried 
officers in almost all important centers in the United States. 

Mr. Kellby. If you aid not take this steamer on where would she 
be assimed ? 
Mr. Franklin. I would not like to guess on that. 
Ifr. Kelley. Do you think that there is anybody else who would 
take her ? 
Mr. Franklin. That I could not tell you. 
Mr. Kelley. Under our flag, I mean. 
Mr. Franklin. As I say, I could not teU you that. 
Mr. Kelley. I know you could not tell, and probably you would 
not teU, but I would like to get an idea of the situation : Y ou do not 
know of anybody else who would take her, do you ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I would not like to say as to that. I think 
I know a good many people who might be willinff to take her, but the 
question is whether they are properly equippea to do the business; 
and that is an entirely different matter. This ship requires a great 
deal of background in the way of agencies and proper people to 
handle the business in every direction, and as far as the I. M. M. is 
concerned, they have their own passenger offices all along the eastern 
coast, and in Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis, St. Paul, St. Louis, and 
in Seattle and San Francisco on the west coast, and we are opening 
other offices in other places — ^New^ Orleans, Galveston, and principal 
places. And they are our own salaried passenger offices and not 
agencies, and they are not working for anybody else. 

Mr. Kjelley. As a business proposition, if this steamer were not 
available I presume that your concern would not think of building 
one like her 1 

Mr. Franklin. You would not think of building one like her 
^^ay. You would have thought of it, and we were thinking of it 
vearv seriously prior to the war. But the cost of construction of 
s^ch a ship to-day makes it prohibitory, and I know of no place 
^here one is being built to-day; I know of no place in the world. 






1420 SHIPPIKG BOARD OPERATIOK8. 

Mr. KjiLLEY. On what capitalization could this ship be suc^asfollj 
operated ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, I should say on about $15,000,000, or along 
through there. Of course, the moment you get into these figures yew 
must take into consideration that for a private firm to take on the 
steamer is a very serious matter, for the reason that she could Dot 
be insured to-day. 

Mr. Kelley. vVTw not ? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, there is no way, or I do not think there is 
any way, in which you could get $15,000,000 in insurance on any 
one ship to-day. 

Mr. Kelley. Even though you would split up the pobcy t 

Mr. Franklin. We could not insure our big ships completely 
before the war, and the values were much less then. 

Mr. Kjjlley. Is that due to any experience in the loss of some 
large ships heretofore ? 

Mr. Franklin. Noj it is a question of the lines which each com- 
pany and each individual when it gets into the Lloyd situation is 
willing to take on one ship. That is expanding and will expand bs 
the financial situation expands. 

Mr. Blelley. I have not followed very closely the Government 
operation of anv of these ships, but is the Government operating any 
passenger lines i 

Mr. Franklin. The Government has started a passenger service 
to South America, and they have had one or two passenger steamers 
here and there — one to the Black Sea, and so on. But the South 
American is the only passenger service they have really started. 

Mr. BlELLEy. Really, I suppose, outside of your firm the Govern- 
ment is about the omj unit tnat would be warranted in operating a 
ship of this value and expense. As an experiment the Government 
might undertake it. 

Mr. Franklin. Well, as an experiment, having the steamer and 
being fairly confident that the steamer can be satisfactorily operated. 

Mr. Kjjlley. The Government, I suppose, might operate it be- 
tween this point and South America or Southampton. 

Mr. Franklin. The best route would be from rfew York to Cher- 
bourg and Southampton, and on the return trip, Southampton to 
Cherbourg and New York. 

Mr. Kelley. This ship can not get into Liverpool? 

Mr. Franklin. Well, she has been in Liverpool and she can get 
into Liverpool. But it is a doubtfid proposition, and I believe there 
is only one dock she can get into there. And she can only get into 
that on a certain stage of the tide. Liverpool is not suitable as a 
port for a ship of this size. She was anchored in the river the most 
of the time there. 

Mr. Kelley. Really the Government is obliged to do one of two 
things: Operate this ship itself or make some satisfactory arrango- 
ment, practically with your company ? 

Mr. Franklin. I do not like to narrow it down to that entirely 
myself, but I believe that statement is fundamentally sound, i 
believe we can render better service to the Government in connection 
with this ship than anybody else; and I believe we can handle the 
ship more advantageously for the Government than the Government 
can handle it or anybody else can do it. 



SHIPPING BOAltD OPERATIONS. 1421 

Mr. Steele. Mr. Franklin, I understand a provision has been 
inserted in the sundry civil appropriation bill now pending in the 
House of Kepresentatives for the immediate sale of Government 
ships, including the Leviathan. Would this be an advantageous time 
for the sale of the Leviathan by the Government ? 
Mr. Franklin. I would say for the Leviathany no. 
Mr. Steels. Whv ? 

Mr. Franklin. The financial situation at the moment is such that 
the amount of capital re(]|uired to recondition this ship makes it a 
doubtful proposition at this particular time. 
Mr. Steele. Is that likely to be corrected in the near future ? 
Mr. Franklin. Well, I think it will improve. I think the situation 
will improve. 
Mr. Steele. But it is hard to forecast any definite time. 
Mr. Franklin. Yes; and because of the tremendous expense 
required in reconditioning this ship I doubt if anybody would buy 
her. That is my point. As to the other ships, it is dinerent; as to 
all other ships it is different. But for private capital to face recon- 
ditioning the Leviathan at this time is a very doubtful undertaking. 
Mr. Steele. I have no further questions. 

The Chairman. Mr. Hadley, do you wish to ask anjr questions ? 
Mr. Hadley. Mr. Franklin, you expressed the opinion on yester- 
day that it would be advisable, I believe you said, for the Govern- 
TDimi to retain title to the Leviathan ? 

Mr. Franklin. That has been my feeling, in the case of the 
LmaOian only. 
Mr. Hadlet. I am speaking of the Leoia^ha/n. 
Mr. Franklin. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hadley. Do you think from the experience the Government 
has had in the operation of vessels in passenger service that it can 
operate and maintain a vessel of this character as successfully as 
your o^anization could do it % 

Mr. Franklin. The Government can employ us to do it and have 
it as well done for the Government as we woula do it for ourselves. 

Mr. Hadley. I was not asking with a view to the Government 
chartering it or doing it on any other arrangement than direct opera- 
tion. What would DC necessary for the Government to do if it 
operated it itself ? 

Mr. Franklin. WeU, I think it would be very unwise and very 
^pensive for the Government to undertake to operate the steamer 
itself. The Government would have to establish a very large pas- 
senger and operating organization. 

Mr. Hadley. I apprehended that and that was the reason I asked 
the question, to ascertain if that was your opinion. 
Mr. Franklin. That is my opinion. 

Mr. Hadley. In other words, if the Government did retain title 
to the Leviathan y the only feasible thing for it to do, in your judgment, 
Would be to arrange for its operation through some agency or repre- 
sentative % 
Mr. Franklin. That is my opinion. 

Mr. Hadley. In all probability, then, they would charter it on 
^tae basis ? 

Mr. Franklin. Or I should say that better than chartering it they 
Would make an arrangement whereby they, having put money into 



1422 SHIPPIK6 60ABD OPERATIONS. 

the steamer, would get all the profit the ship makes, barring a proper 
compensation to the managing agent. They are entitled to all the 
profit and they ought to have all the profit. 

Mr. Kellet. And would likewise suffer all the losses. 

Mr. Franklin. You can not get the one without the other. 

Mr. Hadley. With such information as you have concerning this 
vessel, and considering the present and probable- future conditions 
surrounding its operation, do you think that it would be a profitable 
enterprise for the Government if it embarked upon that enterprise! 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; I think the Government would make money 
out of this steamer. Now, the difficulty is whether they will get 
their capital back, I believe they will over a period of years. 

Mr. ELadley. Speaking of capital, the capital investment must be 
taken into account. I assumed by my question that you were 
taking the investment into account m the matter of profit. 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; I am taking into account, we will say for the 
sake of discussion, that you will charge up 10 per cent per annum 
depreciation. 

Mr. Hadley. I believe that is all. 

Mr. Franklin. I think the best reply to that, further, is that we 
bid for the vessel, and we estimated our cost of reconditioning and 
yot made a bid for it. 

Mr. Hadley. But if I understood you in your earlier testimony 
soinowhore you indicated that you would not bid again what you 
bid before? 

Mr. Franklin. Not just now. 

Mr. Hadley. And that the Government had a better offer then 
than it could ever expect to get again. 

Mr. Franklin. I think that is true. 

Mr. Hadley. What was your estimated cost of reconditioning the 
lieviathan when you took that into account? 

Mr. Fbanklin. We estimated $7,600,000, is my recollection. 

Mr. Hadley. And you offered $3,500,000 for the vessel ? 

Mr. Franklin. Yes; $3,500,000 in one bid, and $4,000,000 in 
another. 

Mr. Hadley. In the Leviathan bid, estimating your cost of recon- 
ditioning at $7,500,000, and taking into consideration your offer of 
$3,500,000, you figured on an investment of $11,000,000? 

Mr. Franklin. About 811,000,000. 

Mr. Hadley. That is all. 

The Chairman. There seems to be no further questions, Mr. 
Franklin. We thank you. 

(And the witness was excused.) 

The Chairman. Before proceeding with the next matter before 
the committee, namely, an inquiry into the affairs of the Charles W. 
Morse interests, the committee will hold a short executive session. 
I think we can retire into room 806 for a few moments. 

(Thereupon, at 10.50 o'clock a. m., the committee went into 
executive session in room 806, No. 45 Broadway, offices of the United 
States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, and remained 
in executive session until 11.05 o'clock a. m., when the committee 
returned to the public hearing room, No. 804, where it resumed its 
open sessions on the subject of the Morse interests, which will be 
found in a separate volume.) 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1423 

EXHIBITS. 

The following are exhibits introduced in evidence at the New- 
York hearings in connection with the S. S. Leviathan: 

Exhibit P. A. S. Franklin No. 1. 

AMENDED CERTIFICATE OP ORGANIZATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL MERCANTILE 
MARINE COMPANY, UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE OP NEW JERSEY. 

Know all men by tHese presents, that we, Clement A. Griscom, William Henry 
Barnes, Alexander J. Cassatt, Henry H. Houston, and Joseph D. Potts, of the city of 
Philadelphia, State of Pennsylvania; Benjamin Brewster, of the city of New York, 
in the State of New York, and William J. Sewell, of the city of Camden, and the State 
of New Jersey, do hereby associate ourselves into a company under and by virtue of 
the pro\-ision8 of the act of the Legislature of the State of New Jersey, entitled "An 
act concerning corporations," approved April 7, A. D. 1875, and the several acts 
amendatory thereof and supplementary thereto, for the purposes hereinafter men- 
tioned, and we do hereby and to that end make, acknowledge, and file this certifi- 
cate, and we do hereby certify and set forth: 

First. That the name assumed for designating the company and to be used in its 
business and dealings is "International Mercantile Marine Company.'* 

Second. That the place in this State where the principal part of the business of such 
company within this State is to be conducted and transacted is Jersey City, in the 
county of Hudson; and the States and countries out of this State where the company 
proposes to carry on portions of its business and transactions are the States of New 
York and Pennsylvania, and all the other States and Territories of the United States, 
^nd the countries of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and all the 
countries of Europe, and such other places and countries as the business of the com- 
pany may recjuire; that the objects for which this company is formed are the trans- 
portation for hire of passengers and mails, goods, wares, merchandise, animals, and 
other prop>erty and materials of all kinds and nature whatsoever, to, from, and be- 
tween the various cities, towns, and jjorts of the world, by means of steam or sailing 
vessels; the purchase, owning, chartering, and employment of steam and other vessels, 
and the purchase, owning, and holding of shares or portions of such steam or other 
vessels, and of the stock, bonds, and other securities of corporations of this and other 
States and countries; to purrhasp, lease, acquire, and hold such real estate, buildings, 
warehouses, wharv^es, piers, and easements situate either in the United States or 
abroad, as may be advantageous for carrying on its business; to acquire, hold, and 
employ such lighters, steam tugs, and shares of incorporated companies owning the 
same, as may be necessary in the said business, in the ports of the United States and 
in foreign ports; to enter into and carry out contracts of every sort and kind with 
any person, firm, association, company, corporation, private, public, and municipal, 
or body politic, and with the United States Government or any State, Territory, or 
dependency thereof, or with any foreign government or state, or any department or 
officer or agent thereof, including the power to sell, let, or hire any of its steamers or 
sailing vessels or other property to such Government or State, or for its use, for any 
purpose or object whatever, naval, military, or other, upon such terms or conditions 
and for such time as the company may think fit; to issue bonds or other evidences 
of indebtedness; to mortgage the corporate franchises, the real and personal property 
o! the company, the ^'essels and steamships owned by it, the incomes and profits 
accruing to it and the stock, bonds, and other securities of other corporations or com- 
panies owned by it, to secure the payment of any or all of its bonds or other evidences 
of indebtedness', in whole or in part, bv such mortgage or mortgages, and to sell and 
dispose of any property, real or personal, acquired by the said company. 

The portion of the business of the company which is to be carried on out of this 
State is the transaction of a general transportation business, in the carrying for hire of 
P^^BBengers and mails, goods, wares, merchandise, animals and other property and 
Materials of all kinds and nature whatsoever, upon steamships and other vessels to, 
nom and between the various ports of the world, particularly between the ports of 
New York and Philadelphia and the ports of Southampton, liverpool, Antwerp and 
other ports of £uiope, and the jprocunng of contracts for, and the malan^ of contract 
toT the employment and freighting of the same^ and to carry on all the busmess, and to 
P*>*e88 and exercise any and all of the rights, powers and privileges above specified. 

The objects and powers specified in this article shall, except where otherwise ex- 
pressed in said article, be no wise limited or restricted by reference to or inference 



1424 



SHIPPING BOABD OPBRATIOHS. 



from the terms of any other clauiie or panmph herein, but shall be deemed each to be 
separate objects or powers, and that said objects or powers shall be deemed to be in 
furtherance of and not in limitation of the general powers conferred by the lavs of the 
State of New Jersey. 

Third. That the company may have offices or agencies in the United States and in 
foreign countries. 

Fourth. That the amoimt of the total authorized capital stock of the compsny is 
one hundred and twenty million dollars ($120,000,000), divided into one million, tvo 
hundred thousand (1,200,000) shares of the par value of one hundred doHars ($100) 
each, of which six hundred thousand (600,000) shares shall be preferred stock and fix 
bundled thousand (600,000) shares shall be common stock. 

The holders of the preferred stock shall be entitled to receive, when and as declared, 
from the surplus or net profits of the company, yearly dividends at the rate of six per 
centum per annum, ana no more, pavable semiannually on dates to be fixed by the 
by-laws. The dividends on the preferred stock shall oe cumulative, and shiul be 
payable before any dividend on the common stock shall be paid or set apart; so that, if 
in any year, dividends amounting to six per centum shall not have been paid thereoD* 
the denciency shall be payable before any dividends shall be paid upon or set apoit 
for the conmion stock. 

Whenever all cimiulative dividends on the preferred stock for all previous yesn 
shall have been declared and shall have become payable, and the accrued s^aiiannnal 
installment for the current year shall have been declared, and the company shall have 
paid such cumulative dividends for previous years and such accrued semiannual 
installments, or shall have set aside from its surplus or net profits a simi sufficient for 
the payment thereof, the board of directors mav declare dividends on the common 
stock, payable then or thereafter, out of any remaining surplus or net profits; pro\idea. 
however, that the dividends upon the common stock shall be so limited that the same 
shall never in any one year exceed the rate of ten per centum so long a^ there shall 
remain outstanding and unredeemed any of the four and one-half per cent, mortgage 
and collateral trust gold bonds of the company. 

In the event of any liquidation or dissolution or winding up (whether voluntary or 
involuntary) of the company, the holders of the preferred stocx shall be entitled to be 
paid in full both the par amount of their shares and the unpaid dividends accrued 
thereon before any amount shall be paid to the holders of the common stock; but after 
the payment of the holders of the preferred stock of its par value and the unpaid 
accrued dividends thereon the remaining assets and funds shall be divided and paid 
to the holders of the common stock according to their respective shares. 

The amount with which the company will commence business is seven thousand 
dollars, which is divided into seventy shares of one himdred dollars each of common 
stock. 

Fifth. That the names and residences of the stockholders and the number of shares 
held by each are as follows: 



Name. 



Clement A. Griscom . . . 
wmiam Hemy Barnes. 
Alexander J. Cassatt . . . 

Henry H. Houston 

Joseph D. Potts 

Beniamin Brewster 

Wmiam J. SeweU 



Resldenoe. 



Philadelphia, Pa 

do 

do 

do 

do 

NewYorkCity, N. Y. 
Camden, N. J 



ShareB* 



10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



Sixth. The duration of the company shall be perpetual. 

Seventh. The number of the directors of the company shall be 16. The directors 
shall be classified with respect to the time for which they shall severally hold office, 
by dividing them into three classes, the first class consisting of five directors, the 
second class consisting of five directors, and the third class consisting of six directore. 
The directors of the first class shall be elected for a term of one year; the directors of 
the second class for a term of two years; and the directors of the third class for a tern 
of tliree years; and at each annual election the successors to the class of directotB 
whose term shall expire in thatvear shall be elected to hold office for the term of 
three years, so that the term of ofnce of one class of directors shall expire in each year. 
In case of any vacancy among the directors of any class, through death, resignation, 
disqualification, or other cause, the remaining directors, by the affirmative vote of a 
majority of the whole board of directors may elect a successor director or directors, 



H 



SHIPPIKG BOABD OPERATIONS. 1425 

to hold office for the unexpired portion of the term of the director or directors whoee 
office shall become vacant and until the election of a successor or successors. 

The board of directors shall have power to hold their meetini^ outside of the State 
of New Jersey, at such places as from time to time my be designated by the by-laws 
or b^ reeolu&ns of the beard of directors. The by-laws may prescribe the number 
of du'ectors necessary to constitute a quorum of the board of directors, which number 
mav be leas than a majority of the whole number of directors. 

OnlesB autiiorized by votes given in person or by proxy b^r stockholders holding at 
least two-thirds of the capital stock of the company, which is represented and voted 
upon in person or by proxy at a meetine specially called for that purpose or at an 
annual meeting, the board of directors shall not mortgage or pledge any property of 
the comjMiny or any shares of the capital stock of any other corporation owned by it; 
but this prohibition shall not be construed to apply to the execution of any purchase- 
money mort^:age or any other purchase-money lien. 

As Authorized by tne act of the legislature of the State of New Jersey, passed 
March 22, 1901, amending: the seventeenth section of ''An Act Concerning Corporar 
tions (Revision of 1896), any action which theretofore required the consent oi the 
holders of two- thirds of the stock at any meeting after notice to them given, or required 
their consent in writing to be filled, may be taken upon the consent of, and the consent 
given and filed by the holders of two-thirds df the stock of each class represented at 
such meeting in person or by proxy. 

Any officer elected or appointed' by the board of directors may be removed at any 
time by the affirmative vote of a majority of the whole board of directors. Any other 
officer or employee of the company may be removed at any time by vote of the board 
of directors or by any committee or superior officer upon whom such power of removal 
may be conferred by the by-laws or by a vote of the board of directors. 

The board of directors, by the affirmative vote of a majority of the whole board, may 
appoint from the directors such committees as they may deem judicious, and, to sucn 
extent as shall be provided in the by-laws, may delegate to such committees all or 
any of the powers of the board of directors, including the power to cause the seal of 
the company to be affixed to all papers that may require the same; and such conmiittees 
shall have, and thereupon may exercise, all or any of the powers so delegated to them. 
The board of directors may appoint not only ouier officers of the company, but also 
one or more vice presidents, one or more assistant treasurers and one or more assistant 
secretaries; and to the extent provided in the by-laws the persons so appointed re- 
spectively shall have and may exercise all the powers of the president, of the treasurer 
and of the secretary, respectively. 

The board of directors shall have power from time to time to fix and to determine 
and to vary tiie amount of the worxing capital of the company; and to direct and 
determine the use and disposition of any surplus or net profits over and above the 
capital stock paid in; and, in its discretion, Uie board of directors may use and apply 
any such surplus or accumulated profits in purchasing or acquiring its bonds or other 
obligations, or shares of its own capital stock:, to such extent and in such manner and 
upon such terms as the board of directors shall deem expedient. 

The board of directors fr^n time to time shall determine whether and to what 
extent, and at what times and places, and under what conditions and regulations, the 
accoimts and books of the company, or any of them, shall be open to the inspection 
of the stockholders, and no stockholder shall have any right to inspect any account 
or book or document of the company, except as conferred by statute or authorized 
by the board of directors or by a resolution of the stockholders. 

The board of directors may make by-laws, and from time to time may alter, amend, 
or repeal any of them; but any by-law made by the board of directors ma>y be altered 
or repealed by the stochkolders at any annual meeting or at any special meeting, 
provided notice of such proposed alteration or repeal shall be included in the notice 
of euch meeting. 

In witness miereof, we have hereunto set our hands and seals this Slst day of May, 
1893. 
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of, as to all except W. J. Sewell. 

James B. Vredenburoh. Clement A. Griscom. [seal.] 

(As to William J. Sewell), W. H. Barnes, [seal.] 

A^. Q. Garrbtson. a. J. Cassatt. [seal.] 

H. H. Houston, [seal.] 
Jos. D. Potts, [seal.] 
Benj. Brewster, [seal.] 
W. J. Sewell. [seal.] 



1426 SHIPPINQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 

8TATEOP Pennsylvania, 

Cili/ and Count}/ of Philadrlphia, ti: 
Be it rempmbered. th&t on thu 31et day of May. 1893. before me. James B. Vreden- 
bureb, a maoter in chancBTy in the Slate of New Jency, pernonaillv appeared OemeDl 
A. Grisrom, William Uenry Bames, Alexander J. Casaatt, Henry It. Houston, tad 
Joaepb D. Pottfl, who I am Katicitied are five of the penmnR named in and who executed 
the loregoinf; certifirate of orKaniEatioD, and I baving firat made known to them the 
contents thereof, they did each acknowled)^ that they signed, waled, and deliveml 
the same aa their voluntary act and deed. Jambs B. Vhkdi:nbi7ruh, 

M. <\ C.o/JV. J. 



State op New York. 

City and County of New York, a: 
Beitremembered. thatonthislatdayof June, A.D. ISB3, before me, JamesB. Vredeo- 



Brcwster. who 1 am satiafied ia one of the peraons named in and who executed the 
(i)re^ning certificate of organization, and 1 having first made known to him the con- 
tents thereof, he did acknowledge that he signed, sealed, and delivered the same as 
hia voluntary act and deed. Jahbs B. V'RtiDBNBtmaH. 

M. C. C. 0/ N. J. 



SHIPPING BOAED OPEBATIONS. 1427 

State op New Jersey. 

County of Camden, ss: 

Be it remembered, thaton this 2d day of June, A. D-. 1893. before me, Abram 0. Garret- 
fv>n. a m<ifit«r in chancery of the State of New Jersey, person illy appeared William J. 

Kewell, who I am satisfied is one of the persons named in and vrhn executed the fore- 
^>in^ certificate of organization, and I having first made kn')wn to him the contents 
there'>f. ho did acknowledge that he signed, sealed, and delivered the sirae as his vol- 
untary act and deed. 

A. Q. Garrbtson, 
Master in Chancery of Nen' Jersey. 

R. L. Hague Exhibit A. 

** Specifications for reconditioning U. S. S. Lemathan and blue 
prints of the vessel." 

(This exhibit has been filed with the clerk of the committee and 
will not be reproduced.) 

R. L. Hague Exhibit B. 
S. S. "L€rwi^n."— Inventory Dec. 17, 1919. (Completed Mar. 1, 1920.) 

DECK DEPARTMENT. 

Qimntity. 

Acid, sulphuric, carboys 5 

Adze 1 

Amplifier, 2 strips, type SE, 1,000 amperes 1 

Anchor: 

lifeboat, sea 46 

Stock, motor boat 1 

Fire, complete 1 

Windlass 1 

Bow, 20,300 pounds 1 

Stern, 23,700 pounds 1 

Ax, fire 55 

Asdmuth: 

Circle in case. No. 1615 2 

Mirror, DRP, No. 247697 1 

Vane, W/0 circle 3 

Ax; 

Broad 1 

2-pound 1 

Bags, hammock 9 

Bag, oil, 1-quart 33 

Baskets, coal 11 

Barometer: 

Electric, German 1 

German 2 

Recorder 1 

Balls: 

Copper, toilet flusher 46 

For automatic plugs, lifeboat 10 

Bailer, lifeboat 10 

Bells, brass^ 24-inch, ship 3 

Bell, electnc, brass, 4-inch 1 

Benches, deck, 8-foot 12 

Bench, carpenter, 6 drawers, 2\ by 14^ inches 1 

Bench: 

Carpenter, with vise 2J by 6 inches 1 

Carpenter, with 11 drawers 2 feet by 28 inches 1 

Carpenter, with 3 drawers 2 by 8 feet 1 

Belt: 

life 3 

Lead weight for diving suit 3 



1428 SHIPPINQ BOA&D OPBRATIOVS. 

BinnacleB: Qnwaty. 

Boat, copper 2 

Boat, tin 1 

Boat, W/0 compaae « • 

Binoculan: 

No. 3561 1 

No. 2161 I 

No. 2166 1 

No. 3563 1 

No. 41599 1 

No. 2396 ^. 1 

No. 3569 1 

No. 2165 1 

No. 4339 1 

No. 2164 1 

No. 3570 1 

No. 3568 1 

No. 2169 1 

No. 3571 1 

• No. 116 1 

No number ; 1 

No . 2549 1 

O. D. glasB No. 3636 1 

O. D. glafis No. 3661 1 

O. D. glass No. 3664 1 

O. D. glass No. 3667 1 

Bits , assorted '. : 22 

Block: 

Wood, double. 6-inch 3 

Tail, 6-inch 1 

Iron, 4-inch, double 1 

Iron, 4-inch, triple ' 1 

Wood, single, 10-inch I 

Iron, single 11 

Snatch, 10-iuch 1 

And tackle, 6-inch, single 1 

And tackle, 3-inch, single 1 

And tackle, 6-inch, double 1 

12-inch, double 6 

12-inch, triple 1 

12-inch, iron, single 5 

Wood, 16-inch, with shackle, single 2 

GI, 16-inch, gin 1 

Iron, 10-inch, triple 1 

Cargo, 16-inch 1 

Carto, 9-inch 3 

GI, 9-inch, triple 1 

GI, 9-inch, double 2 

GI, snatch, 12-inch 2 

GI, cargo, 18-inch 7 

Fiddler, 12-inch, triple 2 

GI, lead, 10-inch : 17 

Single, wood, 14-inch 1 

GI, 5-inch 2 

Wood, 8-inch, double 6 

Wood, 10-inch, quadruple 2 

Wood, 14-inch, triple 2 

Wood, 10-inch, triple 2 

Wood, snatch, 8-inch 1 

Wood, 6-inch 5 

Steel, 8-inch, triple 2 

Fiddler, steel, 8-inch 2 

And tackle, 8-inch, double 1 

Gantling, wood 2 

And tackle, single 1 

GI, 24-inch, quadruple 4 



8HIPPIKG BOARD OPBRATIOKS. 1429 

Block— <3oDtinued. Quantity. 

GI, single, 8-inch 2 

GI , double, 8-inch 2 

GI, cargo, 10-inch 1 

Wood, snatch, 14-inch ' 3 

Blades: 

Saw, keyhole, 14-inch 1 

Hack-saw, 12-inch 72 

Bolts and nuts, assorted, pounds 25 

Bolts: 

Eye, GI , fr-inch 30 

Eye, GI, Hnch 24 

Eye, GI, f-inch 24 

Eye, iron, 2 by 3)-inches 26 

Stove, 2i by } inch, pound 1 

Bolts and nuts, A by i inch, pound 1 

Boat: 

Life, wood 43 

Life collapsible 27 

Motor, wood 2 

Board: 

Slack 1 

Bulletin 1 

Switch, electric 1 

Shuffle 24 

Serving 1 

Box, lamp, wall, tin, with glass front and sides 4) by 7 by 18 inches 58 

Boxes: 

Provision, lifeboat 23 

Emergency ration 4 

Blowertorch: 

Plumber 2 

Gasoline, 1 quart •. . 8 

Brass : .". 1 

Brushes: 

Deck 3 

Hair 4 

Paint, round 20 

Braces: 

Rachet 2 

Comer 1 

Brads: 

J-inch , pounds 2 

i-inch, pounds 2 

1-inch, pounds 2 

6d, poimds 2 

Brass, strap, pounds 10 

Buckets: 

GI 178 

Boat, wood 15 

Fire 35 

Pantry, white metal, with faucet, 5 gallonSr 2 

Buoye: 

Life, ring, Franklin standard 5 

Cork....! 5 

Brass, life 6 

Franklin type, life, brass 6 

Gaps: 

Brafls— 

1-inch 18 

2J-inch 3 

3finch 7 

Fire plug 6 

Galvanized iron, 2)-inch 1 

For J. G. W. Bercholtz's gun 24 

Cabinet, chart, 13 drawers, 7 by 4 feet 1 



1430 SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIOKS. 

Canvas: Quantity. 

14 by 6 feet piece.. 1 

Moot do 1 

No. 10, 22 -inch 5rards. . 2Hf> 

. Armv, duck, 8 ounces do 70 

No. 10, 30-inch do.... 200 

Army, 22-inch do 72 

Totton duck, No. 6, 22-inch do 101 

No. «, 22-inch do 200 

Anchor, sea R 

Blanket rells 12 

Cans, garbage, galvanized iri»n I 

Cable: 

Steel— 

t-inch coil . . 1 

-inch coil . . 1 

f-inch do I 

Subway, light do 4 

Wire— 

1-inch feet . . 100 

!-inch, 15 feet to each pan 5 

-inch, 20 feet to each pan 6 

J-inch, 50 feet to each pan 4 

^-inch, 12 feet to each pan 3 

i-inch, 25 feet to each pan • 3 

1-inch, 15 feet to each pan 11 

Galvanized iron — 

IJ-inch feet. . 120 

li-inch do 120 

Steel— 

] f-inch, 120 fathoms each ^ 

}-inch ^thorns. . 700 

Galvanized iron — 

■inch do I 

t-inch do 350 

Steel, l-inch, durable wire do 1 

Cases: 

Binocular 3 

Navigation 3 

Compass 1 

Cans: 
Oil- 
Brass, 1-pint 5 

Copper 11 

Brass, squirt — 

1-pint 2 

2-quart 2 

i-pint 2 

Calipers, 12-inch pairs. . 2 

Capstan, steam 9 

Cement: 

Portland pounds. . 600 

Rubber • pints. . 3 

Charges, for J. G. W. Bercholtz's gun 6 

Chain: 

Falls : I 

Boatswain 25 

Galvanized iron, }-inch, 30 fathoms each 4 

Plug, life boat. United States Navy 18 

IJ-inch link, 12 feet each 2 

Ij-inch link, 3 fathoms long , 1 

1-inch link, 120 feet 1 

leashing, 6 ifeet each 4 

Anchor — « 

41-inch link, 5 fathoms 1 

4-inch link, 15 fathoms 1 

3J-inch link, 150 fathoms 1 



SHIPPING BOARD OPEKATIONS. 1431 

Chain — Continued. 

Anchor— Continued. Quantity. 

4|-inch link, 120 fathoma 1 

S)-inch link, 166 fathonus 11 

Bnm, l-inch link pounds. . 12 

Chair: 

Camp, wood 7 

Steamer, wood 70 

Chutee, slop iron, 4 by 6 feet 1 

Chinmeys, lamp, clear: 

7J by l-inoi base 40 

7J by 1 J inch base 28 

91 bv li inch base 36 

10 by 2 inches : 12 

Chisels: 

Wood, assorted 32 

Cape 11 

(^ofd * 6 

Bar-— 

18-inch I 

3-inch 1 

24-inch ■ 1 

Charts, aborted 200 

Charges: 

Fire extinjrnisher, M. <& M 257 

Friamite. tine 3 

Clock?: 

German — 

6-inch 1 

Simmons & Haske 1 

Nickel, 6-inch dial 1 

Master — 

No. 1 1 

No. 2 1 

Clinometer: 

Braes 2 

German Tspirit).^ 1 

Plati, Hamburg 1 

Clamp: 

Beam 2 

Cable and chain. German I -.^ 

4-f(K)t 2 

Sea 1 

Hose 12 

Hand, wrought iron, 8 by 24 inch 1 

Cleats, rail, galvanized iron. ! 28 

Couplings: 
Braas— 

' l-inch 2 

l^nch 1 

Galvanized iron — 

l}-inch 17 

2i-inch 13 

21-inch 1 

Cowl, c'>ver 1 

Connecti>ns. 4-way: 

Brass 12 

Galvanized iron, i-inch 1 

Brass — 

21-inch 2 

l}-inch 1 

CompasB: 

Anschutz Co., Berlin 2 

Radio, serial No. 48622 1 

Radio ccmtrol switch, SE., type 713-B 1 

l^ife boat, U. S. N., No. 50223 1 

Binnacle, no Naw standard 



1432 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

GompaflB — Continued. QuMUty. 

Geirman, gyroscope 2 

Bearing 2 

Complete -. I 

Binnacle, No. 15 and stand 1 

Boat— 

W/0 oil lamps 47 

W oil lamps 16 

U.S.N 8 

Covers: 

Boat, canvas 55 

Hatch, canvas, 20 by 18 by 24 feet 8 

For cable reels, canvas 9 

Chain, pipe 2 

Cord, sash feet. . 2, 050 

Containers, sounding tube, brass 10 

Compass, binnacle and sextant, complete 1 

Controller for general alarm^ bridge .* 1 

Connections, pipe, brass, 2-inch 3 

Cradle, outer 2 

Cups, grease: 

Brass : 22 

Brass, No. 2 11 

Brass 14 

Cut-off, blacksmith, for anvil: 

2 by 11 inches 1 

4 by 9 inches 1 

4 by lOJ inches 1 

11 by 13i inches 1 

Cutters, pipe, single 1 

Cutters, bolt, No. 2 1 

Cushions, leather, 2 by 5 feet 1 

Davits, outer 2 

Dies: 

1-inch 2 

iVu^<^ 1 

finch , 3 

^-inch 1 

1-inch ^ 2 

2f.inch 1 

IJ-inch 1 

l} by 2 inches 1 

X-inch 1 

f-inch 1 

Arinch 1 

}-inch 1 

i^inch 1 

^inch i 1 

3-inch 1 

2-inch 1 

^inch bolt 1 

J-inchbolt 2 

1-inch bolt 1 

Disks for shuffle board 6 

Dividers, 6-inch 3 

DooiB, weather, wood, set 4 

Dogs for ash door, WI 3 

D^ls: 

A-inch 23 

X-inch 2 

f-inch 5 

finch 19 

f-inch 2 

i|-inch 2 

g-inch 5 

Sinch 2 

inch I 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1483 

Drills — Continued. Quantity. 

J^hiiich 

f-inch 

J-inch 

1-inch 

i-inch h 

^mch 1' 

if-inch 

l|-inch 

-jV-inch 

Electric, 110 volts 3 

Breast ; 6 

Elki: 

Redilcing, If to 1 inch 3 



)-inch 6 

f-inch 1 

1-inch 2 

lV-iii<^^ 3 

45-degroe — 

}-inch 6 

|-inch 62 

1-inch .• 9 

If-inch 1 

l}-inch 1 

Galvanized iron — 

f-inch 5 

1-inch 13 

1 J-inch 1 

li-inch 5 

2f-inch 3 

2Wnch 19 

3}-inch 1 

2|-inch, 45-degree 12 

1-inch, 45-degree 24 

f-inch, 45-degTee 7 

1 J-inch, 45-d^;ree 7 

If -inch, 45-deg;ree 11 

|-inch, 45 degree 1 

Black iron, 1-inch, 45-degree 18 

Iron — 

14-inch 5 

IJ-inch 1 

Emery cloth quires. . 89 

Engine, steam-steering. Atlas Werke 1 

Eztingiushers, fire: 

German 15 

American 45 

Faucets: 
Brass — 

i-inch 43 

1-inch 25 

Nickel-plated, 1 f-inch •- 3 

Feeder, oil: 

Copper, pint 2 

Brass 5 

Tin 1 

Fenders: 

Rope, large 1 9 

Wood- 
Round, 6-foot 17 

Square, 12 by 4 feet 7 

Rope, 6 by 3 feet 1 

Fids: 

Small 8 

4-foot. ...V 8 

177068— 20— FT 4 ^13 



1434 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Hie: . 

Flat— QuMititF. 

4-inch 4 

14-inch 7 

10-inch 14 

11-inch Z 

13-inch 5 

Rat-tail— 

7i-inch 1 

8-inch 1 

9-inch 1 

10-inch 4 

1 1-inch 3 

12-inch 1 

14-inch 1 

Square — 

9-inch 1 

10-inch 2 

14-inch 3 

Half-round — 

8-inch 2 

10-inch 3 

14-inch , 5 

16-inch 1 

'Rasp — 

12-inch 1 

14-inch 1 

Flags: 

United States- 
No. 3 1 

No. 6 6 

No. 9 11 

No. 7 6 

International Code — 

No. 3 set. . 1 

No. 4 do 1 

United States niail 1 

Sigiial, iceberg, 5 by 8 feet 1 

Union Jack — 

No. 6 2 

No. 3 2 

No. 2 1 

No. 9 2 

United States Shippine Board — 

No. 12 1 

No. 10 1 

Greece, No. 2 1 

Uruguay, No. 2 1 

Austria, No. 2 1 

Chile, No. 2 1 

Bolivia, No. 2 1 

Cuba, No. 2 1 

Venezuela, No. 2..^ 1 

Panama, No. 2 1 

Madagascar, No. 2 1 

Britirfi, No. 1 1 

Italy, No. 1 1 

Spain^ No.2 1 

Liberia, No. 2 1 

San Salvador, No. 2 1 

German, No. 2 1 

Turkey, No. 2 1 

Hayti , No . 2 1 

Costa Rica, No. 2 1 

Colombia, No. 2 1 

Ecuador, No. 2 1 

Guatemala, No. 2 1 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1485 

Flag^-Contiiiued. Quantity. 

wig-wag, dgpal set. . 4 

Semaphore signal do 2 

Flagstaff, metal 1 

Flangera: 

firaas, 2} inches, pairs. . 4 

Iron, 2J iDches do 4 

Floats, wood 16 

Frame: 

4 compartments 1 

Port and glass 8 

Funnels, nickel-plated 4 

Puses, 80 to 500 W 9 

Gaskets: 

Rubber pounds. . 10 

J by J inch pounds. . 15 

}by {inch do 5 

by li inch do.... 125 

f by f inches do 65 

Port, i inch do 50 

f by IJ inches do 25 

} by If inches do 20 

I by l| inches do 15 

I by 1 inch do 10 

Port, 24 by 24 inches , 81 

Hose, 2i inches 25 

Rubber, i by } inch pounds. . 2 

Helmet 3 

Face plate 6 

Gauge: 

Iron pipe, 32-inch 1 

Marker, wood 4 

Gautline, Manila: 

3 inches, 20 feet each 6 

4 inches, 20 feet each 4 

^ inches, 15 feet each 4 

2 inches, 20 feet each 1 

Gears, brass, for best winches 13 

Gears, brass 26 

Gnnlet 1 

Glass: 
Port- 

20 by 24 by 1 inch 1 

20 by 24 by f inch 1 

24 by 24 by i inch 5 

18 by 30 by } inch 5 

16 by 1 inch 15 

18 by 28 by I inch 2 

16 by finch 18 

15Jby linch 19 

20 by J by 14i inches 6 

20 by 15 by f inch 3 

14 by 1 inch * 8 

12 by 1 inch 24 

12by finch 10 

10 by 1 inch 14 

18 by 1 inch 23 

12 by IJ inches 4 

10 by finch 10 

12 by 24 by 1 inch 8 

Sheet, red— 

4 by 12J inches 10 

8by 12infche8 8 

Frosted, 28 inches by 30 feet 3 

Glycerine 5-gallon can. . 31 

Gougefl, wood 7 

Graphite, flake pounds. . 57 

Grating, wood 18 



1436 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Grease: Quantity. 

Albany pounds . . 20 

Tinned do 90 

Lubricant do 25 

Univeraal, hard do 100 

Lubricant, Universal, medium do 480 

Lubricant mineral do 300 

Globe: 

Lamp, complete 1 

Air-tight 3 

Grinder, emery, with motor, 2 wheels 1 

Grindstone, with motor, mounted I 

Guards: 

Light 3 

Rat, 30 inches, galvanized iron 4 

Guides, wire sounding 2 

Gun, life-saving and short line, complete, JGW Bercholtz 1 

Halyard, signal, coil: 

62 pounds each 5 

20 pK)undB each 1 

Hammer: 
Sledge — 

5-pound 5 

8-pound 2 

10-pound : 1 

12-pound 1 

Ball pean 8 

Spike, No. 6 4 

Brick, No. 1 1 

Rivet, No. 5 1 

Claw 4 

Chipping 12 

Handles: 

Hammer, 3-foot ' 5 

Hammer, 20-inch 3 

Hammer 6 

Hatchet 6 

Hatchet, i-pound 1 

Hatchet 21 

Hawser: 

Lard cable, 2i-inchi 120 fathoms each 2 

Manila — 

15-inch, 120 fathoms each 1 

12-inch, 120 fathoms each 3 

15-inch, 40 fathoms each 1 

14-inch, 120 fathoms each. : 1 

12-inch, 100 feet 2 

Helmet, diver's suit 2 

Hinges, door, brass, 3-inch 10 

Hook: 

Patent 3 

Sister, pair 1 

Pilican, galvanized iron 53 

Loose 37 

Cargo, swivel 19 

Boat, gajvanized iron . . .* 78 

Shackle, single 1 

Bean 2 

Box with chain, pair 14 

Grappling 3 

Chain 5 

Horn, fog, German 1 

Hose: 

Rubber — 

i-inch feet. . 50 

li-inch do. . . . 50 

Canvas, No. 3, 50 feet each lengths. . 39 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1437 

Hose — Continued. 

Rubber— Continued. . Quantity. 

2i-inch, 50 feet each lengths. . 129 

2i-inch, 50 feet each, German 8 

24 inch, 25 feet each, Gennan 1 

Air feet. . 25 

Indicator : 

Preesure 2 

Revolution 5 

Indicator: 

Tell-tale 7 

Water-tight door 1 

Panel, metal, brass 1 

Fire alarm, German 1 

Iceberg, alarm I 

Rudder ^ 1 

Insulator: 

Masthead — 

24-inch 21 

14-inch 5 

Bell type 1 

Iron: 

Branding — 

Deck 1 

Vaterland 1 

Caulldiig 3 

Soldering — 

^inch 1 

1-inch 3 

lli^inch 1 

14-inch 1 

15-inch .' 2 

17-inch 2 

Breast plate 4 

Sheet, galvanized-iron, 3 feet by 8 feet 22 

Jack: 

Screw, 14-inch 1 

Hydraulic, 25- ton 1 

Jackets, life 2 

Jackstaff, metal 1 

Knives: 

Lifeboat 3 

Butcher 14 

Putty 3 

Draw 2 

Lacers, belt, 5-inch 1 

Ladders: 

Hold, 40-foot 4 

Pilot, 40-foot 8 

Flat steps, 15-foot 1 

Pilot, 72-foot 6 

Wood, 4-foot 1 

Step, 2-foot 1 

Step, 12-foot 1 

Divers', 2 sections, 8 and 10 feet 1 

Step, 8-foot 1 

Lant^ns, boat '- 12 

Lamp: 

Cargo 1 

Portable 1 

Lashing, manila, 5 fathoms each C 

Latches, night « 

Lathe and motor, 4-amp6re, wood turner 1 

Launch, motor, tio9ch, united States Navy, with following fixtures: 

Bell, brass. 8-inch 1 

Wire, insulated feet. . 25 

Pump, gas, brass, 3-foot 1 



1438 SHIPPING BOAKD OPERATIONS. 

Launch, motor, etc. — Continued. " QoMtltj. 

Wrench, open end 1 feet. . 1 

Sling, li-inch, manila 1 

Anchor chain, galvanized iron, f-inch flat 20 

Anchor, boat, ^vanized iron, 70 pounds 1 

Feeder, oil , copper, .f-pint 1 

Tank, gas, iron, cap, 50-gallon 2 

Primers, brass 2 

Boxes, lantern, port and starboard 2 

Fenders, rope. 7 

Rope, manila, 5-inch, fathoms 12 

Oars 4 

Rowlofcks 12 

Rudder 1 

Tiller I 

ITook, boat, 8 feet by 2 inches 1 

Preservers, life 2 

Bucket, galvanized, iron 1 

Water breaker, cap, 5 gallons 2 

Lead: 

Deep sea. No. 80 7 

Hand, No. 9 6 

'Hand. No. 8 1 

Hand, No. 6 5 

Fair for sounding machine S 

Sounding machine. No. 50 % 

20-pound piece, sounding I 

liOak, stopper, Colomes Pot 1 

Lens, helmets 7 

Letters, wood, German, set. 1 

Letters and numbers, steel, J-inch, complete set 1 

I^ights: 
Port- 
is by 17 bv } inch 4 

lOby 17iby linch 9 

13 by 17 by i inch 1 

14 by 20 by i inch 1 

18 by 20 by 1 inch 6 

10 by 18 by i inch '. 3 

10 by 30 by i inch 4 

15iby 1 inch ; 5 

14 by 18 bv H inches 4 

14 by 20 by t inch 2 

Search — 

48-inch, Werke, No. 7343 1 

Control 1 

20-inch dial. 30-ampere, with shutter 1 

Signal, assorted 2 

Water 13 

Calcium 2 

Cargo, cluster — 

11 bulbs 1 

Ibulb 2 

Signal, " Payne," cans, 12 in each 26 

Costin 1 

Red, in case, lifeboat 11 

Anchor, oil 2 

Portable 2 

Red. side, oil 2 

Electric, side 2 

Oil, bulkhead 1 

Anchor, oil, German 2 

Harbor, electric, clear, copp^ case, brass trim, round, 11 by 26 inches 2 

Harbor, oil, copper case, brass trim, round, 11 by 17 inches 1 

Harbor, oil, copper case, brass trim, round, clear, 11 by 17 inches 1 

Side, dear, oil f round, copper case, brass trim, 11 by 12 by 24 inches 1 

•*5Me, clear, oil, i round, 8 by 9 by 10 inches, copper case, brass trim 3 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 



1439 



Liglito— Continued. Quantity. 

Side, clear, oil, } round, copper case, brass trim, 9 by 10 by 13 inches 1 

Port J round, clear, oil, tin case, 5 by 8i by 9 inches 1 

Port, tin case, red, 5 by 8J by 9 inches 1 

Port, tin case, red, 6 by 6 by 10 inches 1 

Starboard, tin case, green, 5 by 8J by 9 inches 1 

Starboard, tin case, green, 5 by 6 by 10 inches 1 

Dead 6 

Lines: 

Life 60 

Manila, 4i inches, 40 feet each 2 

Hearing : 1 

Life, manila 2} inches, 7 feet eadi 5 

Heaving 8 

Clothes, Navy 1 

Deep sea, lead 1 

Cod, j)ound 50 

CottAi , pound 5 

Signal 2 

Log, coils, 20 pounds each 10 

Links, connecting, patent: 

3} inches 8 

2) inches 2 

Lockers, flag 3 

Log, tafifrail: 

NeguB, No. 2 1 

German, C platter 2 

Lockers: 

Grear, 5 feet 6 inches by 3 feet 6 inches by 1 foot 6 inches 1 

Quartermaster, 1 foot 6 inches by 2 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 6 inches 1 

Lve, cans 148 

mdiine: 

Sounding 1 

Grerman 1 

Sewing, hand, No. 74771042 1 

Sail maker, with motor, Singer, G-6083998 1 

Binding timers 1 

MaUets: 

Small, wood 1 

Serving 1 

Wood, 1 pound 2 

Copper, 2 pounds 1 

Magnets, laige, sets 2 

Manifolds 2 

Marlin pounds. . 90 

Mast, Ufeboat 36 

Mats: 

Manila, 4 by 15 feet 2 

Sword, 2 by 6 feet 1 

Marlin spikes 2 

Measure: 

Copper, 1 gallon 1 

Fathoms • 

Medical kit, lifeboat 11 

Megaphone, fiber: 

26 inches 2 

36 inches 2 

18 inches 6 

Mercury, liquid pounds. . 20 

Mittens, for diver's suit, rubber 2 

Motor: 

Gesellschaft, lifeboat 2 

Elect for boat winch, 8. and S 10 

Mount, for 3-ann protractor 1 

NaUs: 

Clout pounds. . 25 

Set 1 



1440 SHIPPING BOABD 0PERATI0K8. 

Nailfl — Continued. Quantity. 

Wire pounds. . 100 

Wire do.... 750 

Spike do 000 

Wire do 200 

Lathe do 100 

Shingle do 350 

Needles, magnetic, bundles 9 

Net, mesh, 1 inch by 8 by 30 feet 1 

Nipples: 

Brass, 3i»inch 1 

Brass, 2-iAch 1 

Brass, 21-inch, assorted 5 

Galvanized iron, 2f-inch, assorted 19 

Galvanized iron, J-inch 12 

Galvanized iron, 1-inch 12 

Nippers, pair ^ 2 

Nozzle: 

Brass, 3-inch 54 

Brass, 2i-inch 86 

Brass, German, assorted 9 

Nuts: 

Lock — 

H-inch 3 

Ifinch 3 

2Hnch 3 

2finch 3 

Brass, j-inch pounds. . 3 

Oakum do 150 

Oars: 

10-foot 8 

14-foot 6 

Lifeboat 1 668 

Oil: 

Linseed, boiled eaUons. . 10 

Linseed, raw barrels. . 1 

Sperm gallons. . 110 

Castor do 10 

S^linder do 30 

ineral, lubricant light do 85 

Oarlocks: 

Galvanized iron 26 

Lifeboat 686 

Lifeboat socket 799 

Old man 1 

Overalls, diver's suit, rubber 4 

Pad, plate, breast 3 

Padlocks, Yale 10 

Paint: 

Gray gallon. . 65 

Shellac, orange do 16 

White, flat do 2 

Oil varnish do 5 

Shellac do 3 

Drier, japan do 24 

Black.. do 50 

Mi^ogany do 4 

White do 60 

Gray stack do 60 

Black boat topping .do 20 

Antifouling do 45 

Battleship, gray do 10 

White enamel do 20 

Anticorrosive do 40 

Red Boot topping do 10 

White, outfiide do 10 

Yamiflfa, mixed : do 20 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1441 

Paint — Continued. Quantity. 

Appliance black gallon . . 15 

Span color do 1 

O^kum yellow pounds. . 25 

Prussian blue do 90 

Chrome green do 70 

Burnt amber do 32 

Raw amber do 10 

Sienna, burnt do 15 

Redlead, in oil gallon . . 2 

Redlead, powder pDunds. . 300 

Putty in oil do. . . . 120 

Piinter, life boat: 

20 feet by 3^ inches ' 2 

40 feet by 3i injchee 3 

120 feet by 4 inches 35 

15 feet by 3J inches 1 

40 feet by 4 inches 3 

60 feet by 4 inches 1 

120 feet by 3i inches 6 

120 feet by 3 inches 1 

75 feet by 3J inches 1 

20 feet by 4 inches 1 

48 feet by 1} inches 5 

150 feet by 3 inches 3 

30 feet by 4 inches 5 

30 feet by 4 inches 5 

30 feet by 3i inches 2 

Pans, dust 9 

Paper, toilet, rolls 15 

PeloniB, dummy 1 

Pins: 

Shadow in case 9 

Belaying 11 

For anchor shackle, 4J-inch 1 

Drift 1 

Drift, iron, 15-inch 8 

Pins: 

Drift, st^el, 2J by 8i inches 4 

Brass, J by 7 J inches 1 

Brass, f by 10 inches 1 

Brass, J by 8 J inches 1 

Brass, 1 by 18 inches 2 

Hpe: 

Lead, 2}-inch feet . . 27 

Lead, j-inch do 20 

Lead, 1 J-i^^cl^ do 12 

Lead, 1-inch do 8 

l^ead, 2-inch do 7 

Galvanized -iron, 1-inch 5 feet each . . 3 

Copper, J-inch do I 

Brass, 1-mch 4 feet each . . 6 

Pistol, very 5 

^ot, glue, electric 1 

Powder, washing pounds . . 10 

Polish, brass, 16 ounces in each can cans. . 114 

Planes: * 

Iron, 14-inch: 5 

Block iron 1 

Plow, Stanley 1 

Wooden, 8-inch 1 

Preservers, life 23 

Protractor, in case and parts complete, 0. P. lath I 

Projectiles 3 

Plugs: 

Iron, 1-inch 12 

Dmn hole, lifeboat 13 



1442 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Qnantitf. 

Platform, Leadznan's 2 

Plate, face, complete 2 

PBychrometer 1 

Pump, handy, belly 2 

Puncn and cutter, combination 3d 1 

Punch: 

Center 1 

Leather 18 

Rack: 

Hose 27 

Chart and top, 1 J by 1 J inches 1 

Radio, receiver, short-range type, SE1012, complete 1 

Rasps, 14-inch 4 

Ratchet 1 

Ratchet, 18-inch 5 

Recorder, depth: 

Lord Kelvin 1 

Kelion No. 9370 1 

Reducers: 

Brass, 2 to 1 J inches 2 

Brass, 2} to IJ inches 6 

Brass, 2i to 1} inches 3 

Brass, 2J to 3 inches 2 

Galvanized iron, 1 J to 1 inch 6 

Galvanized iron, 1} to IJ inches 13 

Galvanized iron, 2i to l| inches 6 

Iron, If to 1} inches 4 

Brass, hose, SJ to 3 inches feet . . 6 

Brass, hose, 2^ to 3 inches do 6 

Nickel plated, 1 to } inch : 6 

Reels: 

Cable 13 

Hose 57 

Reflector, lamp, 6 inches round 9 

Return, iron, 1} inches 2 

Rivets, copper: 

J by A inch pounds.. 2 

I by f inch do I 

■jV by I inch do 2 

}by 1 inch do 5 

by } inch do 2 

A by li inches do 2 

i-inch do 40 

}-inch do 20 

2-inches do 5 

Rings: 

Life 2 

Mast, wood 16 

Life, 30-inrh 9 

Life, 1 8-inch 3 

Rockets: 
Signal- 
Red 96 

Blue 24 

Night 15 

Rod, sounding, 5-inch f.. 1 

Rope: 

Manila — 

3-inch fathom . . 150 

4J-inch do 60 

3i-inch do 166 

14-inch do 80 

4-inch do 66 

5-inch do 18 

Durable — 

Wire, }-inch, 15 fathoms each 8 

Wire, }-inch. 25 fathoms each 7 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1443 

Hope — Cont inued . 

Manila — Quantity. 

2J-mch fathom. . 80 

2-inch/. do. ... 165 

14-iiich coil . . 1 

4i-inch do 2 

Screws: 

Steel, l^-inchee round handle pounds . . 3 

Steel. J-inch round handle do 2 

Braas. 1 J-inch square handle do 2 

Wood, g^vanized iron 3-inch gross. . 2 

Brass, | by 1} inches, flathead pounds. . 3 

Brass. | by 2 inches, flathead do 3 

Brass. ^ by IJ inches, flathead do 6 

Screws, rigger. .' 1 

Scrubbers, deck 70 

Sextant: 

Negus, and case No. 24637 1 

K . & E . , N o . 14282 1 

Shackles 75 

Shackles: 

Anchor binding, 5J-inch 3 

Anchor binding, 34;inch 3 

Anchor binding, 3-inch 2 

Anchor, double link, 3i-inch 5 

3-inch 4 

Shackling, set 1 

Shears: 

Trimmer, pair 3 

lO-inch 9 

Shells, night signal 337 

Shoes, pair, diverts, lead bottom 3 

Shovel: 

Scoop 25 

Sand 1 

Showerhead, nickel plate 1 

Slabs, marble: 

6 by 24 inches 1 

12 by 24 inches 1 

14 by 24 inches 1 

24 by 24 inches 1 

Slings: 

Manila, 4-inch 18 

life boat wire, IJ-inch 3 

Life boat wire, f-inch 9 

Chain 10 

Barrel 1 

Cargo wiUi 3 lengths of chain 1 

Manila, 3-inch 17 

Wire— 

}-inch 1 

' Ladder 5 

4 fathoms each, If-inch 2 

4 fathoms each, f-inch 5 

4 fitthoms each, 1-inch 1 

4 fathoms each, {-inch 1 

Sledge, 8-inch 6 

Sleeve, horn 3 

Soda: 

Caustic ^ pounds. . 2 

Washing do 6 

Solder, bar do.... 2 

™pfl, tinners 3 

Spanner, hose 84 

Spider, in case K. and E 1 

Spirits, petroleum gallous. . 5 

Sponges, diver's suit 12 



1444 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Squares: Qnantity. 

Bevel, 6-inch i 

Steel, 24-inch ? 

Squi'gee 40 

Squil^ee and handles 84 

Staging: 

Wood and lines 3 

With line 2 

Stanchion, post 4 

Stand, pelorus 1 

Stock: 

26-inch 1 

18-inch 1 

30-inch 1 

Large fourlum 1 

8-foot 1 

4-foot 2 

14-inch 1 

1 9-inch 1 

30-inch 1 

36-inch 1 

26-inch 1 

48-inch 1 

Stock and die, No. 1, U. S. N., complete 1 

Stock and die, Little Giant, 2i by 5 by 10^ inches 1 

Stools, camp 2 

Stoppers: 

Manila, 4i-inch - 12 

Chain 1 

4-inch 2 

Hemp and eye splices, 4}-inch 1 

50 fathoms, 4-inch 1 

Leak, Colomes patent 2 

Straps: 

Manila, 4-inch 2 

Hemp 2 

Wire 1 

Assorted, 3i by 4 inches 12 

Ballard, 14-inch, 5 feet each 8 

Belt 1 

Manila, 4i-inch 2 

Suit: 

Diver's, dress, rubber 4 

Life-saving 1 

Swabs: 

Hand. .' 64 

Deck 134 

Switch set. . 1 

Switchboard 2 

Switch control, bulkhead door 1 

Strongbacks, for coal bunker 28 

Tackle, watch, 2 single blocks, 50 fathoms. 21 thread hemp 3 

Tacks, carpet pounds.'. 1 

Tank: 

Copper, 14 by 24 by 30 inches 1 

Oil, lifeboat, empty, cap, 1 gallon 43 ' 

Oil, lifeboat, full, cap, 1 gallon 1 

Tape, friction, rolls 3 

Taps: 

1-inch .' 7 

finch 10 

2.inch 2 

2i-inch 1 

2J-inch 1 

f -inch 3 

i-inch 1 

^-inch 6 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1445 

Taps - Con tinued . Quantity . 

A-incb 2 

T^-inch 6 

J-inch 6 

A-inch 6 

f-inch ,. 6 

Galvanized iron — 

}-inch 5 

i-inch 6 

i-inch 2 

1-inch 3 

H-inch 58 

H-inch * 4 

li-inch 26 

li-inch 7 

l|-inch 1 

2Hnch 16 

3*-inch 1 

2finch 2 

Brass — 

2-inch 1 

i-inch 6 

1-inch 6 

1-inch 12 

IJ-inch 10 

Telemeter, complete, atlas words 2 

Telephone: 

Engine room 3 

Mates' 2 

Steeiin|[ 4 

Submarine, complete 2 

Patented 7 

Portable 1 

Loud speaking 3 

Sub-connection 2 

Diver's complete, set 4 

Thennometer, tin, 1 second to 160° F 6 

Thermometer, nickel plate 3 

Thermometer, No. 1102 1 

Thermometer, No. 1110 1 

Thimble, Cungles, assorted 15 

Thimble, assorted, galvanized iron 12 

Thread: 

Yellow, spools 15 

Red, spools 7 

Black, spools 3 

Tiller, lifeboat 26 

Tongs: 

Ice, small 1 

Chain, 18-inch 1 

Blacksmith 1 

Chain, 30-inch 1 

Tools, blacksmith '. 7 

Toggles, wood 17 

Trucks, hand 5 

Tubes: 

Sounding, chemical 640 

Sounding, machine 45 

Speaking 1 

Tumbuckles 12 

Tumbuckles, IJ-inch 1 

Turner, torch 1 

Twine, sail, cotton balb.. 8 

vjniouB: 

Brass, IJ-inch 6 

Brass, |-inch 5 



1446 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Unionfl —Continued. Quantity. 

BraflB, 2^inch 1 

Brass, 2|-inch Z 

Joint brass, 2-inch 4 

Galvanized iron, f-inch 1 

Galvanized iron, If-inch 

Galvanized iron , 2}-inch 19 

Cralvanized iron, 2}-inch S 

Iron, l}-inch 1 

Iron, 2i-inch 1 

Hose 9 

Urinal, rubber 4 

Valve: 

Safety , 2 

Air control 1 6 

Check 14 

Nickel plate, 1-inch S 

Unions, nickel plated, } inch 1 

Valves: 

Nickel plated, IJ-inch 4 



2J-inch 9 

Ifinch 28 

J-inch la 

H-inch 21 

1-inch : 4 

4-inch 2 

Vises: 

Pipe 2 

Jaw: 

4-inch 1 

5-inch S 

6-inch 2 

Washers: 

Hose, 2-inch 28S 

Leather, 2-inch 150 

Water breakers, galvanized iron 1 

Water, distilled, carboys 2 

Water breakers, lifeboat: 

25-gallon 48 

10-gallon a 

5-gallon 78 

Watches: 

Comparing, No. 1090, United States Navy 1 

Stop, Rose Watch Co 1 

Wax: 

Paraffin pounds. . 90 

Bus do 5 

Wedges, iron 3 

Weights: 

Chart 6 

Hose 5 

Whistle, control 6 

Whistle, steam, brass, 3 by 9 by 25 inches 8 

Wheels: 

For driving pump, 3-foot 2 

Balance driving pump, 36-inch diameter 2 

Steering, motor-boat, 2-foot 2 

Steering, motor-boat 1 

Winches: 

Cargo 18 

Electric '. 1 

Electric lifeboat 28 

Windlass, anchor, complete 1 

Wind sails 3 

Wind-sail bags 2 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1447 

Wire: Quantity. 

Sizing pounds. . 90 

Annature do 30 

Galvanized iron do 70 

Antennae, coD 2 

Sounding machine reela. . 6 

Bridle, 1-inch 1 

Wireless out6t, complete: 

5-kilowatt Telifunker 1 

Outfit complete, l^-ldlowatt — 

Telifunker 1 

Zone set 1 

Wonn shaft for boat winch 6 

Wire, reels, pennant, and tackle, galvanized iron, l^inch 3 

Wrenches, monkey: 

8-inch 2 

6-inch 16 

14-inch 10 

24-inch 2 

36-inch 1 

10-inch 2 

18-inch 2 

21-inch 4 

20-inch 1 

Stilson — 

6-inch 5 

10-inch 1 

14-inch : 2 

12-inch 5 

36-inch 1 

24-inch 3 

30-inch 1 

20-inch 1 

Open end — 

l^inch, sinde 1 

2-inch, single 1 

1-inch, single 2 

1 J-inch, single 4 

l}-inch, single 3 

Ij-inch, single 1 

2|-inch, single 1 

|-inch, single 3 

|-inch, single 4 

2}-incn, single 1 

IJrinch, single 5 

3-inch, single 2 

f-inch, single 2 

IJ by 1 incn, double 2 

if by IJ-inch, double 1 

2by 2f-inch, double 1 

1 by l}-inch, double 2 

J by |-inch, double 4 

by 1-inch, double 2 

f bv f-inch, double 2 

IJ by IJ-inch, double 1 

Coal bunker 14 

Spanner 2 

Tee helmet 2 

Key 1 

Key, ^inch 1 

Key, 1-inch 2 

Key, assorted 12 

Breast plate 2 

Socket— 

Ijrinch 3 

. 1-inch 1 

)-inch. i 1 



1448 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Wrenrhe?*, monkev — Continued. 
Socket — Continued. 

Bunker— QnanUty. 

2ibv 35-inch 2 

2J by 35-inch 5 

Wrifltlete, pair 1 

Y*jB galvanized iron, 2}-inch 3 

DECK DEPARTMENT — SUPPLEMENT. 

Blankets, crew 24 

Boats, life 42 

Chest, galvanized iron, 2 by 2 by 1§ 1 

Charges for portable 1 

Drees, rubber 1 

Fid 1 

Fan, 10-inch 1 

Glass, plate, 26 by 30 1 

Hammer, maul 4 

Hose, connecting 3 

Links, connecting, 3Hich 3 

Oil, leather for pistols 3 

Paper, emery, quires 2 

Pilot ladder rings 13 

Stone, ground 1 

Shape, day 3 

Screws, brass, round head : 

i by H pounds. . 2 

ibyl do.... 1 

Tees, 2\, galvanized iron 4 

Inventory of stores and equipment on steamship "Leviathan,** Mar. 1, 19t0, taken hf 

International Mercantile Marine Co. 

steward's DEPARTMENT. 

Bambree: 

Galvanized iron, 22 by 25 by 4 inches 4 

Copper — 

16 by Hi by 9J inches 1 

24i by 24 by 15 inches 2 

25 by 15i inches 1 

Bar, slice, 18 inches 1 

Barometer, No. 654 (see Plate, Hamburg) 1 

Bath, 8ho\\er, 60 by 33 by 33 inches 1 

Basket: 

Linen, 26 by 18 by 9 inches 1 

Plain, 10 by 14 inches 1 

Fiber wire 10 

Waste paper — 

Mache 30 

Wicker 33 

Wire dish washer 24 

Bread 5 

Wire dish , 16} inches by 8 feet 10 

Linen 1 

Wire— 

With 4 file compartments 1 

With 3 file compartments 1 

Silver, 9 by 14 inches 4 

Cutlery, 13 by 10 by 4 inches 9 

Bushel 2 

French fry — 

Oval 1 

Oval, galvanized iron 1 

BasiSi wash, wnite enamel, 16-inch r . 1 

Beds: 

Braes 24 

Wood 1 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1449 

Bed»— Oontinued. Quantity- 
White enamel 456 

Foot stead 54 

Head stead 54 

Bench: 

Drop leaf- 
is by 18 inches :.. 2 

24 by 18 inches 3 

Meas 104 

Piano — 

Leather seat 1 

Wood seat 1 

Upholstered, attached to bulkhead 2 

Wood back and side aims, 134 by 39 by 13 inches 6 

Bell, alarm 6 

Bins: 

Wood 34 

Dish 54 by 28 by 25 inches 1 

Blankets, wool: 

Double 8 

Single, white 55 

Third cabin, 72 by 60 inches 130 

Second cabin, 72 "by 50 indies Ill 

86 by 62 inches 5 

146 by 48 inches., 12 

80 by 60 inches 2 

168 by 60 inches 264 

100 by 60 inches 3 

90 by 60 inches 24 

86 by 72 inches -... 368 

And cotton, single, Navy 19 

Block: 

CSarving — 

15 by 12 by li inches 6 

29 by 20 by 2i inches 1 

Wood , 4 by 3 feet 1 

Butcher — 

38 by 30 by 15 inches * 3 

Attached to galvanized-iron frame, 62 by 27 by 2 inches 1 

CJhopping, 30 by 19 by 2i inches 1 

Meat, 4 legs, 47 by 35 by 12 inches 1 

Blanket: 

Odds and ends, Navy 10 

Wool, double, crew 4 

CJotton — 

Double, crew 5 

Single, crew 1 63 

Camel hair — 

Single 6 

Double 1 

Bertha, wood 146 

Boards: 

Menu 1 

Bulletin- 
Felt cover 32 by 24 inches 9 

Glass door, brass guards 22 

Glass door 4 

Plain 18 

Drain — 

Copper covered 1 

Plain 8 

Carving — 

18 by 12 by li inches 1 

28 bv 15 by 4 inches 9 

36 bv 24 by 2* inches 3 

Key , 24 by 12 inches 2 

File :. 3 

177068— 20— PT 4 14 



1450 SHIPPING BOARD 0PBRATI0N8. 

Boarde: QnaKttf; 

Ironing 1 

Bulletin, glass door, 27 by 20 inches 2 

Boiler^ water: 

5 inches 1 

10 inches ; 5 

Dental office 1 

15 gallons, nickel plated 1 

Boat, gravy , china 1 

Bolts, door 1 

Bottles, water 169 

Bowl: 

Foot, porcelain, 26 by 18 inches 1 

Breakfast, 4 inches 2 

Vermit 2 

Wooden, 8 inches 1 

Sugar, china 1 

Wooden, deep 12 by 4 inches 1 

Copper, mixing cake 13 by 10 inches 1 

Galvanized iron, mixing cake 20 by 8 inches 1 

Douche 8 

Mixing, 36 inches 1 

Wash stand, porcelain 21} by 16 inches 75 

Enamel, 5 inches 45 

Mixing, returned, 24 inches 1 

Boot, leg, 17 by 15 by 12 inches tin and' top 6 

Bolster: 

Foot 1 

Tapeetrv 9 

Mattfess 300 

Couch 11 

Box: 

Boat 1 

Ditty 10 

Spice,- tin 12 by 10 inches 6 

Ice — 

2 doors, galley 1 

4 compartments .' 1 

5 comparteents, 8 doors 

10 by 8 by 2 J feet 1 

Mail, 24 by 15 b>r 6 inches 1 

Puratin, 4 feet 1 inch by 3 feet 7 inches by 2 inches 1 

Silver, 14 by 9 inches 4 

Ice and wood, galvanized iron, 46 by 32 by 25 inches 1 

Broiler, galvanized iron, 15 by 11 inches 6 

Brush: 

Hair 1 

Scrubbing 8 

Deck 1 

Pastry, No. rubb^rset 1 

Brackets, lamp, brace 7 

Buckets: 

Galvanized iron 90 

Enamel, 12 by 9} inches 6 

Wood 5 

Bureau: 

4 drawers ^ 1 

2 doors, 1 draw 1 

6 drawers 5 

29i by 62 by 25 inches 1 

Butt, scuttle, nickel-plated brace handle 1 

Bertlis, galvanized iron 24 

Cabinets: 

Pile, wood 3 

Open , wood 2 

File, steel 4 

Paper 1 



SHIFPnfrG BOABD OFERATIOKS. 1461 

Oftbinets— Continued. Quantity. 

Washatand 4 

Built in 14 

Walnut 3 

Chamber 2 

Desk 2 

Book inUdd 1 

Dresaing 4 

Card 1 

Steel locker 1 

Toilet, metal.. J 28 

Clothes 4 

Medicine T 1 

Toilet, wood 5 

Book, small 1 

China 2 

White enamel 4 

Writing, 18-inch 1 

Music 6 

Wood 10 

Phonograph record 1 

Inlain (imperial suite) 4 

Steel, first-aid, 19 by 12i inches 1 

Case, fiUng, 11 compartments, wood 1 

Gase: 

Key 1 

Book and cabinet. 2 

Chorometer. 1 

Casserole: 
Dishea— 

7 by 2i inches 1 

Cover 19 

9 by 3i inches 6 

6-inch..., 2 

China, 4-inch 1 

5 by 4i inches 2 

Cupet: 

Linoleum (imperial suite) 2 

Stateroom 137 

Runners..: 49 

Pieces of 70 

Oarrier: 

Water, 10-gtflon 1 

Glass 3 

Water, 2-quart 53 

Can: 

Garbage 8 

Ice cream, 10-gallon 20 

Cap. strainers, china, 8-inch 3 

Cham, sink 2 

Chairs: 

Dining, upholstered, seat and back 222 

Arm, wicker : 8 

Steamer, wood 1 

Cane and wicker 6 

Bath, white enamel x 21 

Swivel 15 

Hall, second class social , 28 

Library ; 2 

Stateroom, first class 242 

Arm tapestiy, upholstered 23 

Card and table, first class 14 

Upholstered, seat and back 6 

Round arm, upholstered seat and back 63 

High, straight, back and seat, upholstered 15 

Square, tapestay upholstered seat, back, arm 6 

Loimging 1 



1462 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Chairs— Continued. Qwntlty. 

Inlaid oak, upholstered seat 2 

Upholstered 7 

Bedroom tapestry, upholstered, straight back 17 

Inlaid rosewood, tapestry upholstered 1 

High, oval, leather seat and back 7 

Barber, white enamel, leather, Koch & Co 7 

Wood, straight back 6 

Arm, leather, upholstered 4 

Leather seat and back, wood arm 6 

Leather seat and oval back 3 

Leather round arm, upholstered 6 

Arm, cane seat 2 

Rosewood, back, leather seat 2 

Wood, back and upholstered seat 1 

Cherry wood, back and cane seat 10 

Cane seat and back 18 

Swivel, leather seat • 15 

Cane seat and back, with cushion 10 

Carved back, upholstered Damaske 4 

Oval back 5 

Deck 1 

Straight back and cane seat : 1 

High back, swivel, leather 2 

Round back, swivel, leather 3 

Leather seat, wood back, officer's mess 86 

Leather seat and back, upholstered 13 

Electric massage 2 

Chest: 

Sea 1 

Clothes 1 

Medicine 1 

Wardrobe — 

30 by 24 by 18 inches 1 

31 by 42 inches 2 

Oak, 18 by 9 by 8i inches 1 

Cleaner, electric 3 

Clock: 

Chamber, bedroom 5 

Electric (Summons & Hoske) 176 

Wood frame 14 

Inlaid (Imperial suite No. 151) 1 

Brass 7 

Closet: 

Built-in 26 

Wood and galvanized-iron door 1 

Dish 2 

China, glass door 19 

Colanders, ^vanized-iron: 

12 bv 5 inches 1 

14} by 10 inches 2 

15i by 10 inches 1 

Coolers, water: 

Perfection 1 

Nickel-plated, 2 gallons 1 

12 by 12 inches and top 2 

Corer, apple 1 

Coal, hi^, for galley tons. . 7 

Containers: 

Liquid soap 48 

Broken 25 

Soap, on end of chain 14 

Grease, in galley 4 

Couch: 

Upholstered 62 

Leather, back and seat upholstered, 72 by 32 by 27 inches 1 



8HIPi>Il»G BOARD OPfiRATloKS. 1453 

Comforts: QuanUty. 

SUk (Imperial suite) 7 

Colored 4 

Coummecator, ebony, 8 inches 1 

Covers: 

Felt and satin 2 

. Table- 
Tapestry 3 

Veiour 7 3 

Piano 2 

Or^an 1 

Baise fringed border, 52 by 46 inches 1 

Settee... 1 

MattresB, colored 6 

Typewriter 6 

lible, green, 8 inches 1 

Mattress 466 

Tkble 1 

Mattress, double 1 

Pot, galvanized iron, 9 inches 5 

China, 1 pint 1 

Rriut, tin : 2 

Pot, galvanized iron — 

13 inches 3 

11 inches •. « 4 

14 inches 2 

19i inches 6 

Kettle, galvanized iron 1 

Chafing dish — 

Nickel-plated, galvanized iron, oval, 14 inches 17 

Tin— 

11 inches, round 22 

18 inches, oval 1 

Cruets, oil and vinegar, glass 14 

Gotten, butter 3 

Cops: 

Tea, second class 3 

CofiFee, china • 106 

Mess, tin, 4 inches '. 100 

Cushion: 

Seat 8 

Settee— 

76 bv 24 inches 2 

48 by 18 inches 2 

Cuspidor: 

Nickel-plated .• . . . 4 

Glass 3 

Galvanixed-iron 1 

Curtains: 

Satin 26 

Veiour 4 

Berth 12 

Silk— 

4 feet bv 6 inches ^ 1 

12by8'feet 1 

30 inches 1 

Wardrobe « 

8* by 8 inches 1 

Drapery H 

T^ace 6 

Shower head 10 

Port, linen. 5 bv 2 feet 14 

Roller, linen, 3'bv 2 feet 3 

Port Shorton '. 7 

Pliish, 5 bv 3 feet , 1 

Damask, door 1 

Door 13 



1454 SHIPFIKG BOARD OPERAtlOKS. 

Curtains— Continued. QvtaUtf, 

Bookcaae, 35 by 26 inches 1 

Port 5S 

Port, with border 20 by 14 inches S 

Border, trimmed — 

4i inches by 3 feet 8 

6i inches by 3 feet 8 

Crowbar, 39-inch 1 

Pesk 76 

Roll-top 8 

Inlaid 8 

Scholara' 4 

Typewriter • 2 

Cabinet, glass door S 

With mirror 3 

Wall 31 

Typewriter, rosewood 1 

Sliding top, 34 by 28 by 24 inches : 1 

Fiber, 38 by 31 by 25 inches 1 

Baize, 39 by 30 by 25 inches 1 

Fiber, 46 by 29 inches I 

Dish: 

Soap, glass 140 

Sponge 13 

Vegetable, silver *. 1 

Shaving — 

8i-inch 47 

7-inch 17 

Agate, 15 by 11 by 3 inches 1 

Ice cream 7 

Vegetable, deep, 11 by 8 inches 4 

Au gratin — 

12.inch 9 

lOJ-inch 10 

13-inch 7 

14-inch 80 

15-inch 9 

Drains: 

Coffee 1 

Galvanized-iron, 12 by 12 inches 1 

Ice water, white enamel, 12 by 9 inches 1 

Dressers 42 

3 mirror doors «. 134 

Inlaid 4 

Semicircular 2 

Extinguishers, fire, 2}-inch, gallons 1 

Fans,, electric 249 

Faucets: 

Brass 74 

White metal 80 

Nickel and brass 2 

Flats, meat, china, 10-inch, second class 6 

Frame: 

Window, brass 2 

Picture 6 

Lan;e, gilded 5 

Wood, douche bowl 1 

Glass, shelf 1 

Forks: 

Crew 147 

Tormentor 6 

Gate, swinging, 32 by 30 inches 1 

Glasses: 

Water.... 104 

Wine, green 12 

Mulucher 33 

Fancy wine 1 



SHIFPINa BOAAD OPS&ATIONS. 1465 

Quantity- 
Slab, 68 by 32 by i mch 2 

light pieces 13 

Rose, 31 by 8i by i inch 1 

liffht, in frame, 23 oy 18 inches 1 

Grate, bnsB 1 

Grating, wood: 
Deck— 

27 by 21 inches 

36 by 24 inches 8 

Bath, 46 by 20 inches 8 

Gnazd: 

Heater, galvanized iron 

Fan, electric 

Fireplace, brass 

Grinder, coffee, 4 by 4 inches 

Hsmmockss, canvas 

Handles, swab 10 

HasBock, foot 9 

Heaters: 

Water 9 

Electric 228 

Headrest, upholstered 13 

Holders: 

Soap, glass 93 

Sponges 26 

Toothbrush 44 

Disinfecting 2 

Sanitary cup ^...- 3 

Antimat (agate) 1 

Water bottle 38 

Drinkinff glass 72 

Carpet, brass, 10-inch * 6 

Oandle— 

White metal 12 

Brass , 92 

Paper towel 1 

Iron, electric ^ 1 

Kottlco' 

Fish, tin, 14 by 9J inch 1 

Agate, 3 gallons 1 

Galvanized iron — 

5-inch 1 

13 by 4 inch 1 

Soup, galvanized iron — 

3 gallons 1 

9 by 6i inch 2 

7i by 7 inch 3 

10 by 9i inch 3 

With handles— 

3 gaUons 1 

10 by 5 inch 1 

Copper, fish, 16 by 2 inch 1 

CoPee, 5 gallons 3 

.Stew, 10 by 64 inch 4 

Knives: 

Crew 161 

Bread— 

9-inch 4 

8-inch 3 

Pallet, 17-inch 2 

Butcher, 19-inch 1 

Boning, 10-inch 1 

Ladles: 

5-inch 11 

8-inch 12 

4-inch 1 8 



1456 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Ladlee— Continued. Qowitltj. 

Steerage, tin 2 

Berth 15 

Lamps: 

Table 2 

Reading, portable 76 

Desk 14 

Reading, library, 30-inch 4 

Brass, electric 36 

Latch, night 8 

Life jackets 3 

light: 

Drop 1 

Bath, brass 2 

Cigar, and stand 1 

Locker: 

Wood, single 22 

?teel, 20 by 6i by 2 inches 3 

Sin^e, galvanized iron 2 

Double, galvanized iron 1 

Key, glass door 1 

Built-in 21 

Wood, double 1 

White enamel, double 1 

With mirror 2 

Confidential 1 

Mahogany, roll door 1 

Wire door, 80 by 20 by 20 inches 1 

Galvanizeid iron — 

24 by 17 inches 47 

5 compartments 

20 compartments, 46i by 56 by 12 by 12 inches 73 

45 by 12 inches 8 

Three doors, 75 by 18 by 18 inches '. 88 

Double^ 2 doors, 35 by 18 by 4J inches 8 

Galvanized iron — 

20 compartments, 103 by 24 by 12 inches 2 

Individual 12 by 12 by 12 inches 16 

42 by 31 by 21 inches 1 

66 by 12 by 12 inches 23 

20 compartments, 59 by 56 by 12 inches 30 

20 compartments, 49 by 47 by 12 inches 1 

4 compartments, 87 by 27 by 22 inches 3 

2 compartments, 26 by 18 by 18 inches 3 

46 by 22 by 1 4 inches 1 

75 by 36 by 18 inches 1 

Locks, wardrobe 2 

Loops, curtain 7 

Loimge, upholstered 13 

Mat, bath, turkish 24 

Mirror: 

No frame 56 

Wood frame 168 

Oval 23 

Folding, 3 folds 6 

Inlaid (Imperial suite) 2 

Brass frame, roimd 1 

Mill, coffee (Enterprise) 1 

Mold: 

Cake, tin 1 

Ice cream, 6 compartments 1 

Mellon — 

4-pint 11 

3-pint 18 

Opener, can * 1 

Organ: 

Small (Burger) .' : 1 

(Mainburg) 1 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 



1457 



Oven, bake: Quantity. 

CJoal 1 

Electric 5 

Pads, bed spring: 

Single 134 

Double 16 

Paddle: 

Wood 3 

Ice cream, iron 1 

Pans: 

Duat 4 

Copper, 27 by 24} inches 1 

Pudding, wmte enamel 14 

Frying, gfalvanized iron — 

Egg 25 

14J inches 1 

13J inches 4 

9 inches 12 

20 inches 3 

Pie, 9} inches 32 

Dish, white enamel, 14} by 10} inches 1 

Copper, braising — 

10} by 2} inches 1 

16 by 4 inches 3 

Roasting* — ^ 

24 by 16 by 3 inches 3 

24 by 16 by 6 inches » 1 

18 by 12 by 3 inches 1 

24 by 16 by 5 inches 12 

18 by 18 by 3 inches 4 

Dish, galvanized iron — 

16} by 3 inches 1 

21 by 6 inches 22 

huis: 

Steam press, enamel, 17 by 13 inches 2 

Bread, tin, 20 by 7 by 2 inches. 2 

Muffin, 12 compartments 24 

Oval 1 

Agate, 15 by 11 by 2 inches 2 

Enamel, 19 by 15} by 2 inches : 18 

Dish, 18 by 8 inches 2 

Roasting, 17 by 17 by 8 inches 4 

Picture: 

Gilt frame 15 

13 by 11 inches 3 

19 by 15 inches 2 

14 by 9 inches a 1 

17 by 17 inches 1 

19 by 13 inches 1 

Oval— 

19 by 13 inches 1 

14 by 13 inches 1 

20 by 15 inches 1 

Carved on slate 4 

112 by 9inches 1 

18 by 13 inches 1 

Wood frame — 

21 by 16 inches 1 

16 by 12 inches 1 

Pick, ice 1 

Piano: 

Baby Grand, Steinway A Sons 1 

HiM^t : 1 

Kohl 2 

Pillows: 

Fleece 115 

Eider down 52 



1458 SHIPPINO BOABD OFEa^ziojrs. 

FiUowB— Contmued. 

Feather— Qnntttj. 

Small 3 

Latge 207 

Sofa, damask 1 

Sofa 5 

Hair 56 

Tapestry, colored , 48 

Pins, rolling, wood: 

16 inchea 2 

12iiiche8 1 

PitchefB: 

Coffee, small 3 

Milk, china 6 

Cream, china ^ 2 

Crockery, 2 quarts 1 

China, 1 pint 1 

Agate, water, 1 gallon 9 

Porcelain, water, 1 gallon 1 

Glass 1 

Plates: 

Name, brass — 

lOi by 4 inches 12 

Music 3 

13 by 4 inches ^ 2 

6i by 1 inch 1 

2i by 6J inches 1 

Electric — 

Steel, 24 by 18 inches 2 

Oven 6 

Dinner, second class, 9) inches 105 

Soup, 9 inches 139 

Dessert, 6 inches 19 

Dinner, 10 inches 8 

Breakfast, 7J inches 79 

Vegetable^ 10 inches 2 

China, 10 inches 4 

Agate, 7 inches 163 

Chipped 106 

Soup, 9J inches 12 

Bread, china — 

7 inches 1 

6 inches 8 

Dinner, 15 inches HO 

Service — 

B. A B., 8 inches 64 

B. &B., 7 inches 15 

China, 13 inches 33 

Boup, first cabin, 9 inches 50 

(>hina service, 11 inches 33 

Platters: 

6 inches 2 

Enamel, 12J by -6 inches. 1 

Aluminum, 16 by 12 inches 7 

First class, 14 inches 5 

Second class, 16 inches 36 

China, oval — 

16 by 9 inches 9 

10 by 7 inches 11 

16 by 1 1 inches 2 

16 by 10 inches 1 

13 by 8i inches 1 

14 bv 10 inches 4 

Tin, oval, 17 by 14 inches 4 

China, first class cabin, 17 inches ^ 49 

9i inches 160 

Soup, second cabin, 9 inches 45 



SHIFPIirO BOABD (NPBB4TI0H8. 



1459 



Plattem— Continued . 
Meftt, second cabin — 

10 inches, china 

9 inch, china 

Pbts: 

China, 4 inches 

Stew, galvandxed iron — 

8 gallons 

1 gallon 

2galloni 

5eallonB 

6 by 10 inches 

Copper, side handles— 

16 by 10 by 2 inches 

1 5 by 8 inches 

Blue enamel, 1 sallon 

Coffee, nickel-plated, 2 quarts 

Copper, 2 gallons 

French fry, 15} inches 

Aluminum, side handles 

Galvanized iron, and Uds, 8} by 6 inches. . . 
Copper — 

10 by 6 inches 

11 by 5 inches I 

10 by 6^ inches 

8 by 5 inches ?. 

7i by 5 inches 

Yesetable, 14 b^r 12 by 6 inches 

Agate, 13 by 11 inches 

Coffee, white enamel, 2 quarts 

Tea, nickel-plated, 2 quarts 

Bean, cooking — 

6 by 6 inches 

5 by 5 inches , .• 

4 by 4 inches 

Stock— 

With faucet, 4 gallons 

Retinned, 20 gallons 

Blue enamel, oblong, 15 by 11 inches 

Enam^, IS by 6 indies 

Cooking, 8 by 0} inches. 

Batter and spout, 13 by 10} inches 

Stock (German)^ 

15} by 16J inches 

14 by 14 inches 

12} by 12} inches 

11 by 11 inches 

12 bv 12 inches 

10 by 10 inches 

9} by 9} inches. - 

8 by 8 inches 

9 bv 9 inches 

7} by 7} inches 

Poker, iron, 12 inches 

Portieres 



Quntltj. 
2 



6 by 4} feet. 
« by 5 feet.. 
Silk. 



Proof er, bread, 96 by 46 inches. 

Peeler, potato 

Quilts, Bilk 



1 
6 
2 



1 
6 
2 
6 
6 
2 

1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
4 
4 
4 
1 
1 
2 
Backs: 

Book, wood 48 

Wire and wood 66 

Toilet paper 29 

Paper.rTT. 4 

Toilet paper, wire and wood 3 



1460 SHIPPINQ BOARD OPESATIOHS. 

Racks— Continued. Qiwtky. 

Photo drying I 

Towel, met^ 3 

Pie, 9 shelveft, trftlvanized iron, 136 by 22 inchep 1 

Pan, iron 1 

Towel, white fpiard and white raetal 77 

T^etter — 

42 compartments 1 

1 12 com|>artment9 1 

Glass 1 

Plate, wood Ifi 

File, wood 2 

Ci lies and nickel 1 

Dish washing, galvanized iron .' 73 

Cup ...^ 12 

Parcel post. 35 compartment* 1 

Berth- 
Cord and wood 40 

Wood 19 

Serving, wood 11 

Pan- 
Galvanized iron 12 

Electric 261 

Nickel-plated 33 

Pan, wood. 1 

Book, built in 45 

Glass shelf 15 

Office 1 

Towel- 
Wood 10 

Derby 2 

Dirty-linen 2 

Galvanized iron, 6 shelves 3 

Ditty box, ealvanized iron - 5 

China, wood 1 



Clothes. 



8 

Rails, grab: 

Wood 4 

18-inch metal guard, white metal 105 

Metal guard, \niite metal, 8-inch 142 

Iron, 10-inch 3 

White enamel — 

8-inch 13 

lO-inch 12 

Range, galley: 

Coal, double, 8 fires each 4 

Electric (Simplex), 6,800-watt, 110-volt 1 

Rest, foot 1 

Rings, shower head 5 

Rod: 

Berth 171 

Door 175 

Port, brass 4 

Port 57 

Brass, coat hooks attached 6 

Curtain, brass 9 

Toilet, brass 3 

Curtain 72 

Door, brass 2 

Curtain, brass, 7-foot *. 4 

Bath 1 

31 

Hair 1 

Safe: 

Large 4 

Small, 11 by 9 by 4i inches 40 

Box for deposits, 83 by 34 by 23 inches 2 



SHIPPINO BOARD OPBBATIONS. 1461 

Safe — Con tin ued . 

Iron— QuMittty. 

14 by 11 inches ' 1 

8 J by 6 by 4i inches 3 

Tin. 14 by 10 by 3 inches 2 

Pay Department, United States Navy, 26 by 22 by 22 inches 1 

Scoop, flour 5 

Screen: 

Brass, fireplace 1 

Door 1 

Port 2 

Scales and weights 1 

Scales, bakers'. No. 2 1 

ScrapOT, dough 1 

Scoops, grocery 7 

Script, manifold (Standard machine) 1 

Seat: 

Bath- 
Folding 82 

White enamel 2 

Toilet 1 

Upholstered, leather 1 

Settee: 

Wicker 5 

Upholstered 59 

I^eather , 13 

Saucer: 
China — 

6-inch 96 

6-inoh, second class : 87 

Small ' 4 

Bhakers: 

Salt and pepper, glass 29 

Large 26 

Sugar, powdered : 1 

Shade: 

Lamp, silk 91 

Post 89 

Roller 3 

Sharpener, pencil 2 

Shovel: 

Coal 1 

Fire 1 

Shelves: 

Oven, electric, 36 by 27 inches 9 

Book, wood 19 

Built in 3 

Drain — 

Wood 1 

Galvanized iron 6 

Glass and brass fixture 6 

White metal guards 20 

Wall, wood 27 

Shower: 
Head- 
Porcelain 37 

Metal 61 

Needle 1 

Seat 1 

Sieve, flouc, tin, 22-inch .- 1 

Sink: 

Porcelain 4 

Galvanized iron 11 

White enamel, 30 by 20 inches 8 

Brasfl and copper 1 

Enamel and iron, double 1 

Dideboard 3 



1462 SHIFPIKO BOABD 0FEBATI0H8. 

Skimmer: 

14 by 6 inches 1 

Galvanized iion — 

4^ inch t 

e^inch 4 

7iinch 4 

2Jinch 1 

8 inch t 

6 inch 1 

Slicer. galvanized iron 2 

S(tfa, leather S 

BITZ-CARLTON. 

Silverware: 

Crackers, nut 25 

Gompots, fruit — 

10 by 4 inches 9 

8 by 7 inches 2 

Dish, cake, 8 by 2 inches 4 

Deepe, oblong and covers — 

10 by 7J Inches 2 

12 by 8i inches 4 

Forks — 

Oyster 17 

Dining 455 

Fish 63 

DesBOTt IW 

Fruit 40 

Knivee— 

Fruit ^ 53 

Butter 7& 

Steel 244 

Dessert 217 

Ladles, 4-indi I 

Platters, meat — 

IS-inch 8 

16-inch 4 

Spoons — 

Dessert 60 

Soup 136 

Trays, bread, 12-inch ^ 

FIB8T-CLAB8 CABIN. 

Boats, sauce 108 

Bowls, sugar 1 

Deeps, vegetable, round — 

81-inch 19 

8-inch 101 

Forks — 

Oyster 341 

Fwh 112 

PicUe 25 

Dessert 246 

Dinner 177 

Flats- 
Meat, 14J-inch 281 

Meat, 16i-inch 38 

Meat, 10-inch 13 

Meat, lOJ-inch .^.... 281 

Holders, menu 285 

Knives — 

Butter 12 

Fish 584 

Fruit 209 

Steel , dinner 744 






SHTPPINQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 1468 

BOvenrwre— Continued. 



Qtumtity. 

8oup, 3^-inch 14 

Soup, 3-inch 30 

Picks, nut 677 

PotB, iiot water and coven 8 

Flates, cake — 

12-inch 4 

Hot, 8-inch 168 

Pitchere, cream 13 

Tonga, sugar 204 

Trays, bread, llf-inch 118 

Spoons- 
Soup ; 12 

Dessert 42 

Sunr 10 

Coffee 3 

Second-class cabin — 

Bowls, sugar, no covers, 3)-inch 4 

Bowls, sugar, no covers, 3-inch 7 

Compots, 8} by 2 J inches 27 

Forks, dessert. 117 

Koives, steel, dinner 836 

Knives, Band B 184 

Ladles, 3i-inch. 2 

Platters- 
Meat, 16-inch 56 

Meat, 15-inch 48 

Meat, 10}-inch 80 

Meat, Of-inch 66 

Sifters, sugar. 2 

Spoons- 
Soup 21 

Coffee 21 

Tongs 33 

Vase, flower, 12-inclL 1 

Very deeps, lO^inch. 16 

Very deeps, 9-inch. 11 

RITZ-CABLTON — BUPPLSMBNTART. 

Oasserole, 8i-inch. 2 

mST CLA88. 

Dish, au gratin and covers. 4 

H'oiB S'orvis. 1 

Knives, steel, dessert 90 

SBCOND CLAM. 

Ice cream, & P 2 

Knives, steel, broken 19 

Spoons— 

G. 1 8 

Tea 9 

Table 2 

Basting, G. I., 14-inch 17 

Tea, crew 76 

Table, crew 78 

>rayer, disinfectant 3 

>ring8, bed 640 

Springs, bed, double 1 

Squeezer, lemon, ^lass. 1 1 

Squeezer, lemon, iron 1 

Stenchion, pipe, bunk upright. 395 



1464 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 

Stand: Quantity. 

Jardiniere, wicker 1 

Wood, 26 by 20 by 12 inches 1 

Ink 4 

Medicine : I 

Flower, wicker 1 

Night, giaas top 2 

Do 207 

Built-in, 16 by 14 inches 1 

Night, built-in 4 

Pitcher, N. P 1 

Coffee, metal top, 6 by 3 by 2 feet 1 

Medicine, 19 by 7 by IJ inches 1 

Mucilage 1 

Ironing board 1 

Rubber 2 

Stanchion, bunk, pipe, cross W7 

Statute, bronze 1 

Steamer: 

52 by 27 by 20 inches 1 

Jackets, 80 gallons (German) 20 

Jackets, 20 gallons (Alum Amerie) 2 

Vegetable, with cover, 58 by 32 by 21 inches '. 6 

Jacket, enamel (German) 6 

Stool: 

Foot, leather 1 

Cane top 3 

Camp 40 

Strainers: 

Fish, wire 1 

Vegetable, G. I., 14-inch 1 

Sweeper, carpet 2 

Table: 

Folding 10 

Steam (imperial suite) 33 by 18 by 5 inches 1 

Steam (pressroom) 7 

Smoking-room, third class 1 

Round, 3 legs, 21-inch 1 

Writing, inlaid, 80 by 25 inches 1 

Plain 7 

Dining, round, 37-inch 6 

Writing, double 1 

Fiber, 94 by 31 inches 4 

Fiber, 36 by 23 inches 6 

Felt top, 28 by 28 inches 2 

Fiber top, 48 by 46 by 42 inches 1 

Flat^ brass, 4 1 by 31 inches 1 

Wood, 36 by 24 inches 2 

Fiber top, 34 by 30 by 22inches 2 

Side, 9 compartments 1 

Flat base, 60 by 29 by 28 inches 1 

Round, 36 inch 1 

Round, 31-inch 2 

Fiber top, 58 by 25 by 24 inches 1 

Wall, glass top, folding 1 

Round , 21-inch 13 

Oval, 31 bjr 19i inches 43 

Round, 23-inch 4 

Sewing, on casters 1 

Inlaid, glass, 21-inch 3 

Inlaid, glass, 23-inch 1 

29 by 20 inches, iron legs 4 

Round, ^lass top, 31-indi 3 

Flower, mlaid, 30 by 16 inches 1 

Checker, 28 by 28 inches 1 

Stand, fern, 14-inch 7 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1465 

l^ble->Contiiiued. Qoanttty. 

Oval,36by30by25 inches 1 

Triangle, 24 by 19 inches 2 

Glass top, 19-inch 1 

Inlaid, tancy, 30 by 16J inches *. 1 

Mess, iron l^s 3 

Fiber top, 31 by 14 inches 13 

Dressing, 31 by 13 inches 1 

Dressing, 31 by 8 inches 2 

Round , 2 8-inch 1 

Serving, round, 28-inch 3 

Serving, oblong 1 

Oval, 37 by 29i by 25J inches 3 

Fiber top , 76 by 36 inches 1 

Oval, 35 by 23 inches 16 

Oval, 43J by 29 inches 1 

Round, 44-inch : 1 

Fiber top, 96 by 36 inches 10 

Fiber top, 97 by 31i inches 2 

Fiber top, 74 by 31i inches 2 

Fiber top, 31i by 29i by 19 inches 2 

Fiber top, 33 by 19i inches 1 

Folding, wood legs 67 

Fiber top, 29 by 123J inches 7 

Fiber top, 96 by 45 inches. : 2 

Oval, 29by27i 1 

Oval, fiber top, 37 by 24 inches 2 

Oval, fiber top, 39 by 27 inches 1 

Wood, 39 by 23 by 17 inches 1 

Fiber top, 82 by 36 inches 1 

Dining, round, 62-inch 1 

Dining, round, 41-inch 6 

Dining, round, 46J-inch 2 

Dining, round, 37-inch 19 

Dining — 

Round, 48-inch 4 

Round, 31-inch 1 

Wood, round, 31J by 19J inches 1 

Dining — 

8by2f feet 2 

6 by 2 } feet 1 

4 by 2f feet 4 

2Jby2ifeet 1 

Wood— 

120 by 30 by 27 inches 1 

30 by 30 by 3 inches 1 

27 by 26 by 18 inches 1 

Massage, glass, 78 by 32 inches 1 

Drop. 24 by 12 inches I 

Butcher, 32 by 30 by 25 inches 1 

Dressing, fiber top, 30 by 30 by 22 inches 2 

Pantry, dress, metal top and galvanized iron 19 

Round, glass top, 23-inch 1 

Diagonal, fiber top, 28-inch 1 

Fiber top, 31 by 19 inches 1 

Pantry, dressing, galvanized iron 6 

Writing, attached to bulkhead 3 

Tank: 

Tin, wardrobe 1 

Flush 1 

Telephone, inside 131 

Tell-tale, brass 1 

Thermiscope, brass, and cartridges 1 

Thermometer: 

Glass 1 

White metal 68 

177068— 20— PT 4 15 



1466 SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 

Qna&titj. 

Tfaennometer, tin 2 

Tormentor, large, 36-inch 1 

Tongs — 

Electric, curling •. 1 

Ice, iron 8 

Trays: 

Nickel-plated, 16 by 13 inches 41 

Serving bedroom , 25 

Bulkhead attached to 25 

Tin, serving, 17 by 14 inches 108 

Enamel, steam press 15 

Bus boy, 40 by 30 by 18 inches 5 

Fiber, 22 by 17 inches 1 

White enamel, 18 by 14 inches 32 

Bronze, ash , 2 

Turiners: 

Nickel-plated, 13-inch, third class 1 

Nickel-plated, 13-inch, first class 1 

White enamel, U. S. M. Standard, 14 by 10 inches .•. 22 

Tyi)ewriter: 

Underwood, No. 1838222 1 

5 Underwood , No . 992508 1 

5 Underwood, No. 992656 1 

3 Underwood, No. 51010 1 

4 Underwood , No. 1127602 1 

5 Underwood , No. 992273 1 

Monarch, No. 4243 1 

5 Underwood , No. 992566 1 

Urns: 

Coffee, copper, 30-gallon 2 

Coffee, copper, 20-gallon 1 

Coffee, nickel-plated, 20-gallon 3 

Coffee, nickel-plated, 100 liter 1 

Coffee, nickel-plated, 15-gallon 1 

Water, copper 1 

Water, nickel-plated, 15-gallon 1 

Urinals: 

Water 14 

Galvanized iron 6 

W^ardrobe: 

Single, no mirror 174 

Single, with mirror 161 

Double, with mirror. 73 

Double, no mirror 39 

Glass door, single 8 

Washbasin, galvanized iron 1 

Washstand: 

Galvanized iron and enamel 4 

Porcelain 8 

Single, metal guard 153 

Single, folding 55 

Double, folding 10 

Double, with mirror 85 

Double, no mirror 1 

Dresser and desk 30 

Single, porcelain 39 

Bulkhead attached to 87 

Enamel, hand, 14-inch 1 

15 by 15 inch 1 

SUPPLEMENTARY STEWARD'S DEPARTMENT. 

Bells, dinner, brass 1 

Case, clock, wood 2 

Chambers, bedroom 5 

Hatchet 1 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1467 

Hood, ealley, range — Qaintity. 

92 by 156 inches 2 

98 by 86 inches 1 

Hooks — 

Clothes, single 651 

Clothes, double 48 

File, small, N. P 21 

Door 183 

Clothes, triple 616 

Bale 2 

Butchers, meat 62 

Bath 940 

Door rod 945 

Triple coat, swivel 210 

Triple, small 180 

Towel 637 

Shower 7 

Port rod 191 

Curtain 344 

Hose, galley — 

1-inch feet. . 32 

2-inch feet.. 5 

Machines — 

\ng. 

Dough mixer, New Era 3 

Dish washing, Niagara 2 

Adding and stand, Burroughs 362430 1 

Potato peeling 3 

Cutter, vegetable , 2 

Cake mixing, German 1 

Ice cream freezing and motor 1 

Hand meat grinding: 1 

Electric bread cutting 1 

Electric coffee grinding 1 

Electric meat grinding 2 

Dish wash, Votex 1 



Knife, cleaning , 1 



Potato 2 

Wood 3 feet 9 inches 1 

Wood 3 feet 6 inches 1 

Wood 18 inches 1 

Mat, door 20 

Mattresses, hair 694 

Piano, inlaid. Chapel 1 

Stamps, rubber 2 

ToiletB 110 

Toilets, G. I., wood seat 3 

Troughs, G. I., wash room 5 

Trucks, hand 2 

Troughs, dough — 

90 by 30 by 33 inches 2 

48 by 30 by 33 inches, 4 legs and casters 1 

47 by 49 bv 33 inches, 4 legs and casters 1 

37 by 86 by 31 inches 1 

36 by 33 by 27 inches on casters 1 

Tube, speaking 1 

Tube— 

G. I., 40 gallons 7 

Bath 2a 

Twine balls 2 

Urns — 

Coffee, N. P., 10 gallons I 

Water, copper 1 

Water, copper, 5 gallons ' 1 

Whips, wire, French, 16 inches 9» 



1468 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS, 

steward's department — UNEN. 

Aprons: Quantity. 

Butcher, colored 13 

Cooks, blue 14 

Cooks, white 17 

Bags, linen, canvas 135 

Cloths: 

Messroom 6 

Table, linen — 

59 by 59 inches. No. 150 360 

73 by 64 inches. No. 180 120 

136 by 64 inches. No. 360 112 

178 by 64 inches. No. 450 63 

148 by 102 inches, No. 370 33 

90 by 88 inches. No. 230 9 

82 by 82 inches, No. 2 10 7 

67 by 67 inches, No. 170 20 

67 by «7 inches, No. 175 23 

73 by 68 inches 3 

134 by 72 inches 1 

157 by 64 inches 1 

150 by 72 inches 1 

Coats, waiter, white 64 

Counterpanes: 

Colored 161 

White, firet class, 84 by 72 inches 129 

White, M. B., U. S.N 4 

Covers: 

Pillow- 
Red check 122 

Black check 3 

Cotton 4 

23 by 19 inches 151 

Mattress — 

Colored, firemen 1447 

WTiite, double 60 

White, single 5 

Mats, Turkish bath 8 

Napkins, white linen: 

19 by 19 inches 782 

28 by 28 inches 340 

Rollers, linen, white 181 

Pockets, wall j 8 

Sheets: 

Linen — 

107 by 64 inches 366 

90 by 50 inches.... 120 

80 by 55 inches 120 

103 by 66 inches, lettered 20 

82 by 76 inches 93 

96 by 72 inches 21 

84 by 28 inches 10 

98 by 74 inches, letter 235 

104 by 64 inches, letter U 229 

104 by 64 inches, letter GR .- 107 

90 by 50 inches, letter GK * 166 

100 by 46 inches 22 

Cotton — 

86 by 48 inches, blue and red stripes 1054 

88 by 66 inches, American Ill 

76 by 54 Inches, American 22 

Slips: 

Pillow- 
Linen — 

32 by 18 inches 464 

36 by 30 inches 366 

31 by 14 inches 553 



SHIPPIXO BOASD OPEBATIONS. 



1469 



Slipft-^ontinued . 

Pillow — Gontinu ed . 

Linen — Continued. Quantity. 

42 by 15 inches 143 

18 by 20 inches 487 

37 by 28 inches 28 

38 by 30 inches 228 

30 by 15 inches 79 

44 by 14 inches 3 

28 by 20 inches Ill 

Cotton — 

32 by 18 inches 267 

33 by 19 inches, American 114 

36 by 18 inches 150 

Towels: 

Chamber — 

33 by 18 inches 106 

40 by 23 inches 759 

Cotton, 32 by 16 inches 150 

Glass 2 



Linen — 

38 by 18 inches, red and blue border. 

42 by 25 inches 

38 by 24 inches, red border 

Pantry, white 

Turkish— 



42 by 18 inches. 
Towels, Turkish— 

48 by 31 inches. 
72 by 64 inches. 
74 by 50 inches. 



PRINTING PRESS AND EQUIPMENT. 

Board: 

Bristol, 25J by 22J inches pounds. . 

Tool, 26 by 21 by 1 inch 

Fold, wood — 

23 by 14 by 1 inch 

15 by 12 by 1 inch 

BruB, junk pounds. . 

Bars, metal, BteTeotyx>e do 

Belting, leather, 2-inch feet . . 

Brush, type, clean: 

35^ inches 

5 inches 

Cabinet: 

Type, Benzing, German oak, 45 by 41 by 22 inches 

Furniture, Hamilton, oak, 30 by 11 by 9 inches ^. . 

Case: 

Right pack, 23 by 16 by 9i inches 

Right Hamilton, 16 by 14i by 10 inches 

Wood, furniture, Hamilton, 31 by lOi inches 

Chisel, chipping, 5-inch 

Cutter, paper, hand, Oswego No. 2398, 19-inche6 

Cloth, emery: 

Hi by 9 inches. No. 1110 sheets. . 

H by 8} inches, fine • do 

Dipper, inetal 

Dtawerg, t3rpe, wood, 33 by 17 by 2 inches 

Figures: 

Numeral — 

5-line 

10-line 

15-line 

20-line 

Lead, Century Expanded, 8 point font. . 



109 

1224 

49 

1 

92 

101 

115 

3 



250 
1 

2 
1 

15 
190 

10 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

12 
8 
3 
9 



1470 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIOKS. 

Furniture: 

Wood — Quantity. 

10-line feet. 12 

15-line do . . . 8 

20-line do. . . 17 

25-line do... 17 

30-line do... 22 

40-line do. . . 30 

50-line do. . . 46 

60-line do. . . 78 

Iron — 

50-line pounds. 25 

Aesortcd do... 325 

Funnel, pint 1 

Galley, type, iron: 

18 by 5i by 3} inches 7 

ITiby 13 inches 2 

18 by 5 inches 1 

12i by 9 inches 1 

13 by 9 inches 1 

16 by 11 inches 1 

11} by 7i inches 2 

Gasoline gallons . 1 

Guard, wire mesh: 

Rail, 41 by 31 inches 1 

On galvanized-iron frame, 46 by 31 inches 1 

Hair-line rule, brass, 25 feet 1 

Heater, electric, 20 by 10 by 8 inches 1 

Ink, printing: 

Leavy, carmine, tubes pounds. 20 

Leavy, blue, tubes do. . . 5 

Leavy, black, tubes do . . . 5 

Hanson, white, tubes do 1 

Sig Ulliman, Malone blue do 1 

Sig Ulliman, black do. . . J 

Iron, junk do 25 

Key, quoin 3 

Keystone, (^uoin, pair 40 

Kempe quoin, patent 4 

Knife, ink 1 

Linotype machine, complete, lntertyi)e No. 2136, electric 1 

Mucilage hundredweight- 1 

Paper: 

White, super, 8 by 6i inches sheets. 500 

White, super, 8 by 5 J inches do 500 

Band primoues. punched, lOJ by 8 inches do. . . 500 

Pand, coarse, 11 by 9 inches do. . . 10 

White, super, waste strips, 17 by 4 inches pounds. 70 

White, super, wa§te strips, 16 by 3 inches sheets. 2, 500 

White, super, waste strips, 9 by 4 inches do. . . 2, 500 

Mat, gray, 22 by 16 inches do... 300 

White, Lude watermark, 9i by 8 inches do. . . 300 

Writing, Hamburg A merica Line 500 

Oil tympan, 24 by 21 inches do ... 50 

Cover — 

Purguoise blue finish 

ranar>' color, 25 bv 22 inches sheet*. 100 

Pink, 14i by 22 inches do. . . 200 

Salmon, 25 by 21 inches do. . . 500 

Dark blue, 25 by 21 inches do. . . 300 

Buef, 25 by 21 inches do... 300 

Paste, Arobel pints. 2 

Press, job. Universal type, Benzing: 

20} by 1 4 inches 1 

Individual motor attached, Conz type K 3/4, 24346, 110 volt, 64 amperes. 1 
Press chase: 

Iron, 21 by 17 inches 4 

Iron, 20 by 16^ inches 5 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1471 

Press cha8e--Oontmued. Quantity. 

Job, 22 by 1 7 inchee • 10 

Job, 17 by 13 inches 3 

Poker, iron, 29-iQch 1 

Quads: 

I^ead, 8-point, assorted pounds. . 26i 

I.iead, assorted do 5 

Tjrpewriter, 8-point do. ... 10 

Rack: 

Paper — 

26 by 25 inches, wood 1 

30 by 29 inches, wood 1 

^ 49 by 35 by 18 inches, wood 1 

Maho^ny, 24 by 8 by 2J inches 1 

Sheet, wood. 21 by 15 by 1 inch ^ 1 

Tool and brackets, 16 by 11 bv 6| inches 1 

Furniture. 31 by 12 by 9i incnes, complete 1 

Oak wood, right, 30 by 15 by 5 inches 1 

Wood, 39 by 13 by 8 inches, 9 compartments 1 

Railing, brass 2-inch, pipe 45 inches I 

Reglets: 

Wood feet. . 600 

Wood, 10 fine do 5 

Rope, i-inch do 10 

Rollers: 

Feed , coarse 2 

Angle .• 4 

Feed, steel 2 

Rack, wood, 52 by 24 by 3 inches 1 

Distributing for press , 6 

Rule, brass edge, 3 feet 1 

Screw-driver, 13-inch 1 

Screen, safety, wire mesh, 50 by 31 inches 1 

Shelf, wood: 

. 80 by 49 by 13 inches 1 

50by 22by Hnch 1 

60 by 20 bv 1 inch 1 

13 by 12 by 6 inches 1 

Sliisp, lead, 8-point pounds. . 45 

Stretchers: 

Wire, 500 to core, J-inch cores 145 

Wire machine, Boston, stvle D 1 

Stone, compositor's. 55 by 36 by 19i inches 1 

Stand, compositor's, 65 by 53 by 34 inches 1 

Spaces, lead: 

36-point pounds. . 10 

8-point, assorted do 9 

Quads, 6-point do 5 

Supports, wood, 35 by 33 inches 1 

Switches, button, porcelain 2 

Tacks, copper, 1-inch pounds . . i 

Tnimmers, slug 1 

Type: 

Lead- 
Cheltenham bold — 

8-point pounds . . 60 

10-point do 40 

24-point do 15 

8-point, italic do 50 

lO^point, italic do 25 

12-point, italic do 30 

30-point, italic do 15 

36-point, italic do 100 

48-point, italic do 28 

6-point, italic do 5 

German do 70 



1472 SHIPPINQ DOAED OPBRATIOHS. 

Type — Contin u ed . 
Le»d— Con tin ued . 

Century— Qi 

8-point, ilAlic do 

6-point, italic do 

4- point, itaiir... do 

5-poirt, italic do 

T-poiot do 

8-point do 

9-point do 

lO-point do 

11-poiut do 

12-poLnt do 

l^point do 

14-point do 

IG-point do 

8-point, roman do 

6-point da 

Underwood, used, thrown in do 

Century- 
Cape, Toman, S-point do 

S-point, italic, font 

Small cape, romon, 8-point, font 

Small caps, roman, 8-point pounds.. 

Enpanded, 8-point, font 

Metal, C-entiiry, Bterootvpe ^ ponndn.. 

Lead— Cheltenham , bold do 

Century, italic, 8-point do 

Typewriter do 

Century, lon-er caw set-ups, 8-point do 

Lower case, caps, italic— 

6-point do 

8-point do 

Old English— 

8-point do 

6-point do. — 

Century, lownr rase, caps, 8-point do 

Decorating border- - 

4-point do 

Assorted do 

Century- 
All raps, italic, 10-point do 

6-point do 

Cheltenham bold, 15-point do 

Underwood , typewriter, 12-point do 

Century- 
Expanded, 8-point do 

Expanded, snuiU caps, 6-point do 

17-point do 

18-point do 

19-point do 

20-point /. /. .' do . . 

21-point do 



;, 12-ipoint do 

inded, 12-p(nnt do 

am bold, 12-point do 



kpe, font 

per and lower, 15 lower c<ase font. . 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIOKS. 1473 

ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Quantity. 

Adapten, fuse plug, 90 amperes 158 

Alarm: 

Fire, brass — 

3 by 5 by 5 inches -■ 1 

4 by 4 inches 2 

Icebei*r, brass, 7 by 10 by 14 inches 1 

Electric, brass — 

Forward 1 

Aft 1 

Siren 1 

Amplifier: 

2 steps, De Forest type 1 

3 Btep6,Westinghouse Electric Co., C-W^6A 1 

Ammonia quarts. . 3 

Armatures: 

Direct crurrent. S. & S. type — 

7 b V 12 inches i 2 

1 J by 3 inches 1 

Altematmg current, S. A S. type — 

2 by 2} inches 1 

2i by 4 inches 1 

Motor, S. & S. type — 

6 by 10 inches 1 

5 by 9i inches 1 

3 by 8i inches 2 

9 by 14 inches 3 

6 by 14 inches 1 

8 by 14 inches 1 

4i by 7 inches 2 

8by20inches 4 

9 b V 26 inches 1 

13 by 20 inches 1 

8 by 26 inches 1 

19 by 26 inches 1 

8 by 18 inches 2 

1 3 by 28 inches 1 

5 by 11 inches 3 

5 by 13 inches 1 

Main generator, No. 288 1 

Axe, fire 2 

Base: 

Fuse, composition 353 

Mogul 2 

Fuse, porcelain, 10 amperes 23 

Wood, round, 5J by 8 inches 9 

Lamp, brass 1 

Basket: 

Waste- 
Fiber 1 

Wicker, 30-inch 1 

Wicker, small 1 

Lamp, wicker, 4 by 9 by 14 inches 2 

Bag, canvas, 14-inch 1 

Battery: 

Set,Bradio 1 

Storage — 

.Dry, 4 cells 14 

Dry, 2 cells 2 

140 amperes, Exide, 4-cell 14 

40 amperes. Exide — 

4-cell 2 

5-cell 2 

3-cell 1 

16-cell 8 

6-cell 4 



1474 SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 

Battery — Continued . 
Storafse — Continued . 

Ediaon — Quantitf. 

5^ell 1 

6-cell 7 

140 amperes, Navy, S-cell 18 

Navy special — 

le-cell 8 

5-cen 4 

6-cell 4 

Bearinfi^s, brass, IJ by li inches 16 

Bell, electric: 

Covy type 1 

Nickel-plated, 3-inch 8 

Watch with switch box 2 

Phone » 

Brass I 

Brass, 4 by 8 inches 2 

Belting, leather: 

l-mch, 2feet 1 

IJ-inch, 5 feet 1 

3-inch, 44 feet 1 

2-inch, 40 feet 1 

Bench work, wood : 

3 doors, 1 locker, 2 by 14 feet I 

14 compartments, 4 by 4 by 6 feet 1 

Galvanized-iron top, 6 drawers, 30 by 30 inches by 6 feet 1 

3 compartments, 4 doors, 3 by 3 by 18 feet 1 

4 compartments, 19 by 3iS by 54 inches 1 

2 by 22 inches by 7 feet 1 

1 by 21 by 63 inches 1 

2 by 5 feet by 2 inches 1 

Galvanized-iron, nickel-plated top, 4 drawers, 2 shelves, 30 by 50 by 

60 inches 1 

35 shelves, 1 drawer, 22 by 36 by 40 inches 1 

Bin, galvanized-iron, 2 by 8 feet 1 

Blades: 

Hacksaw 13 

For turbine, brass 2 

Block: 

Fuse, 30 amperes 1 

Cut-out, porcelain 80 

Board: 

Switch — 

Wood, 14 by 18 inches 1 

Westinghouse Electric Co., C. W. 928 type 2 

Metropolitan — 

511-28 1 

12 by 38 by 40 inches 1 

Galvanized-iron — 

3 by 30 by 45 inches 1 

3 by 30 by 41 inches 1 

Battery, oak, 4 by 9J by 12 inches 1 

Testing — 

Slate, 1 by 17i by 37 inches 1 

Wood— 

1 by 16 by 16 inches 1 

1 by 15 by 18 inches 1 

1 by 6 by 10 inches 1 

1 by 11 by 28 inches 1 

1 by 14 by 20 inches 1 

1 by 12 by 20 inches 1 

1 by 15J by 24 inches : 1 

Ibv 18 by 18 inches 1 

15 lamps 3 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1475 

Board — Continued . 

Teeting^Con tinned . 

Compoeition— Quantity. 

22i by 26J inches 1 

17 by 24 inches J 

Relay, 12 coils ] 

Oak, cloth covered, 20 by 25 inches J 

Sounding, wood, 7 by 11 inches 1 

Jumper wood 3 

Tableau, 17 indicators, 48 by 52 inches 1 

Blocks, anvil, 2f by 3 inches 14 

Block and fall, 2 pulleys 1 

Blower, exhaust, 4 horsepower 1 

Bolts: 

Stud, 1 b)r 41 inches 12 

Stove, -j^ inch pounds. . 4 

Stove, assorted do 24 

Steel do.... 1 

Brass, ^ inch do 2 

Brass, assorted do 40 

Brass 102 

f -inch 131 

Iron 92 

Box: 

Tool- 
Galvanized iron, 6 by 10 by 24 inches 1 

Oak, 6 by 12 by 24 inches 1 

Oak, 16 by 21 by 33 inches 1 

Oak, 17 by 18 by 30 inches 1 

Mahogany, 10 by 20 by 20 inches 1 

Oak, 8 by 9 by 12 inches 1 

Oak, 7 by 13 by 16 inches 1 

Oak, 6 by 7 by 9 inches 1 

Oak, 14 by 19 by 34 inches. . t 1 

Galvanized iron, 8 by 18 by 30 inches 1 

Galvanized iron, 13 by 24 by 35 inches 1 

Junction — 
Brass — 

3-wav — 

ii by 2i inches 156 

IJ by 4i by 5 inches 4 

2 J by 5 oy 7 inches 1 

2i by 3i by 5 inches 3 

3 Dy 5 by 10 inches 1 

3 by 3 by 5J inches 3 

3 by 6i by 8 inches 1 

4-way — 

3 by 4 by 8 inches 5 

4 by 9 by 10 inches 55 

2-way, 2 by 5 by 4i inches 10 

Iron, 2-way, 2 J by 44 inches, round 8 

Brass — 

5-way, 4 J by 8 by 12 inches 1 

9-way, 2J by 5J by 8J inches 1 

10-way, 2i by 7 by 9i inches 1 

1-way • 64 

Iron, 1-way 86 

Mahogany, 3 by 13 by 17 inches I 

Distributing — 

Galvanized iron — 

2 by 6 by 9 inches 1 

4 by 7 by 12 inches 1 

3 by 8 by 12 inches 3 

4iby 9}by lOi inches 2 

And cover, galvanized iron, 4 by 16 by 24 inches 1 

2 covers, 3 compartments, 3J by 9J by 12J inches 1 

Waterproof 12 



1476 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 



Box — ^Gontinued. 

Safety, bni»— QuanUty. 

4 by 7 by 11 inches 1 

4i by 10 by 18 inches 1 

4 by 9 by 11 inches 3 

Control detector, De Forest type, anchor 1 

Controller — 

6 by 6 by 7 inches 1 

Automatic, brass, 7 by 7 by 14 inches 1 

Starting — 

8. & S. type — 

7.5 horsepower 10 

5.5 horsepower 1 

3.2 horsepower 1 

2.8 horsepower 1 

10 horsepDWer 19 

30 horsepower 4 

80 amperes 2 

30 amperes ■... 4 

10 amperes 2 

5 amperes 1 

12 horsepower 2 

1 horsepower 4 

6 horsepower 23 

4.6 horsepower 3 

0.9 horsepower 1 

20 ohms 4 

80 ohms 3 

7 by 9 by 12i inches 3 

7 by 10 by 13 inches 3 

5 by 7 by 12i inches 1 

6 by 12 by 15i inches 1 

8 by 8J by 13 inches 1 

4i by 10 by 14 inches 2 

7 by 7 by 12 inches 2 

7 by 7 by 10 inches 2 

7 by 13 by 13 inches 2 

6 by 7 by 13 inches 1 

7 by 7 by 20 inches 2 

6 by 13 by 15 inches 2 

A. E. G., 3 horsepower 1 

Cutler & Hammer — 

3 horsepower 2 

8 amperes 5 

12 amperes 6 

20 amperes 1 

Switch — 
Brass — 

4 by 16 by 6 inches 1 

2 by 2i by ^ inches 6 

2i by 3 by 6 inches 1 

5 by 6 by 12 inches 5 

2J by 3i by 4* inches 1 

14 by 21 by 36 inches 4 

Wood. 8 by 8i by 18 inches 1 

Porcelain, 4 by 5 by 14 inches 1 

Nickel-plated, 4-way 6 

2-way, 4 horsepower 1 

Controller, 110 volts, 60 amperes 1 

Relay — 

48 coils, 7 by 15 by 25 inches 2 

3 by 5 by 8J inches 1 

4 by 6 by 8i inches 1 

Detector, nickel plated, 2J by ^ inches 2 



SHIPPING BOABD OPEEATIOKS. 1477 

Box — C!oiitinued . 
Fufle— 

Brass — Quantity. 

2J inches 71 

3 inches 50 

5 inches • 65 

7 by 10 by 20 inches 2 

5 by 5 by 7 inches 3 

8 by 15 by 16 inches 19 

And cover, 7 by 16 by 33 inches 2 

4 b^ 4 by 5 inches 6 

Galvanized iron — 

3i by 9i by 15i inches , 3 

4 by 5 by 14 inches 2 

4 by 7 by 13 inches 1 

3 by 5 by 14 inches 9 

4 by 11 by 19 inches 1 

6 by 11 by 19 inches 1 

5 by 7 by 17 inches 1 

Waterproof, 6 by 10 b^ 14 inches 1 

Insulation, 2 by 4J by 6J inches 1 

Resistance, 20 ohms .• 1 

Terminal, porcelain, 2 by 3 by 5 inches 1 

Waterproof, 2 bells, 4 by 5 by 20 inches , 1 

Fire alarm 3 

Bushing, brass } inch 1 

Telephone — 

Brass, 2J by 8 by 10 inches 2 

Bell American 1 

W. E. Co., waterproof 4 

Cutout — 

8 by 12 by 24 inches 2 

4 by 5 by 6 inches 10 

4i by 6 by 6 inches 1 

4 by 6 by 8i inches 1 

Testing, 4 dry cells 1 

Connecting — 

Galvanized iron 42 

Cory type 1 

Navy typje - 1 

Cross connection. 8 by 5J by 6 inches 1 

Indicator, brass front, 7 by 4i by 4i inches 1 

Annunciator — 
Mahogany — 

With §las8 front coils only, 8 by 14^ by 25 inches 1 

30 indicators, 5 by 10 by 15 inches 2 

With glass front — 

27 indicators, 7 by 21 by 28 inches 1 

20 indicators, 8 by 10 by 13 inches 2 

8 indicators, 6 by 7 by 15 inches 2 

30 indicators, 9i by lOJ by 18 inches 1 

40 indicators, 8 by 9i by 13 inches 1 

5 indicators, 2 by ^ by 15 inches 1 

30 indicators, lOi by 18 by 19 inches 1 

20 indicators, 7} by 10 by 18 inches 1 

Brass — 

50 indicators, 7 by 11 by 19 inches 10 

50 indicators, 7 by 10 by 14 inches 4 

27 indicators, 7 by 20 by 28 inches 1 

6 indicators, 5 by 10 by 18 inches 4 

Waterproof, 5 indicators, 4J by 7 by 18 inches 1 

20 drop male and female 29 

Motor, reversible, complete 1 

Signal, galvanized iron, complete, 4 by 6 by 10 inches 1 

Starting (S. & S.)— 

230 amperes 5 

192 amperes 2 



1478 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Box — Continued. 

Startinj? (S. A S.)— Continued. QmurtltT. 

142 amperea 2 

43 horsepower 1 

2i amperes 2 

Relay — 

2 coils 1 

6 coils... 1 

Indicator for temperature, 40 indicators, galvanized iron, 3 by 14 by 15 

inches 1 

Indicator, galvanized iron, 10 indicators, 6 by 6 by 15 inches 1 

Junction — 

6 by 6i by 16 inches, 6-way 1 

6-wiy 4 

4 inches round, 4-way 1(^ 

Switch, galvanized iron, 5 by 7 by 13 inches 15 

13- way, 5 by 11 by 15 inches 1 

13-way, 5 by lOby 14 inches 1 

11-way, 5 by 14 by 17 inches 1 

9-way, 4J by 10 by 16 inches 1 

6-way, 5 by 12 by 14 inches 1 

4-way, 3 by 6 by 9 inches I 

3- way, 4 by 7 by 11 inches 1 

Bracket: 

Shelf, galvanized iron, 22 inches 1 

lAmp, brass — 

Single » 107 

Triple 83 

Gilded double 3 

Iron, 2 bv 7 inches Id 

Shelf, galvanized iron, 2 by 13 by 15 inches 22* 

Candle, porcelain 24 

Breaker: 

Circuit — * 

8i by 41 by 5J inches 6 

Sundt type, 100 amperes 2* 

Solenoid 2" 

Brooms, com 3 

Brush: 

Armature 1 

Dust » 

Paint, 5 inches 5* 

Paint, i-inch, round 1 

Carbon 138^ 

1-inch 77 

f-inch 400 

J-inch 100 

i-inch 300^ 

i-inch 77 

1 i -inch 100' 

M-inch 10 

for stud insulation set 10* 

Contact 100' 

Bristle, round, 9-inch 13- 

Motor 125 

Bucket*?, galvanized iron 38^ 

Bughingj?: 

Rubber — 

i-inch 50 

j-inch 100- 

Brass 2 

Buttons: 

Single pull for thermoetab 2' 

Double pull for thermostab 4" 

Buzzers, stateroom 13^ 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIOKS. 1479 

Cabinet: Quantity. 

Glass door wood, 6 by 8 by 12 inches 

Tool, mahogany, 5 feet by 22 by 25 inches 

Mahogany, 6 drawers, 24 by 34 by 25 inches 

Oak, 3 drawers, 24 by 34 by 25 inches 

Galvanized iron, 2 dbora, 6 drawers, 24 by 55 by 72 inches 

Wood, 3 compirtments, 1 door, 20 by 32 by 72 inches 

Wood, 4 compartments, 3 doors, 30 by 5i by 7^ inches. . .- 

Mahogany — 

Brass front, 8 by 41 by 42 inches 

6 by 7 by 15J inches 

2 doore 9 by 24 by 30 inches 

for switchboard fire control, 5 by 15 by 27 inches 

Glass front with master clock, complete, 8 by 23 by 30 inches 

Galvanized iron, 1 door 16 by 20 by 53 inches 

Wood— 

6 compartments, 6 by 10 by 22 inches 

4 compartments, 6 by 1 1 by 22 inches 

10 compartments, 6 by 19 by 36 inches 

4 compartments, 8* by 9i by 22 inches 

4 compartments, 16 by 211 by 54 inches 

4 compartments, 26 inches by 6 by 6 feet 

4 compartments. 20 by 30 by'36 inches 13 

3shelves, 1 door, 20 by 20 by 24 inches 

4 shelves, 1 door, 25 by 38 by ^ irches 

1 drawer, 1 door, 12 by 24 by 36 inches 

Glass top, ? drawers, 6 by 8 by 10 inches 

Cable, lead cover feet . . 45 

Callaphone, brass (Cory type), 5 by 5 by 15 inches ^ 

Can: 

Brass — 

Benzine, 1 pint 1 

Oil 7 

00, 1-^allon 2^ 

Gasoline, 5-gallon S 

Waste, galvanized iron, 30-inch 1 

Caps: 

Switch, 1 Vinch, with 4-inch chain 11 

Braas, 1-inch 22 

Composition, binding posj 25 

B raas, 1 i-inch 20 

Fuse, porcelain ^ 480* 

Carbon, lamp: 

Iby 16mches 7 

f by 16 inches 4 

11 by 16 inches 16 

iby 16 inches 125 

I by 8 inches 150- 

Carboy: 

Distilled water 8 

Sulphuric acid , 4 

Ca^g: 

Galvanized iron, 6 by 8 by 17 inches 1 

Oak wood, 7 by 14 by 181 inches I 

Telephone receiver, 4 by 5 by 13 inches 1 

Cells, dry 28^ 

Chest: 

Oak wood — 

9 by 12 bv 15 inches 1 

11 by 15 by 26 inches I 

6 by 11 by 16i inches 1 

Galvanized iron — 

16 by 20 by 38 inches v ^ 

12i by 22i by 34 inches 3. 

Chisel: 

^old,5-iiich 2 

Flat, 7-inch 9' 



1480 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Cbisel — Continued . 

Calking— QBtDUti. 

6-inch 10 

■ 8-inch S 

Clam pa: 

Wire cnm position, i by 1 by 1 inch 6 

Iron, 5-inch 1 

Pipe, galvanized iroo, oasorted 5SS 

Galvanised iron- 
finch 50 

1-inch 345 

1-inch 1 

i-inch 100 

Galvanised iron— 

i-inch 250 

l(-inch 175 

1 }-inch 625 

li-inch 300 

1-inch 175 

Grip 1 

Checkfl, tool. hrsBB, 1-inch 110 

Cleaner, vacuum parts, l>earing eccentric, base, top aluminum 1 

Clips: 

C-oppei', i-inch 100 

rarlwn pounds.. 2 

Fuse 12 

Clock: 

Stop, Navy. 10-inch 1 

HP., 8-inch 29 

H. P., 10-inch 1 

Clororinate-caloK pounds., } 

Closet, wood, 2 by 24 bv 4 feet 1 

Coloring, lamp, aasortea, 6 bottles 6 

Compaee: 
Gyro- 
Master, complete 2 

Repeator, 51 by 12 inches 3 

Radio, comjilete 1 

Electric, 14 -inch .' 1 

Conduct, snap 1 

Conductor, 20-inch 3 

Circle, astemeter, brass, 20-inch 4 

Coil: 

Relay 10 

Repeater 12 

Spark, 2-inch 1 

Induction 9 

Shunt field 17 

Fickler radio 1 

Resistance — 

5 by 5 feet by 9 inchee 10 

5 by 11 by 15 inches 4 

5 by 7 inches 2 

Battery I 

Heating triangle, F. 18 30 

Choke, 5i by 11 inches 1 

Vibrator, miniature 27 

Collars: 

1 by li inches 4 

1 by i inch 15 

Iron, 21 -inch 2 

Contact; 

Make door 2 

Switch 18 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1481 

Contact^ — Continued. 

Switchboard — Quantity. 

Copper pounds. . 42 

Porcelain do 42 

Spring, porcelain 60 

Arcing set, 18 parte each ; 3 

Carbon, motor 1 

Repeater — 

Male, for clock 4 

Female, for clock 7 

Fuse 6 

Condenser: 
Electric — 

4i by 3i inches 30 

4 J by 3 } inches 3 

Galvanized iron, assorted 100 

Brass, 2 J by 4 by 7 inchee 1 

Composition, 7 by 7 by 7 inches 4 

Transmitting, 4 by 63 inches 8 

Tinfoil cover, transmitting 7 

Transmitting 1 ^ 6 

Iron — 

8 bv 6J inches 1 

2 bv 3 bv 4 inches 1 

li by 2 by 5 inches 6 

4i by 8J mches 1 

Cord: 

Extension and lamp, 7 inches 4 

Drop V feet.. 932 

Plug for heaters do 80 

Plug for telephone — 

10 feet each 24 

No. 349 feet. . 30 

No. 448 do. ... 148 

No. 521 do ... . 100 

No. 549 do 5 

No. 10 do 20 

White, telephone pounds. . 2 

Control, automatic, 12 by 17 by 30 inches 1 

Core, tranfilormer, 1 by 10 by 14 inches 8 

Controller, elevator, noor 1 

Converter, motor, 1,500 amperes 2 

Coupling: 

Ihy linch 13 

Brass, 1 inch 15 

Covers: 

Canvas — 

7 by 4 feet 2 

18 feet square 1 

3 by 3i feet 1 

4 by 4 feet 1 

Switch iron, 3 inches 19 

Switch N. P. 4-way 26 

Fuse composition — 

300 amperes '. 1 

200 amperes 1 

Box, mahogany, 15 by 24 inches 1 

Signal light 25 

Lamp, porcelain, 4 inches 48 

Porcelain, gUt, 3i by 6} inches 70 

Receiver telephone 22 

Connection box 1 by 6i by 6 inches 20 

Starting box, galvanized iron, 7 by 8 by 9 inches 1 

Percolator 1 

Cuppers: 

Radio composition, 3§ by 6 inches 5 

Primary radio, 3} by 4 inches -. 4 

177088— 20— PT 4 16 



1482 SHIPPINQ BOAKD OPERATIONS. 

Cut-out, porceUJn: Qnwuttr. 

20 amperes Ml 

60 ftrnperea 65 

Covers, automatic, complete 1 

Ciowfeet: 

a inch.... 31 

2i incheH.'. 5 

Connector, wire: 

No. 0000 200 

Deek: 

Wood, 5 by 19 by 24 inches 1 

Mahogany, 1 drawer, i by IS by 22 inchee 2 

Wee: 

Bran, 191 inches 6 

Telephone 120 

Dipper, metal 3 

Door, galvanized iron, switchboard, 19 by 68incfaw 10 

Dome, glaaa: 

Oval, 15 by 21 inches 5 

Round — 

lOi inches 17 

15 inches 15 

22 inches 1 

Beaded, Ifi inches 1 

Frosted, 14 inches 2 

Drawer: 

Oak, 41 by 22 by 23 inchee 1 

Haboguiy — 

8 by 91 by 20 inchee. . ; - 1 

8 by 27 by 28 inchee 1 

Drill: 

Electric, HK., 500 kilowatte 5 

Bit— 

A inch 1 

jinch 1 

I inch 2 

Aasorted 19 

Drum, galvanized iron, elevator (card floor type) 3 

End brush: 

Rear, galvanized iron J 

Forward, galvanized iron 1 

Extensions, portable. fe«t. . 385 

Face, push button: 

24 by 4 inches L 24 

21 by 61 inches 10 

2-hole— 

21 by 61 inchee 30 

2* by 7* inchee 45 

by 9 inches 30 

21 by 6 inches 30 



inch.. 



e, 8-inch 

us pounds. 



SHIPPING BOAKD OPERATIOKS. 1483 

Fixtures: Quantity. 

Lamp, brass, 3-way, 8 by 10 inches 5 

wau : 1 

Frame: 

Electric fan— 

12-inch 44 

8-inch 7 

18-inch 1 

Picture, oak, glass front, } by 36 by 30 inches 1 

Wood, glass front — 

8 by 13 inches 1 

7 by lOJ inches 1 

5 by 46 by 96 inches 1 

Nickel-plated switchboard — 

i by 2 by 60 inches 1 

2 by 45 inches by 6 feet 1 

2 by 54 inches by 6 feet 1 

2 by 57 inches by 6 feet 1 

} by 36 inches by 5 feet , 1 

Brass switchboard — 

} by 26 by 68 inches 2 

i by 40 by 68 inches 2 

J by 2 7 by 68 inches 1 

Fsuicets, brass, drain 4 

Fuse: 

Economy — 

5 amperes 4 

10 amperes 54 

20 amperes 4 

Oartddge, glass — 

3 amperes 190 

6 amp^eres 81 

Cartridge, i>orcelain — 

6 amperes 88 

2 amperes 160 

4 amperes 182 

10 amperes 489 

15 amperes 228 

20 amperes 739 

25 amperes 1,970 

35 amperes 463 

40 amperes 10 

► 60 amperes 348 

80 amperes 1 818 

100 amperes 990 

120 amperes 455 

160 amperes 682 

IfiO amperes 60 

50 amperes 760 

200 amperes 75 

250 amperes 10 

750 amperes 50 

190 amperes 12 

30 amperes 25 

Brass, 20 amperes 8 

Spare parts, 150 amp^eres 3 

Copper-lead connection 300 

Ribbon — 

5 amperes 153 

160 amperes 400 

200 amperes 4 

225 amperes 14 

250 amperes 27 

350 amperes 6 

360 amperes 6 

380 amperes I 

400 amperes I 



1484 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Fuae — rent id iied , 

Ribbon- Continued. QoiBtttj. 

800 amperes M 

600 amperes 1 

Base, porcelain — 

6 amperes 218 

10 amperes 196 

15 amperes 151 

16 amperes I 

Base— 

Porrelain— 

20 amperes , l,f51 

25 amperes 11 

30 amperes 51 

35 amperes M 

CO amperes 220 

100 amperes 51 

125 amperes 7 

1 10 amperes R 

150 amperes 1 

160 amperes i 

190 amperes 13 

230 amperes 1 

80 amperes 22 

Gap: 

Arch : 1 

Quench — 

' Telfurker type 25 Ifc 1 

II plate 21 inch diameter 1 

Gaskets: 

Rubber— 

2Hnch 4» 

2-inch 67 

3-inch W 

4-inch 190 

6-inch 300 

8-inch 100 

Compofli'ion - . 18 

Insulated, G-inch. B 

Wood. 3ibv5i inches 16 

Rubber, iV-'ich pounds.. i 

Porthole lining 2S • 

Manhole, 11 inches 50 

Monmetet (0. Withstein) 5 kg. capacity I 

Steam brass — 

14 inches 2 

IJ by 4 inches 4 

li by 2 inches 2 

Oil....... 3 

Oil, copper 2 

Telegraph, brass 4 

Steam (Schaffer & Buddenburgi, 5 pounds 7 

3 inches S 

14 inchea 1 

linch 6 

Bevel— 
G. 1,— 

15 tooth 1 

20 tooth 1 

30 tooth 1 

C. I.— 

16 tooth 2 

20tooth 2 

__ 30 tooth 2 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1485 

Generator: Quantity. 

For chaining telephone batteries 1 

D. C. radio IJ by IJ inches 1 

S. & S. type, 500 amperes .' 1 

D. (\ S. <fe S. 70 watts, 22 volts 1 

A. C. S. d S.— 

150 amperes 1 

1500 amperes 4 

22.7 amperes 1 

25 amperes 1 

25 amperes 2 

9.1 amperes 2 

Ozone, 19 by 23 inches 6 

For shaft 3 

Gear, worm, 1 by 3i inches 1 

Generator, for rudder angle indicator 1 

Glasses: 

liquid, wood casing, German radio ; 4 

Switchboard, 10 by 2J inches * 2 

Porthole, 12 inches 2 

Gong: 

Brass— 

8 inches 3 

6 inches 2 

Oval 4 

13 inches W. E. Co 1 

3 inches 1 

2 bells, 12 inches 1 

Port rev erse 12 



5 inches 7 

7 inches 1 

Cory tvpe, 6 inches 8 

Pear shape brass, 6 inches 5 

Oval, brass 6 inches 3 

Grease: 

Albany pounds. . 35 

Gun, brass — 

15-inch 2 

18-inch 1 

Guard: 
Lamp — 

Steam-tight — 

6 inches 312 

8 inches 148 

7 inches '. 31 

3J inches 319 

5J-inch 13 

11-inch 3 

5-inch 13 

4-inch 59 

14-inch 1 

Wire, 4-inch 18 

Bell wire, 10-inch 18 

Lamp plates — 

Brass, 4-inch 15 

Brass, 4^iiich 95 

Tin , 6-inch 500 

Fan, 12-inch 2 

Level 2 

Generator, Thacometer, 3J-inch ;. 1 

Hammer: ' 

l-pound 1 

Balpean — 

J-pound 2 

1-pound 2 

Hammock, Navy canvas, 20-foot 2 



1486 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Head-set, radio: QomnUiy. 

W. E. type, 2,200 ohnifl I 

Baldwin type, 1,000 ohmB 1 

- W. E., 2,000 ohms 4 

Heaters: 

Water, N . P. , 6 by 18 inches 2 

Electric — 

2 by 7 inches 4 

7 bv 20 inches -. 3 

12 ty 12 inches 6 

10 by 25 inches 1 

151 by 23§ inches 4 

3 by 5 by 11 inches 25 

3 by 11 bvlU inches 1 

4 by lOi 6y 23 inches 3 

4 by 8 by 17 inches 17 

6 by 8 by 16 inches 2 

5 by 7 by 17 inches...-. 1 

5 by 14 by 14 inches 2 

6 by 4 by 18 inches 1 

3 by 6 by 18 inches 1 

4 by 8 by 12 inches 7 

1,200 W 2 

15 amperes ' 1 

Helmet, head-gear five complete 1 

Helizs, 18 turns, j-inch brass ribbon 1 

Hoist, elevator complete (Carl Faber type) 4 

Holders: 

Brush carbon — ^ 

Brass 3 

Steel 253 

G. I. for carbon, 7 by 17 inches 13 

Button, backplate 24 

Lampshade, brass 1 

Hooks: 

Brass, single 9 

N. P.— 

Single 5 

Triple 3 

Indicators: 

G. I. push button 1 

Troops, base with glass 5 by 16 by 17 inches 1 

Direction, Eng. casing — 

9-inch 8 

17-inch 4 

Rudder angle brass 3 

Floor 1 

Shaft , 1 

Induction: 
Ariel — 

13 turns, J-foot ribbon 2 

11 turns, |-foot ribbon 6 

Insulator: 

Glass, 6-inch 1 

Porcelain — 

2 by 8 inches 6 

2 by 5i inches 8 

Composition, 3 by 6 inches 6 

Corrugated 3 

Iron, soldering, electric 4 

Jacket, life 1 

Jars, condenser, 4J by 13J inches 3 

Joint: 

Brass — 

2iby linch 8 

J by li inches 10 

Joint, brass pounds.. 156 

Copper do 12 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1487 

Joint, brads— Continued. Quantity. 

Lead pounds.. 191 

I ron do 200 

Steel do.... 100 

Key: 

Telesjiaph 1 

Clock 12 

And chain, brass 7 

Composition, radio 1 

Door, steel 27 

Relay for transmitter 2 

Knife, trimming 1 

Knob: 

Door, brass 2 

Composition 40 

Split, porcelain 500 

Lamp: 

Electric (Robertson) — 

5-watt clear screw 840 

10-watt clear screw ^ 100 

15-watt clear screw 460 

5-watt red screw '. .' 115 

2i-candlepower clear screw 250 

6-candlepower clear screw 40 

60-watt clear screw 138 

100-watt clear screw , 13 

Franklin type — 

25-watt, full front 10 

Osram — 

10-watt bayonet 902 

20- watt bayonet 100 

20-watt blue bayonet 130 

25-watt clear bayonet 90 

25-watt blue bayonet 2 

30-watt clear bayonet 55 

30-watt } frost bayonet 833 

60-watt clear bayonet 100 

30-watt frost bayonet 1, 436 

50-watt i frost bayonet : 575 

Edison — 

10-wattclear bavonet 101 

10-watt, red , bayonet 35 

16-candlepower, blue, screw 1 

20-watt, clear, screw 2, 451 

20-watt, red 5 

20-watt, blue, bayonet 395 

25-watt, clear, bayonet 9, 479 

25-candlepower, carbon, screw 30 

40-watt, clear 1, 559 

40-watt, blue 40 

60-watt, clear, screw 4, 600 

100-watt, blue, screw 100 

40-watt, clear, screw 77 

50-watt, frost 255 

200- watt, frost, screw 12 

250-watt, clear, screw 438 

200- watt, clear, screw 4 

200-watt, frost, screw 19 

300- watt, clear, screw 97 

300-watt, clear, screw 2 

500-watt, frost, screw 12 

Electric- 
Edison— 

500-watt, frost, screw 53 

1,000-watt, clear, screw 10 

Tubular, 4 amperes 116 



1488 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Lamp — Continued . 
Electric — 

Westinghoufle— Quantity. 

8-candlepower, clear, screw 416 

15-candlepower, clear, screw 20 

15- watt, clear, screw 65 

20- watt, clear, screw 436 

25-watt, clear, screw 340 

40-watt, clear, screw 347 

100- watt, clear, screw 72 

200-watt, clear, screw «, 31 

500- watt, clear, screw 65 

1 , 000- watt , frosted 12 

60-watt, clear, screw 13 

5-watt, clear, screw 231 

15-watt, clear, candle 15 

8-candlepower, screw 145 

25-candlepower, clear, screw 30 

4-candlepower, clear, screw 16 

25-watt, carbon, clear 200 

125-watt, carbon, clear 40 

Miniature — 

Westinghouse — 

8- watt, clear, screw 30 

16-candlepower, clear, screw .\ 726 

16-candlepower, clear, bayonet 10 

2- watt, clear, screw 30 

T-8, red, screw 90 

Brittania — 

20-watt, clear, bayonet 35 

20-watt, frosted, bayonet 115 

40-watt, frosted, bayonet 100 

Hartford — 

2- watt, clear, screw 238 

25-watt, frost, screw 70 

Extension 53 

Sunbeam, 25-watt, clear 4 

Telephone 12 

Signal 6 

Portable, brass 12 

Signal — 

W. E. Co. No. 2 100 

National No. 2 340 

Thermostat, 30 watt, bayonet ^ 4 

Dever water-tight, brass, 6-foot lead pipe, 7 feet by 9 inches 2 

Oil, copper 2 

Table, brass — 

8 by 24 inches 1 

6 by 30 inches 1 

Desk, 24-inch, 3 bulb s 1 

Table, 24-inch, single 3 

Protector, water-tight 9 

Cargo and guard, 19 inches 11 

Cargo (cluster) portable 4 

Cargo and guard 15 inches 1 

Arc, 18 incnes 1 

500-watt, clear, screw 11 

Brass, portable 4 

Shields cargo, galvanized iron 5 

Testing 2 

Locker: 
Wood— 

48 by 48 by 96 inches 2 

24 by 24 inches by 6 feet 1 

Bench attached, 2 drawers, 16 by 38 inches 2 

Wood, 3 shelves, 21 by 28 by 38 inches 1 



2 



2 
7 
5 

1 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1489 

Locker— Continued. Quantity . 

Galvanized iron, 2 doors, 3 shelves, 12 by 18 inches by 6 feet 

Galvanized iron, 1 door, 2 shelves, 17 by 20 by 36 inches 

Wood, 2 doors, 7 by 4 by 2 feet 

Steel, 2 doors, 2 shelves, 16 by 16 by 24 inches 

Steel, 1 by 2i by 5 feet 

Galvanized iron — 

2 doors, 6 drawers, 2 by 4 by 6 feet 

1 door, 13 by 18 by 35 inches 

1 door, 20 by 28 inches by 6 feet 

Ladder, step: 

5-foot 

3-foot 

3i-f oot 

Lamp: 

Fire control, Herman type , 52 

Bunk, no glass, 9 inches '. 17 

Cabinet, Herman type 52 

Indicator, fire control 83 

Lantern: 

Top braas 

Turbine, 9 by 12 inches 7 

Latch, door, brass 

Lead: 

Double, 3 foot 

Sheet, 7 feet by 8J inches 3 

Length fuse 1, 100 

Li^t: 

Running 1 

Gooseneck 1 

Pilot, nickel-plate casing — 

green 4 

red 6 

Search — 

14-inch diameter 1 

12-inch diameter 1 

Ligjiter, dgar (Midland) 7 

Liners , P . B . lamp socket 264 

Lock: 

Pad. braas 19 

Interlocking, brass 1 

Magnet: 

Holtzer cabot, 80 volts 1 

Field— 

5 by 7 by 11 inches 24 

3 by 11 by 13 inches 3 

Winding for loud speaker 6 

Mallet, wood, i pound 2 

Meter: 

Freguenze, 575 oscillations 1 

MilUe for fire control 53 

Volt— 

Nickel-plate casing, S. & S. — 

140voltfl 9 

350 volts 1 

220 volts 2 

130 volts 8 

110 volts 6 

50 volts 1 

30 volts 1 

Nickel plate, Westinghouse Electric type, S. S., 110 volts 1 

Ampere, nickel-plate casing — 

400 ampares 1 

50 amperes 1 

3,000 amperes v 5 

6.5 ampires 12 



1490 SHIPPINQ BOABD OFBBATIOKS. 

Ueter: 

Ampere — 

Nickel-plate cuing — Qtuoiiiy. 

200MnperM 3 

lOONnperea 2 

35ainpare« 3 

10 amperes 1 

1 unp«re 2 

BruBcaamg — 

30 amperea :...■. 1 

Samperea 1 

250 amperes 1 

80 amperes 1 

1,000 ampere* 7 

120 tunpsres 1 

Galvani7^-iroD casing — 

SOOamperee 1 

350 amperes 1 

310 amperes '. 1 

Volt— 

Cent.. 110 volw, 64 amperee 2 

S. & 8., 110 volts, 25 amperes 1 

S. 4 S.p 50 volts, 5 amperes 1 

Tachometer, 5,500 revolutions. B. R. casing 1 

Mino, vacuum, 5,500 revolutions 1 

18 bv 24 inches 1 

Oval, wood frame, 18 by 7 inches 1 

Electric, 8. & 8. — 

14.7 horeepower. 2 

124 horsepower 2 

20 horsepower 7 

50 horsepower Z 

10 horsepower 20 

9.5 horsepower 1 

7,5 horsepower 1 

7 horsepower 5 

9 horsepower G 

6.5 horsepower 7 

7.7 horsepower 21 

1 7 horaepower 2 

5.5 horsepower - I 

5 horsepower 15 

4.8 horsepower .■ 1 

4.75 horsepower 1 

4.3 horsepower 3 

4.7 horsepower 22 

3 horsepower 5 

4 horsepower r. 

3.5 horsepower I 

2.3 horsepower t 

2 horsepower I 

1 horsepower 37 

1.2 horsepower 5 

Electric, A. E, G,— 

5 horsepower 1 

3 horsepower 1 

1 horsepower I 

31 horsepower f . . 3 

.9 horsepower 3 

1^ horsepower 2 

Charging storage batteries, 27.5 horsepower 2 

Fan 4 

Gas, Gardner type, 200 horsepower I 

Gae, Gardaer type, 4 horsepower I 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1491 

Motor — Con tin Ued . 

Electric, S. & S.~ Quantity. 

31 horsepower 2 

13.9 horsepower 7 

13 horsepower 4 

13.7 horsepower I 

5.7 horsepower 2 

3.9 horsepower 1 

10.2 horsepower 6 

9.2 horsepower *. . . : ] 

9} horsepower 1 

12.2 horsepower 2 

4.2 horsepower 2 

29.5 horsepower 4 

.5 horsepower 4 

16.3 horsepower 2 

} horsepower J 

6 horsepower : 1 

J horsepower 2 

^V horsepower 1 

Nails: 

Wire, flat, IJ inches pounds . . 15 

Copper : do 2i 

Nipples, assorted 36 

Nozzle, hnea hose 1 

Nuts: 

Brass, No. 32 144 

iV-inch : 60 

iV-uich 12 

•^r-inch 36 

'assorted pounds.. 2 

Steel, i-inch 15 

Oil: 

Cylinder gallons. . 5 

Linseed , do 10} 

Outlet: 

Porcelain 10 

Benjamin, 6-wav brass 1 

Hug: 

Fuse, Pyre t5rpe, }-inch. . . , 23 

Fuse, porcelain, 20-ainpere, Edison type 34 

Fuse, porcelain, 10-ampere, Edison type 75 

Fuse, porcelain, 25-volt8 (German) 54 

Switch, porcelain, lO-amperes 16 

Switch, composition, lO-amperes 16 

Switch, male end, lO-amperes 1 

Cover, extension 2 

Watertight : 2 

Telephone, box navy 10 

Protection: 
LamjH- 

3-inch, blue 58 

5-inch, blue 19 

9-inch, clear 24 

5-inch, frosted 99 

4J-inch, clear 4 

5-inch, clear : 10 

6-inch, clear 41 

5i-inch^ clear 26 

7-inch, clear 13 

8-inch, clear 3 

10-inch, clear 10 

Pinion: 

Rawhide H. S., for paring machine 2 

Rawhide H. P. for jMuing machine 1 

Packing: 

Rubber sheets iV-uich ' pounds. . 50 

PiBtonrod: 15 



i 



1492 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Plug, braas: QnantRy, 

i-inch \b 

}-inch 

Pads: 

Stamping, 3 by 7 inches, red S 

Cloth receiver'hardpiece I 

Plug, extension, brass ft2 

Pan, dust, galvanized iron 5 

Paint, black gallons. . 2 

Paper, sand sheets 1^ 466 

Plaster paris pounds. . 2(^ 

Paper, emery, quires 5 

Petrolatum, can pounds. . 3 

Pump, centrifugal 2 

Pump, vacuum 1 

Panel, marble: 

2 by 3 by 1 inch 1 

2 by 4 by 1 inch 1 

3 by 4 by 1 inch 3^ 

4 by 54 by 1 inch S 

8 by 15J by 1 inch 1 

8 by 15 by 1 inch 1 

9 by 16 by 1 inch 1 

9 by 19 by 1 inch 4 

9i by 37 by 1 inch 1 

10 by 12 by 2 inches 2 

11 by 21 by 1 inch 5 

11 by 22 by 1 inch '. 2 

11 by 24 by 1 inch 4 

11 by 35 by 1 inch 1 

llj by 15J by 1 inch 1 

12 by 12 by 1 inch 6 

12 by 35 by 1 inch 1 

13 by 15} by 1 inch S 

13 by 36 by 1 inch 2 

13i by 35 by 1 inch ; 1 

14 by 36 by 1 inch 1 

14iby 15i by 1 inch 5 

15 by 22 by 1 inch 3 

15 by 24 by 1 inch 2 

15i by 16 by 1 inch : 3 

15i by 19i by 1 inch 2 

16 by 8 by 1 inch 1 

16 by 19 by 1 inch 3 

16 by 24 by 1 inch 1 

16} by 36 by 1 inch 2 

17 by 24 by 1 inch 6 

17 by 31 by 1 inch 3 

18 by 48 by 1 inch 1 

19 by 21 by 1 inch 3 

19 by 24 byl inch 5 

19 by 36 by 1 inch 1 

19} by 35 by 1 inch 1 

20 by 20 by 1 inch 2 

21 by 22 by 1 inch 1 

22 by 29 by 1 inch S 

23 by 48 by 1 inch S 

24 by 35 by 1 inch ,. 1 

25 by 28 by 1 inch 1 

25 by 30 by 1 imh : 1 

26 by 31 by 1 inch 2 

26 by 36 by 1 inch 2 

26 by 68 by 1 inch 2 

27 by 36 by 1 inch 1 

27 by 68 by 1 inch 1 

28 by 29 by 1 inch 2 

28 by 38 bv 1 inch 2 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1493 

Panel, marble — Continued. Quantity. 

29 by 44 by 1 inch 1 

30 by 40 by 1 inch 1 

32 by 40 by 1 inch 1 

32 by 42 by 1 inch 2 

33 by 35 by 1 inch 1 

35 by 36 by 1 inch 5 

36 by 52 by 12 inches 1 

36 by 53 by 1 inch 2 

39 by 39 by 1 inch 2 

40 by 40 by 1 inch 1 

40 by 68 by 1 inch 2 

Pump: 

Air (Gardner type), 24 inches 1 

Motor, 0.9 horsepower 1 

Points, silver, relay 50 

Plug connection, male 10 

Poles, center, brass for switchboard 1 

Plui5, wood shunt, 5 inches 31 

Poliidi metal, can, 15 pints 

Plier, 8 inches 1 

Pulley, steel: 

4i by 9 inches 1 

3 inches 1 

Punch: 
Steel— 

} by 5 inches 6 

Nail— 

5 inches 1 

6 inches 1 

7 inches 3 

8 inches 4 

10 inches 1 

Gasket — 

3 inches 1 

6 inches 2 

Brass, 6 inches 1 

Piping, copper: 

4-mch foot- . 50 

1-inch do 75 

Platform, wood, 44 by 60 inches 1 

Percolator, nickel-plated, 8 by 16 inches 3 

Panel: 

Marble— 

Nickel-plated frame — 

57 inches by 6 feet by 1 J inches 3 

54 inches by 6 feet by IJ inches 1 

45 inches by 6 feet by \\ inches 1 

36 by 60 by 1 inch : 1 

4 by 31i by 44 inches 1 

Brass frame, 31 by 43 by 1 inch 1 

Mahogany frame — 

18 by 20 by 1 inch 1 

12 by 20 by 1 inch 1 

30 by 31 by 1 inch 1 

31 by 36 by 1 inch 1 

Resistance 10 outlet 1 

Battery charging 2 

Composition — 

22i by 46 by 1 inch 1 

20 by 36 by linch 3 

16 by 30 by 1 inch 4 

11 by 35 by 1 inch 5 

13 by 37 by 1 inch 1 

4 by 7 by 1 inch 4 

Nickel-plated casing, 12 by 33 by 36 inches 1 

Oven, 110 volts D. C 1 



1494 SHIPPING BOARD OPBRATIOKS. 

Panel— Continued . QoMitliy. 

Slate, 22 by 43 by 1 J inches I 

Galvanized iron } by 32 by 39 inches 2 

Audion, Navy type 2 

Control, galvanized iron, 16 by 24 by 30 inches 1 

Post bindini;: 

Compantion, H. T 26S . 

Composition, H. T 1, 667 

Brafls, H. T -. 28 

Brafls, H. T 194 

Plates: 

Carbon — 

i by 6 by 12 inches 9 

1 by 6 by 12 inches 12 

4 by 4 by 5 inches 7 

f by 6J by 12 inches 2» 

Contact brass — 

i by 4i inches 6 

2 by 2i inches 2 

Brass, 6 pounds 

(V)pper, round, J by 6 inches 1 

Galvanized-iron, -^ by 6J by 13 inches 1 

Composition, 1 by 7 by 17 inches 1 

Steel, center switch 1 

Brass knob, 2i inches 1 

Galvanized-iron back, 3 inches 1 

Angle, lamp, plain brass — 

finch 36 

li inches 6 

Spark, radio, 3-inch 12 

Steel repeater, 1 J by 1 inch 12 

Brass lamp oval — 

4 by 7 J inches 2 

4 inches 1 

Condenser radio, 6 by 12 inches 35 

Plug telegraph bars, 4 plugs, 7 inches 1 

Glass, f by 4 by 4 inches 4 

Name, 1 by 3 inches 24 

Brass — 

5J by 8J inches 11 

7 by 13 inches 1 

2 by 44 inches 4 

f by 1^ inches AO 

1 by 2i inches M 1,591 

i by 3i inches 12 

2 b^^ 4* inches 74 

Galvanized-iron for bottom of switchboard — 

15 by 19 inches 1 

16 by 22 inches 1 

16 by 53 inches 1 

Rack: 

Galvanized-iron — 

2 doors, 6 drawers, 24 by 55 by 78 inches 1 

50 compartment^, 30 by 6} by 12 inches 1 

25 compartments, 6 J by 1 1 i inches 1 

9 compartments, 55 by 55 inches 1 

6 compartments, 55 by 55 inches 1 

5 compartments, 55 by 75 inches 1 

7 compartments, 36 by 78 inches 1 

For carbonic tanks, 9 inches round 3 

Wood— 

48 compartments, 8 inches by 2 by 3 feet 1 

For turoine blades, 3 inches by fi^feet 1 

60 compartments, 8 feet by 34 by 68 inches 1 

5 compartments, 3 shelves, 12 by 24 by 34 inches 1 

23 compartments, 24 by 30 inches 1 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1495 

Back — Ccoitiiiued. 

Motor with iron braces — Quantity. 

•2 by 12 by 15 iBchee 1 

11} by 15i by 17 inches 1 

Receiver: 

Radio 1 

Telephon?, W. E 19 

Shuenten, type lA 2 

Transmitter, W. E. Co., No. 929 

Wireless, 10 feet of cord 2 

Receptacle: 

tirass, 4-way 37 

Porcelain 20 

Caigo, weatherproof 1 

Roesette, ceiling brass, 6-way 155 

Red: 

Carbon, 1 by 15 inches 1 

Brass, 10-inch 200 

Insulator, 18-inch 22 

Rope: 

J-inch feet.. 151 

J-inch do 420 

J-inch do 225 

Rasp, 15-inch 1 

Reclucer: 

Coupling brass, } by 1 J by 3J inches 135 

Coupling iron, } by J by 2 inches 60 

Relays, 2 coils for elevator system 17 

R^:ulators, S. & S.: 

4 by 14 by 16 inches 9 

8 by 14 by 14 inches 3 

6 by 7 by 9 inches 8 

7 by 7 by 9 inches 4 

6i by 7 by 12 inches 18 

100 ohms 1 

98 ohms 5 

90 ohms 6 

88 ohms 1 

80 ohms 16 

60 ohms • 10 

2.3 ohms 14 

7.5 horsepower 21 

37 horsepower 1 

29 horsepower « 9 

Reeulators, shunt type, 80 amperes 2 

Reflector: 

Porcelain — 

18-inch A 1 

5-inch t 12 

Glass— 

15-inch 1 

18-inch 1 

Galvanized -iron, 18-inch 1 

Glass, 8-inch 90 

Galvanized -iron, 17-inch ' 1 

Nickel -plated, 12-inch 2 

Cai^go— 

22-inch 2 

17-inch 3 

Rheostat: 
S. & S.— 

2 feet by 3} by 1 inch 2 

75 amperes 17 

26 volts 5 

80 amperes, 110 volts • 2 

For voltmeter 9 

For amperes 9 



1496 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

# 

Bheoetat — Continued. Quanttty. 

Conz, 110 volts, 2 amperes 2 

Cutler & Hammer .' 1 

Ring: 

BrasB— 

i-inch 150 

Oil 8 

For sailing dome — • 

16-inch 1 

22-inch 1 

13-inch 15 

For lamp ^ard, 4J inches 3 

Guard composition, 1^ amperes 25 

Assorted composition 4, 500 

100 amperes 1, 065 

80 amperes 274 

Porcelain — 

136 amperes 25 

125 amperes 120 

100 amperes 262 

80 amperes 40 

60 amperes 2, 600 

50 amperes 510 

35 amperes 1, 120 

25 amperes 1, 535 

20 amperes 2, 320 

15 amperes 750 

10 amperes 600 

4 amperes 1, 540 

Regulator, S. <fc S.: 

10 horsepower 2 

30 horsepower 2 

Rings, brass, 3i by i inch 36 

Scraper: 

Bilge, 9-inch 1 

Wire 1 

Screws: 

Assorted, brass 120 

Assorted, brass .^.pounds. . 60^ 

Assorted, brass, 1 by 16 inches *. 125 

Brass — 

1 by I inch 125 

No. 14 535 

A-inch round head ' 225 

Iron, No. 10 244 

Assorted pounds. . 22 

Starter, resistance 2 J amperes 2 

Sheets, mica .^ '. pounds. . 4 

Shade lamp: 
Cloth— 

4 by 5 inches 51 

4 by 4 inches 9 

18 by 18 inches 2 

Tin, 8 inches 30 

Glass, 4J by 6 inches 3 

Sheeting: 

Fiber, J by 24 by 30 inches 1 

Ribbon, iVinch pounds. . 5i 

Shelf: 

Wood— 

3 drawers, 12 by 36 inches 1 

Book, 20 by 24 inches . 3 

Woodwork — 

li by 23 by 71 inches 4 

3 by 10 by 10 inches 1 

10 feet by 6i by 1 inch 2 

3 by 2 feet by 1 inch ^ 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1497 

Shelf — Continued. 

Woodwork— Continued. Quanlty. 

26 by 60 by 1 inch 1 

12 by 18 by 1 inch 2 

21 by 24 by 1 inch 1 

Fans 15 

GftlTanized iron — 

2 brackets, 10 by 18 inches 1 

3 by 1 by 6 feet 1 

Sleeve: 

Nickel-plated, 1 by 1^ inches 24 

Lamp, brass, 1} by 2 inches 35 

Shackle, iron, 1) inches 3 

Stripe: 

Mica, li by 24 inches 100 

Copper, i by 1 by 12 inches 15 

Stand : 

Telephone, rubber 1 

Lamp, brass 5 

Siren, electric, 13 inches 1 

Stove, electric: 

2i bv 9i by 20 inches 1 

4 by 17i by 234 inches 1 

Stool, cam]) 8 

Strapping, iron: 

} by 5 inches 6 

I J)y 3 inches 3 

Stopper, brass, 1 J inches, with chain 2 

Solder pounds. . 13 

Spring: 

Brass, 1 J by 8 inches 16 

Steel— 

1 by 4 inches 12 

1| by 5} inches 8 

1 by 6 inches .' 2 

li by 5i inches 1 

J bv 15 inches feet. . 15 

Iron, 2 by 2J inches 5 

Generator 52 

Spanner, hose 1 

Soda, caustic pint. . J 

Sounder, brass, 7 inches 2 

Spool: 

Release No. 5 3 

Detector, primary 6 

Detector, secondary ^ 1 

Slate, battery chaining, 22i by 26 by 1 inch 1 

Socket: 

Weatherproof 4 

Keyless 38 

Molding 10 

Norbit, porcelain 60 

Wall key 11 

Fiber 20 

Extension, 3 inches 7 

Parts pounds. . 6 

Lamp — 

Large ^ 1 

Bayonet, j inch, plain brass 396 

Screw — 

Composition 54 

Brass 3 

Globe, steel 22 

Switch — 

Porcelain, gilded, 6 inches, round 250 

Porcelain Mse, female 20 

Wood, male 16 

177068— 20— PT 4 ^17 



1498 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Lamp— QnMliy- 

PorcelaiB 26S 

Base with key 28 

Base with key, 3 inches ; 1 

Motor, iron, with brass thread, 6 inches S 

Switch: 

Snap, porcelain — 

1 am peres 1 , 248 

5 amperes ^ 

15 amperes 22L 

6 amperes 101 

20 amperes 286 

30 amperes 57 

4-way 20 

Rosette for radio 1 

Complete 20 amperes 1 

(/hacq^ over 3 amperes 1 

Contact, composition 10 

Watertight, brass, 20 amperes 39 

Portable 10 

Ampineter 16 

Automatic — 

S. & S. 10 amperes 11 

Elevator 6.5 horsepower 2 

Tunilber or toggle 80 

Automatic 7 

Automatic block 2 

Jaw, 400 amperes 6 

l^imp 15 

Teleplione, German type 1 

Trip])le. push button, nickel-plated . 9 by 2} by 1 J inches 725 

Diamond H. — 

20 amperes ^ 

10 amperes 51 

30 amj)erefl \ 33 

100 ami)erc« 2 

Lighting. Navy type 1 

Limit, 6 contacts I 

Selector- - 

Navy type — 

i)-way 1 

2-way 1 

4-way - 11 

750 Bjnpcrim 42 

D. P. n. T. 

100 MU]>ttrt*H . , 3 

(K) arnp«'i<irt \ 5 

5/iO ttinjM'itw 1 

30 ttitijx'n'H 33 

20 ttiuj»**n*n 1 

D. P. S. T — 

250 amperes , I 

200 amperes 14 

100 amperes 8 

00 amperes 14 

30 amperes 20 

25 amperes 47 

20 amperes 3 

10 amperes 4 

15 amperes 5 

D. P. S. P.— 

600 amperes 2 

130 amperes 2 

6 amperes 2 

S. P. S. T.— 

500 amperes 11 

350 amperes 26 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1499 

Switch — Continued. 

S. P. S. T.— Continued. Quintiiy. 

250 amperes 34 

200 amperes 2 

150 amperes >• - ^^ 

130 amperes 57 

100 amperes 5 

80 amperes 31 

60 amperes 65 

50 amperes 1 

40 amperes 26 

35 amperes 16 

25 amperes '. 13 

10 amperes 18 

Switchboard, telephone: 

100 lights, oak. 20 by 60 inches, German type 1 

200 lights, oak, W. E 1 

Shaft, steel, 3 by 40 inches 1 

Table: 

Folding 1 

Oak, 30 by 36 inches 1: 

Mah(^:any — 

24 inches long 1 

12 by 38 by 30 inches 1 

2 drawers, 36 by 36 by 96 inch 1 

Galvanized iron, with wood base, 3 by 3 by 3 feet 1 

Tack: 

Wire, composition head lOO 

Copper pounds. . 15 

Tank: 

Steel- 
Air, 16 by 20 by 33 inches 1 

For gyrocompass 1 

For cylinder oil, empty, 30-gallon , 1 gauge, 5 faucets 1 

Carbonic liquid, empty ., 5 

Air, compressed, 250 pounds. .* I 

Gasoline, empty, 5 gallons 1 

Hydro gas, empty 2 

Oxygen, for fire helmet 1 

Water-cooler, 36 inches by 5 feet by 6 inches 1 

Tape: 

Manson, f-inch pound . . j 

Cotton, l-inch rolls. . 29 

Friction, l^-inches 1 

Top, glass, table: 

} by 1 8 b V 24 in ch es 1 

4by 17 bv 20 inches 1 

Tip, fuse 100 

Torch, brass, ^ 4 

Tape, steel, pipe, H"ch 1 

Towel, face 2 

Ticker, detector 1 

Tin, G. L., 11 by 11 inches 2 

Twine, cotton, white balls . . 2 

Thermometer: 
Navy type— 

40 degrees I 

230 degrees 1 

Glass, 54 inches I 

Telertione: 

W. E. type— 

533-A 9 

329-W 34 

Upright 2 

Utah, Navy type \ 4 

W. E., steam." 1 

S. A S., loud speaker 25 



1500 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Trimming, bras^, ^ by I inch, 52 feet 

Tin foil pound . . i 

Thermostat: 

For water 8\'8tem 15 

5 by 7 bv 13 inches 1 

40 to 90 l^'ahrenheit, N. P 117 

Turbine, steam (Brown Boveri Co., 445 horsepower) 5 

Transformer, oscillation, 13 inches 1 

TraBsfonner: 

10-kilowatt 1 

F. W.— 

3 bv 3 by 10 inches..^ 5 

3} by 5i by 9 inches 3 

7i by 10 by 15 inches 5 

4 by 7i by 11 inches 2 

6i by 9 b V Ui inches 4 

2i by 5i by 5 inches 5 

8i by 8i inches 11 

S. & H. , 6 by 6i by 13 inches 9 

Ahurm system, 6 by 8 by 12 inches 5 

Transmitter, W. &S 69 

Tubes: 

Terminal — 
Brass — 

iinch 250 

1 inch 15 

Mica. 8 inches 70 

Speaking — 

Condenser 1 6 

Brass, 2 by 8 inches 1 

Receiving, vacuum 10 

Testing, glass, 2-way, i by 8 inches 40 

And rack condenser 8 

Telegraph: 

Brass, 11 indct 7 

Dock and anchor, brass, 18 pts 7 

Unions, iron : 

i by 3 inches 2 

1 J by 2i inches 1 

Units: 

Heating 4 

Resistance set, 5 coil to set *. 3 

Vaseline pounds. . 2 

Valve: 

Brass, J inch 1 

Iron, 3 inches 1 

Wire: 

Insulated, H. T.— 

Lead feet. . 630 

Rubber do 140 

Copper — 

7-strand do 250 

10 inches do 120 

J-inch : do.... 200 

J-inch do 37 

|-inch do 30 

Flat pounds. . 5 

f-iiich feet. . 75 

Steel covered .pounds. . 5 

No. 16 do i 

No. 28 feet.. 1,000 

32, silk covered do 1, 368 

34,006 r do.... 1 

Covered do 25 

On spool do 3 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS, 1501 



Wire — Continued . 

BraaB— Qaantity. 

No. 14 feet.. 30 

125 
1 



2 

95 

30 

75 

550 

1,000 

100 

412 

105 

304 



l}-inch. 
1-inch. . 
1 J -inch. 
2-inch . . 
9-inch.. 
Monkey — 
15-inch. 
6-inch.. 
10-inch. 



5 
2 

i 



^inch do . . - 

Sleeh, 18 by 18 inches .* 

Steel- 
No. 332 pounds. 

No. 6 feet. 

i-inch do . . . 

7 strand fine do . . . 

10 strand fine do . . . 

Iron, No. 28 do. . . 

Fixture rubber covered do. . . 

Do do... 

Telephone do. . . 

ExtenFion cable do. . . 

Fuse — 

100 amperes jwundB. 

60 amperes do. . . 

40 amperes do . . . 

10 am]iereei do. . . 

Ma^f t. No. 32, silk covered do... 

Solder do. . . 

Wrench: 
Socket— 

|-inch 

|-inch 

i-inch 

I). E.— 

1 by 3 J inches I 

11 by If inches I 

1-inch 2 

2-inch :... 1 

2 by IJ inches 1 

H by 1 J inches 1 

l| by It'^ inches 1 

H by 1t^ inches I 

i by' 1 A inches 1 

i-inch S^ 

1-inch 1 

IJ-inch 1 

Ij-inch 1 

1 1 by IJ inches 2 

I by 1t>j inches 1 

lA-inch 2 

S, E.— 



16 



2 
I 
1 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 



Stilson, 7-inch 1 

Spanner 

Box, 1-inch 

Stuffing-box 



1 
1 
1 



SUPPLEMENTARY. 

Closet, wood. 2 by 7 by 12 feet 1 

Compartment, wood, 8 bv 4 by 41 feet 1 

Mouthpiece, -p<^akinir-tube. /. 15 



j 



1502 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

ENGINE DEPARTMENT. 

Qwittitf. 

Ammonia (Pareoiw) botUes. . • 

AsbestOB, 100-pound bags 8 

Anvil , pounds . . lOB 

Anvil, 4i by 10 by 24 inches I 

Bolts: 

1 by 1^ inches pounda . . 35 

Check, brass, i inch do. ... 15 

Follower 1 by If inches do 12 

4 by 1 indi 1 

D. E. brass, 20i by If inches 1 

Brass — 

by 3i inches pounds - . 40 

by 4i inches do 40 

Iron, i oy 3 inches do S 

Stove, steel — 

i by 2i inches do. ... 4 

I by 1 inch do 4 

J: by li inches do. ... 4 

by 2 inches do 2 

pin (Ash Houst) .* 2 

High-pressure, for nozzles ( Varhol-S-Ankerspill) 80 

Threaded, 8 by 2i inches 10 

Coupling — 

6 by 1 J inches 3 

II by 16 inches 2 

Dummy piston — 

5i by If inches 3 

7f by 2 inches 1 

Oasinff, with nuts and bushings * 3 

Olana cover, 2 by 4 inches 6 

Giand, 4J by If inches (new) 2 

Crosshead, If by 11 inches 8 

Squarehead, 21 by J inches 6 

Coupling — 

3i by 15 inches 6 

For lifting gear, IJ by 7 inches 7 

Special 4 

4f by If inches (new) 7 

4f by If inches (old) 2 

4i by 1 inch, iron 14 

li hy f inch, brass 8 

4 by f inch, steel • 10 

8 by I inch, iron 185 

2{ by } inch, brass •. 2 

f by 7 inches, iron 2 

16i by 11 inches, iron 1 

Eye — 

1-inch 23 

If-inches 7 

i-inch 30 

f -inch 2 

f-inch 15 

If-inches 2 

-inch 8 

-inch 2 

-inch 62 

H-inch 13 

H-inch 8 

Assorted 58 

Double threaded split — 

If inches 5 

li inches 5 

31 inches 1 

Iron, 51 inches 4 

Galvanized iron, for main throttle 2 



SHIPPIKO BOABD OPERATIONS. 1508 

Bolts — Continued . 

Stove — Quantity. 

2i by A inch 5 

4 bv A inch 5 

4i by A inch 3 

1 by I inch 9 

Bearings: 

Cross-head, complete 2 



I by finch 18 

2| by 1} inches 18 

Crank pin, ash hoist 2 

Crank pin 1 

Rod, low, main current 1 

RevoUdng, stand, ash hoist 2 

Brass, blower engine, 3} by 5 inches, split 2 

Brass, blower engine, 4 by 3f inches, solid 4 

With lines, set 2 

Bolts and nuts: 

f by 3} inches 15 

A by 1} inches pounds. . 7 

"JV hy 3 inches , do 5 

Assorted do 15 

f by ^ inches do 20 

f bv 4 inches do 4 

^ by 31 inches do 20 

i by 4 inches do 40 

1 by 2 inches do 50 

1 by IJ inches do 10 

Stove, J inch 1, 000 

3 by 10 inches 3 

iinch 400 

Assorted 1ft 

C. B. brasses — 

1 set of 5 5 

2 sets, 4 bolts 4 

2i by i inches pounds. . 70 

3 by t inches do 15 

4 by i inches do 32 

3 by I inches do 2 

21 by I inches do 20 

3 by I inches do 40 

4 by i inches do 2 

5 by f inches ". do 60 

2 by I inches do 45 

21 by f inches do 40 

3 by I inches do 25 

5 by finches ...do 5 

7 by J inches do 50 

2 by 1 inches do 45 

4 by f inch do 16 

21 by f inch do 38 

2 by I inch .' do.... 20 

1 by f inch do 8 

2 by i inch do.... 25 

11 by } inch do 14 

31 by finch do 20 

3 by f inch do 2 

21 by finch do.... 2 

1 by 1 inch do.... 120 

i by 4 inches do 25 

1 to If inches do 100 

3} by finch, DE do.... 10 

21 by finch, DE do.... 10 

Assorted do 50 

2 by I inch do 4 

1 by I inch do 5 



1504 SHIPPINQ BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Bolts and nuta— Continued. Qiuiiatj. 

€by } inch pounda.. 15 

5 by i indi do 10 



.y i inch do 40 

by 4 inch '. do 16 

Jinch do 3 

r 4 inch do 25 

2'by'iinch do 24 

3 by j inch do 50 

34 by i inch do 48 

4 by finch do 175 

4i by i inch do 5 

5 by finch do 8 

4 by 1 inch do 6 

2 m jinch do 40 

Sibyl-inch do 80 

5 by linch do 100 

4 by 1 indi do 15 

3 bv I inch do 30 

4| by 1 inch do... . 4 

6 by linch do 112 

Buomet«re, Gennan 6 

Bonnets, water end, complete 2 

Boba: 

Metal, If inches 2 

Stuffing, 5i by 21 inehea 2 

Bottoms, journal 2 

Hydraulic .-.- 2 

Valve for ice machine 3 

Bladei, hacksaw. -. --■.■■■,■ 135 

Blocks, anvil, 3 by 2i inchei 14 

Bits, drill: 

Steel 3 



a vy ^ 1111:1 

21 by i int 
2lnr line) 
6) by lint 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1505 

Bits, drill— Continued. Quantity 

finch « 

1-inch , H 

fi-inch 1 

^inch 1 

Braces: 

Iron, tri&ngle, 20 by 15 by 5f inches 150 

Wood, hand 2 

Breafit — 

18-inch 1 

15-inch 1 

Brackets, door 2 

Brass: 

Round, solid — 

2^ inches by 8 feet bars . . 2 

1 J inches bv 5 feet do 1 

l| by 9 inches do 1 

Hexagon, solid — 

2 by 6 inches do 1 

I inch bv 9 feet do 3 

1 i by 4 inches do 1 

Bars, grate, 41i by 5 by 1 J inches 5, 027 

Brass, hexagon, J by 8 inches bare . . 1 

Boards, asbestos, 32 by 6 by 2 inches 50 

Bricks: 
Fire — 

9 bv 4i by 3 inches 8. 629 

Broken 350 

Anchor 1,400 

9 by 4i by 2i inches 1,757 

Side linere, 8 by 4i bv 3 inches 1, 176 

Bath .' 7 

Brushes : 

Tube wire 74 

Boiler tube. 1 by A ^<^^ ^^ 

Paint, No. 7, rubber set 6 

Tube cleaning 224 

Wire handle 70 

Boiler, 22 feet 81 

Wire 38 

Duflt 51 

Grease 12 

File 16 

Scrubbing, deck 1 

Wire, boiler. 12 feet 96 

Clothes 1 

Boiler, tube, 1{ by IJ inches 250 

And handles, wire — 

10 by 9J inches 11 

7 inches by 14 feet 8 

Brace: 

Iron, double — 

9 feet 6 inches by 2\ inches 1 

9 feet 6 inches by 4^ inches 1 

Grate iron bars, 2 feet by 11 inches by 3 inches 5 

Iron — 

Flat. 7J by li by i inches 101 

Round, 7i bv 5J by I inches •. 85 

An^le iron, 20 by 20 by 20 by 2 inches 11 

Boxes, and covers, manhole, 3 by 3 feet 6 

Brooms, corn 8 

Buckets: 

Galvani7e«1 iron, 3 gallons 323 

Steam trap, cast — 

N>. 4D 4 

No. 5D 6 



1506 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Biiphinpi: Quantity. 

Re<liirine. 3} to 3 inches 5 

Hexagon — 

2\ by } inches II 

2 by 1 J inches 4 

German, 2J by I inches 10 

Brass, 2i by J by J inches 22 

Leader, pipe — 

3 inches 1 

I h inches 2 

Threaded, 3 by 2 inches I 

N'alve ohamber, 3J b v 3 inches I 

3^ bv 2i inches ' 1 

3} by 2| inches 1 

lU bv H inches 3 

Fiber. 3-inch 500 

Stop, cast-iron. 4 by 2h inches 1 

(last ir()n. 6i by 5 inches 2 

Burlap bags' 2 

Cable: 

Insulated rubber feet . . 3 

Wire- 

i inch p )unds . . 50 

Galvanized iron — 

1 inch fcof. . 8 

J inch do. ... 10 

('alipers: 

36 inche.s. outside 3 

24 inches, inside 2 

Candles, tAllow: 

9i by 3 inches 178 

4 by 1 1 inches 80 

1 inch pounds . . 25 

(Jans: 

Galvanizefl iron. 2-gall()n 2 

('opper, 2-gallon 2 

Oil— 

A-piut, brass 4 

1-pint, brass 1 

Tin— 

2-gallon I 

Squirt, oil. 2-quart 1 

Brass, squirt, oil 1 

Nickel, oil, complete 20 

Brass, oil, complete 3 

Caps: 

Valve chamber — 

Small 4 

Large 4 

Leather cone 40 

Round, leather 27 

Joiu'nal 2 

Gland, cast iron 1 

Cast iron, 7 by 6i inches 1 

Brass — 

l}-inch pounds . . 60 

}-inch do 35 

Rubi)er, for ^eajse cups 555 

Iron, 5 by 2 inches 1 

Oast bronze: 

18 by 4 inches 6 

6 by 4 inches I 

Cards, file 2 

Cast iron: 

6 by 6 inches 1 

12 by 84 inches 1 

16 by 6 inches 2 

'*es, door 2 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1507 

Chains: Quantity. 

Galvanized iron, |-inch feet. . 300 

Hydraulic block, 1-inch length . . 1 

Iron, 1-inch feet. . 20 

Rigeing, asBorted sizes 7 

Oiain ^Is, Gennan type 31 

Cliain falls and tackle, 1-inch 2 

Checks: 

Trap and seat, l^-inch 17 

Niim1)ered, brass, l^-inch 2, 500 

fbisels: 

Cape, large 18 

Wood— 

9-inch 2 

6-inch 1 

2-inch 1 

C'ape, small 15 

D. P 94 

Flat 13 

Round-nose 25 

Packing 7 

Cold HI 

Scaling 4 

Straightedge — 

6 by 1 J inches 8 

5 by l| inches 2 

3i by 1 inch 1 

11 by 2i inches 2 

Cement, iron, Smoothon pounds. . 20 

Clainpe: 

Slip, 11 by 11 by 1 inch 8 

Iron, }-inch 47 

Beam . 12 by 10 by 3i by 1 inch 1 

Head, 10 by 9 inches 4 

Hand. 8 by 54 inches 1 

10-inch 10 

9-inch 12 

H-inch 7 

('-3 3 

12 by 9 by 2 inch 1 

Steel , Hnch 8 

Cocks: 

1-way, }-inch 12 

2-inch 11 

Brass, drain, ^-indi 30 

Cockpits, brass: 

i-inch 3 

J-inch 5 

5 by} by J inch 5 

CoIlaTB: 

Brass, 2} by i inch 1 

Steel, 1} by } inch 148 

Thrust 4 

Clamp, 2-inch 8 

Brass, safety-valve, 2| by H inches 50 

Compound: 

Crater pounds.. 2 

United Stetes Navy, standard do. ... 200 

Condenser, 1-inch 4 

Connections: 
Brass — 

Sibyjinch 10 

.Assorted 10 

Double end^- 

4 by J inch 14 

2 by 2 inches 66 



1508 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 

Connections — Continued. 
Bra«8 — Continued . 

Double end— Continued. Quantity. 

3 by 1| inches 5 

li by } inch pounds. . S 

3i by finch do.... 10 

Galvanized iron — 

Assorted 45 

Pipe, li by J inch pounds. . 18 

Pipe— 

IJ by J inch do 5 

3 by i inch do 10 

^ by f inch do 10 

Column, mercury 1 

Connections, vaive, 18 by 4 by 2J inches 1 

Couplings: 

Reducing 9 

Female for U-inch tubing 5 

Steel, 4} by 3 inches 3 

Reducing, 3J by 1 J inches 2 

Gooseneck 8 

Galvanized iron pounds. . 30 

Assorted sizes do 25 

IJ-inch 30 

Brass — 

2-inch pounds. . 40 

J by } inch do 2 

Tapered 6 

Counters, revolution: 

|-inch 6 

Circulating pump, 8-inch 2 

Mamin^in, Aschauft, 8-inch 2 

Container, tin for oil, capacity, 4 gallons 2 

Covering: 

Felt i pounds. . 10 

Floor, duck, 12 by 10 feet 5 

Covers: 

Manhole — 

18-inch 2 

24 by 19i by 1| inches 16 

Scupper, 11 by 8 by 1 inch 20 

Ash ejector 2 

Water tank, 11-inch 2 

Crayon, white boxes. . 20 

Crossheads: 

Piston, steam windlass 2 

Steel— 

9 by 4 bv 4 inches 3 

Pins and nuts, 4 by { inches 2 

Complete, ash house 1 

Brasses, sets 20 

Complete 2 

Crowbars, steel, assorted sizes 5 

Clips: 

Valve 25 

Glass, oil — 

Brass fittings 3 by 3 inches 2 

Nickel-plated fittings 6 by 5 inches 2 

Silometer 1 

Oil, with copper pipe 22-inch 1 

Cutters: 

Pipe, No. 1 2 

Pipe H bv J inches 8 

Die, 1 -incli 2 

(tauge, glaas 3 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1509 

Cutters — Con tinued . 

Die — Quantity. 

IJ-inch 3 

l|-inch 5 

Glass 1 

Cylinder: 

Head, 15 by f inches 4 

Head 5 

Head, ash-ejector pump 2 

Head, steam ' . 2 

Head, lugh-power 1 

Connection 1 

Cover — 

High power I 

German 1 

Desks, oak: 

31 by 23 by 5 inches 2 

31 by 23 by 4 inches 2 

Dies: 

If-inch 2 

l-inch 2 

Kound, f -inch '. 1 

Square, 1 j-inch 1 

Round, 1 |-inch 1 

Square — 

1^-inch 1 

If-inch 1 

1 j-inch 2 

1 J-inch * 2 

1-inch 1 

H-inch 1 

ll-inch 1 

Numbered. 26 to set 1 

Disk: 

Gears, dynamo, copper — 

1-inch 2 

31-inch 2 

5-inch 2 

Valve, brass, 4-inch 4 

Valve, brass 60 

Copper, 5i by 4 inches 22 

Valve — 

Brass, 7 J-i°ch 4 

Train copper, 6} by ^ inches 151 

Brass, 4J by 4J inches 1 

Dividers: 

12-inch 2 

24-inch 2 

Dogs: 

And handles 63 

For doors, complete — 

Back 115 

Side r 372 

Grips 19 

Aah doors 14 

_ Ash doors, 18J by 2J by IJ inches 2 

Drills: 

6-inch 1 

Ratchet, pneumatic 2 

Head 1 

Ratchet, 23 by 10 inches 5 

Electric, hand, 110 volts 4 

Hand 2 

Breast 3 

Breast, 16-inch 1 

Ratchet ] 

Electric, screw center 4 



1510 SHIPPING liOARD OPERATIONS. 

Drills — ContiDued. 

Round — QnanUty. 

2-inch 1 

}-inch 1 

Shank, square, set 1 

Assorted 110 

Machine — 

Tapered shanks — 

11-inch 7 

Itt-inch d 

1-inch 1 

liV-inch 2 

l^^inch 1 

lA-inch 2 

lA-inch 4 

1-iV-inch 4 

lA-inch 1 

lA-inch 1 

jfrinch 2 

|-inch 1 

liV-inch 1 

1-inch 8 

ii-inch 12 

ll-inch 5 

Sinch 7 

-inch 2 

U-inch 4 

H-inch 2 

H-inch 3 

fj-inch 1 

H-inch 9 

A-inch 1 

|}-inch 2 

J-inch S 

A-inch 2 

A-inch 2 

A-inch 

fj-inch 

A-inch 

li-inch 

*i-inoh 

A-in<'h 

Il-inch 

I J-inch 

,Vinch 

Steel, i by i inch 

Drips, brass air pump 

Dynamo, type ''Simplex,*' Form B, me 5, No. 5309, volts 120, amperes 16, 

revolutions 475, shunt current, 14 B. F. Sturtevant & Co., Boston, Mass 1 

Elbows: 

Steam pipe, 3 by 6 inch 3 

Galvanized iron — 

2 by 1 inch 20 

6 by 4 inch 4 

Reducing, i by | inch 50 

Iron, return, 3 by J inch 12 

Brass, return — 

24 by i inch 104 

l^inch 7 

Brass, 5 by 2} inch 7 

Ells: 

Brass, assorted, 2i by J inch pounds. . 20 

Brass, assorted, f-inch do 20 

Brass, assorted, If-inch do 35 

Iron, assorted, f by J inch do 25 

Iron, assorted, |-inch do . 30 

Brass, i-inch !!.!.'.... do.... 5 



SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 1511 

£niery: 

Qoth-- Quantity. 

No. J quiree. . 9 

No. do 7 

No. 2 sheets.. 100 

No. 1 quires . . 33 

No. 2} do.... 9 

CroccuB do 1 

Grounds pounds. . 5 

Grounds, No. 40 cans. . 8 

Grounds, No. 120 pounds. . 12 

SxjMuiders, tube, 3J by 2 inch 8 

Sxtmguiahers, fire, 5 gallons, Foamite 3 

Fan: 

Electric, 8-inch 1 

Ventilating, 36 by 16 inch 1 

Casing, galvanized iron, 19 by 10 inch 1 

Casing, galvanized iron, 4 foot 10 inch by 4 foot 4 inch 2 

Fkucets, brass: 

Oilcan 17 

Valve attached, 12 by 1 inch 2 

Valve attached, 3J by -ft inch 1 

Feeders, brass, coil, capacity 1 pint 2 

Ferrules, condenser, f-mch 500 

FUe: 

Bat-tail 1 

Baster, J-inch round, 21-inch 1 

Flatr— 

8-inch 6 

12-inch .' 2 

6-inch..., 12 

10-inch 16 

16-inch 6 

13-inch 1 

9-inch 15 

14-inch 2 

Half round — 

16-inch 5 

3-inch 5 

24-inch 1 

Round — 

8-inch 2 

12-inch 10 

22-inch 1 

Drill, 6-inch 1 

Rasp, square, 16-inch 2 

Hall round — 

14-inch 3 

12-inch : 8 

lO-inch 3 

Aflsorted 30 

Round, bent, 16-inch 19 

Square, smooth, 14-inch 11 

Round, smooth, 12-inch 3 

Square, smooth, 10-inch 3 

Square, assorted 40 

Round, assorted 27 

Flat, assorted 76 

Triangle, 8-inch 5 

Fitting: 

Pipe, assorted, small poimds. . 120 

Fire door iron, 24 by 18 by 9 by 3 inches 1 

Pump, brass, screws and handles pounds . . 50 

Flanges: 
Blank— 

11-inch * 1 

12J.inch 3 



1512 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

FlangM — OontiD ued . 

Blank— Continued. Quantity. 

7i-inoh S 

7-inch I 

7 J-inch 1 

9-inch 2 

2i-inch 1 

6-inch 2 

Braae — 

10-inch 4 

4J-inch 4 

Metal, 2Hnch 2 

Copper, 6-inch 18 

Iron, 16 by 12 by 1 inch 1 

Flux, welding, aluminum ^ s cans. . 4 

Foimtain, water and trap, with 2 fountain tine 1 

Frames, ash ejectors, pump 4 

Funnels, tin I 

Gas. outfit, complete set. . 1 

Gaskets: 
Punch — 

J-inch 1 

1-inch I 

}-inch 6 

li-inch 2 

li^inch 2 

J-inch 1 

T^inch 2 

}-inch I 

Fiber, manhole, 16 by 10 by } inch 15 

Copper — 

Corrugated 50 

Assorted 175 

Rubber — 

6bviinch 14 

8Jby 3Jby J inch 16 

Copper, 11| by 7 1 inches 5 

Manhole, tank top-^ 

15 by 12 by 1 J inches pounds. . 60 

14 by 10 by 1 inch do 67 

Handhole, 7 by 8}^ by } inch do 225 

Lead, 11 by 41 inches 4 

Hydraulic pump, 5 by SJ inches 14 

Copper — 

5-inch 15 

6-inch 2 

5 Hnch 38 

5f -inch 45 

6-inch 80 

5A-inch 25 

Steel— 

6-inch 2 

5}-inch 2 

3i-inch 175 

3i-inch 53 

Fiber, l}-inch 50 

Rubber, l}-inch fiO 

Fiber, IJ-inch 25 

Rubber — 

3i by 2 inches 25 

I by J inch 8 

Gauges: 

Clearance, lower L. P. head 1 

Radio, lower L. P. head I 

Bridge and case 1 

Steam, 7-inch face I 

Pressure, Schaeffer & Buddenburg 2 

Master, German 1 



SHIPPIlfO BOARD OPERATIONS. 1513 

Gauges — Continued . 

GlftflB — Qoantlty. 

1 bv 36 inches 1 

18 fey j inch ft 

14 by I inch 420 

Vacuum, 8-inch face 70 

Pressure 6 

Oepth, German 31 

Br;;aB — 

Assorted 50 

Water, 10 by 4} inches 10 

Steam 18 

8-inch I 

6-inch, glass face '. 75 

Rotating, German 2 

Water test, 7-inch 3 

Brara valve — 

J-inch 1 

} -i nch 2 

i-inch 2 

Glass, ground, can pounds. . 14 

Coarse do 17 



Grinding pairs. . 12 

Lubricator 9 

Sight 11 

Moncreif , 18 by } inch 807 

Gland, stuffing box: 

Small 1 

Lftige 1 

Hanuners: 

Brick, 1-pound 12 

Copper, without handle 1 

Bnck, i-pound 2 

Lead, without handle, 20-pound 5 

Chipping, iron, 1-pound 13 

Blacksmith, 1-pound 2 

Brass, maul, 3-pound 1 

Copper, 3-pound 1 

Iron, 1-pound 1 

Handles: 

Valve 2 

Hammer 1 

Pile 20 

Pump — . 

27 by 6 inches 1 

27 by 9i inches 1 

Valve, 15 by IJ inches 1 

Hammer, wood, 16-inch 23 

Wood, file 10 

Door, G. I ^ .31 

Door 2 

Iron, 84 bv 4 inches 6 

Head: 

For slice shoes 74 

Valve, 10 by 14 inches 1 

Hinges: 

Boiler door — 

« by 34 inches 14 

6 by 2 inches 12 

16 by 2 inches 25 

Hoe: 

Fire— 

10 inches long lengths . . 1 

18 inches long do 221 

14 inches long do 5 

16 inches long do 15 

Heads, no handles, 12 by 5 inches 151 

ITTOea— 20— PT 4 18 



1514 SHIFPINQ BOABD OPERATIOKS. 

Holder: 

Anvil, 28 by 8i inches 1 

Die and handles, No. 3 , $ 

Hooks: 

Baffle 7S 

Tapered 150 

Grapple 12 

Hose: 

Rubber — 

Water, f-inch pieces.. 9 

Wire, 1 i-inch feet . . 48 

Water pipe, 3-inch lengths.. 27 

Wire bound — 

}-inch feet.. 16 

li-inch • do 12 

Tanvas, water, 2}-inch do 50 

Rubber, water, {-inch do 25 

Canvas, water, 3-indi do 100 

Rubber, air— 

1-inch do 25 

1 J-inch do 150 

Hydrometer 1 

Iron: 

Soldering pounds. . 8 

Copper do 1 

Sheet, 75 by 34 by A inch I 

Scrap pounds.. lOO 

Angle- 
Sheet , 28 by 12 by lOJ inches 1 

For nozzles 6 

Iron bases, anvil, 20 by 14 by 11 inches t 

Jack, hand, 12-inch 1 

Junk: 

Copper pounds . . 400 

Brass do 800 

Iron do 2,275 

Bronze dj 200 

Steel do 75 

Brass fittings do 100 

Nuts and bolts do 80 

Spelter do 100 

I^der, iron, 8-foot 1 

I^agging, handrail for asbestos bundles. . 7 

Lampfl; 

Bulkhead 10 

Portable, electric 8 

Lampblack pounds. . 2 

I^the: 

Center 1 

German. 1913, complete, 12-foot 1 

I/odge & Shipley Machine Tool Co., complete 1 

Tools- 
Forage — 

Boring 10 

Turning 9 

Special 6 

Cutting off 14 

Facing 12 

Dogs 10 

Lead: 

White pounds. . 115 

Sheet, tV inch feet. . 8 

Scrap pounds. . 28 

Reil, powdered, 1-pound cans 25 

Light, ywrtable, electric, 9-foot cable S 

Lime, chloride pounds. . 120 

Liner, back, casting, 17 by H by 3 inches 1, 600 



SHIFPINO BOABD OPBBATIONS. 1515 

Liners: 

Si<Je — Quantity. 

Casting, 14 by 10 by 4 inches 2, 229 

Brick, 6 by 4 by 2i inchee 127 

Check — 

Casting — 

42 by 6i by li inches 164 

26 by 8 by 5 inchee 139 

26 by 8 bv 5 inchee 83 

23 by 16 by 4 inches 10 

36 by 6i by 5 inches 12 

Top— 

14 by 9i by 7 inchee 163 

14 by 9 by 7 inchee 91 

Front— 

24 bv 6i by 5i inches 13 

22 by 18 by i inch 27 

25 by 6 by 6 inches 1 

Brass, sheets, .2000 to .7000 feet pounds. . 80 

Litholine do 130 

'Locker, wood, 2 glass doors, 23 by 22 by 6 inches 1 

LnbiicatorB: 

Steam, Detroit , 2 

Complete : 2 

Lye, cans pounds. . 3 

Mallets: 
Iron — 

15-pound 2 

25-pound 1 

Wood— 

5-pc)imd 1 

2|-pound 2 

i-pound 2 

] -pound 4 

Moulders, wood turned 3 

M. B., brasses 1 

Manganeeite cakes . . 3 

Mask ammonia 1 

Metsd: 

Babbitt X>ound8. . 1 

White, sheets — 

27 by 4 J by A Uich 62 

26by3jbytCinch 77 

27 by 6 by tV inch 60 

27 by 2f by A inch 86 

Molds, double leather cut, SJ-inch 2 

Nails 8D pounds.. 60 



Nippies: 



Double, 3| by 3i inches 12 

2 

7-inch 5 

6 by 1 inch 47 

3Jbylinch 61 

4i by 1 inch 55 

5 by finch 112 

IJ by finch 75 

61 by} inch 160 

4i by} inch 33 

3 by If inchee 85 

2}-inch 23 

6 by 2 inches 3 

Nozzles: 

Pump, for oil 15 

BiasB, fire hoee, 3-inch 3 

Head, HP, Varhol-v-Ankerspill 2 

H. D. R. starboard 1 



1616 



SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 



IfozzleB — Continued. - 

M. D. V. T. starboard 

B. B. port 

Dynamo 

Iron — 

2Hnch 

li-inch 

Braas, l]^-inch 

Steel, f-inch 

Iron, j-inch 

Braas, f-inch 

Hexagon, 11-inch 

Square head, 8 by 2 inches 

Propeller — 

18-inch, new 

18-inch, old 

Stern gland 

Hexagon, 1-inch 

Steel, 1-inch 

Hexagon^ IJ-ii^^li 

Brass — 

J-inch , 

f-inch \ 

IHnch 

IJ-inch, lock 

Piston, rsh-ejector pump 

i-inch pounds. 

Hexa^n — • 

1-inch do. . . 

i-inch do. . . 

i-inch : do. . . 

Tftr-inch do. . . 

i-inch do. . . 

f-inch do. . . 

f-inch do. . . 

1-inch * do. - . 

i-inch ^ do 

y hy IJ inches do. . . 

A by A inch do... 

Brass — 

1-inch do. . . 

J-inch % do . . . 

li by f inch do. . . 

Iron, assorted do. . . 

Oil: 

Neptune gallon . 

Cotus do. . . 

Spica do. . . 

Aicid do... 

Ultra do... 

Ursa do. . . 

D. T. E do... 

Cylinder do. . . 

Oil lard do... 

Packing: 
Flax— 

j-inch pounds. 

J-inch do. . . 

I-inch do . . . 

finch do. . . 

1-inch do. . . 



u&aCity 



Tux- 



i-inch do. 

I-inch do. 

J-inch do. 

f-inch do . 

finch do. 



1 
1 

4 



16 
64 
32 
10 
370 
500 
16 
16 

2 
2 

3 

19 
o 

36 

9 
30 
90 
45 

2 
12 

27 

23 

10 

10 

17 

70 

45 

4 

3 

25 

5 

75 

25 

25 

5 

324 
344 

IP ^ 

DO 

215 

174 

60 

2,120 

17.7 

88 



44 

23 

38 

269 

3 

4 

7 

12 
27 

7 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1517 

Parking— Continued. Quantity. 

Fiber, scrap bin. . 1 

Sheet, pilot, }-inch , square feet. . 81 

Sheet, dark — 

A-inch pounds. . 120 

A-inch do 15 

Pilot, Hp. spiral — 

i-inch do 32 

A-inch do 2 

Fiber do 45 

Pilot, Hp. spiral — 

i-inch do 4 

1-inch do 44 

}-inch do. . 1 . 45 

l}-inch do 74 

U-inch do 6S 

Bull dog- 
Spiral, 1-inch do 70 

l{;inch do 80 

2-1 nch do 92 

Steam tube — 

H-inch do.... 102 

2-inch do 115 

Spiral, oil, J-ii^ch do 20 

t-inch do 15 

Rubber — 

Hydraulic — 

1-inch do 70 

J-inch do 52 

f-inch do I 

Sheet, 48 by 36 by 116 inches do 1 

Flax, sheet, J-inch do 4 

Rubber — 
Sheet— 

f-inch , do 1^ 

}-inch do 5 

|-inch do 10 

1-inch do 10 

Collar, gum — 

1 by jjinch .' do 30 

1 by Jinch do 15 

H by i inch do 16 

J-inch do 40 

Sinch do. -. . 80 

Hnch do 40 

J-inch do 10 

i-inch ■- do 5 

1 i -inch do 50 

t-inch do 32 

i by A i'lch do 15 

i round, )4nch do 5 

ApbePtoe — 

Sheets, 40 by 40 by 3 inches sheets. . 20O 

Pipe — 

36 by 31^ inches do 10 

36 by 8 inches do 9 

J-inch poundp. . S 

Rubber — 

Tube, scrap do 10 

Sheet— ^ 

24 by 21 by } inch 1 

27 by 22 by i inch 1 

24 by 16 bv 14 inches 1 

3 feet by -ft inch ". . . .^eets. . 15 

Ciraphite— 

-inch • pounds. • 4 

-inch do 3 



1518 SHTPPTNG BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Packinflf-Oontinued. 
Rubber — 

Sheet, (fum— Quaatfty. 

36 by 30 by A inch 1 

24 by 16 by i inch 1 

Asbeeto— 
Rope — 

J-inch pounds. . 800 

1-inch do 75 

J-inch do 6 

Sheet, 48 by 42 by } inch aheeti . . 36 

Wick, ^inch pounds. . 2 

Pump set. . 4 

Fiber, f-inch 48 

Graphite, j-inch feet. . 3 

Casco sets. . 20 

Pans: 

Dust 19 

Copper, drip, 27 by 13 by 3 inches 1 

Paint, aluminum gallon. . 1 

Paint pounds. . 60 

Paint, drum do 75 

Paste: 

Metal do S 

Metal liquid pints. . 9 

Petrolatum '. pounds. . 10 

Pillar, end for motor circulator 1 

Pinions, steam windla»4 4 

Pins: 

Brass, hinge, 3J by { inch 150 

Dowel, 4 by 1 J inches 1 

Steel, 2i-inch 2 

I ron, 2| by } inch 8 

Steel, wrist, 3-inch 4 

Steel, 7-inch 3 

Pipe: 



32 by J inch 1 

18 by if inches 1 

1 1 J by 1 J inches 1 

BrasB, 3 feet 6 inches by f inch 1 

Copper, 4 by 3J inches 1 

Holders, U-inch pounds.. 50 

Galvanized iron — 

7 feet by 4j inches 1 

10 feet 4 inches by 3 inches 1 

21 feet by 3 inchrs 1 

13 feet by 3 inrhns 1 

10 feet by 3 inchw 1 

4 feet 6 inches bv 3 inches 1 

34 feet 6 inches oy i inch 1 

8 feet by IJ inches 1 

Copper — 

Flanges on each end 1 

3f by 2J inches 1 

10 by 9 by 2 inches 1 

Piston: 

Water end, 9}-inch 4 

Steam — 

11 f-inch 5 

No rings, IS^-inch 4 

With nngs, 15J.inch 2 

Ring for loose parts, l&i-inch set. , 1 

Rods, ash houst 1 

Ring and rod, 16 by 1) inches 2 

and rod, 9 by 1} inches 2 

1 




BHippnra boabd opbbatioiis. 1619 

Piston — Continued. Quantity. 

Water, aah ejector 1 

Steam 1 

Steam — 

Complete 1 

No follower 1 

Steel, 5i-inch 6 

H. P., 8-inch 1 

L. P., 14i-inch 1 

Steam, Crerman 2 

Water end.. : . . 2 

Plaice: 

Sur&u:e — 

large 1 

small 1 

Gop]>er, liby-^inch pomids.4 6 

Screw, No. 504, taps, die, stock, f to J inch set. . 2 

Glass, 6 by lOi inches 7 

Angle, 8-inch 1 

Zinc — 

12 by 6 inches 1 

10 by 6 inches 25 

Surface — 

10 by 6 inches set. . 1 

12 by 8 inches do 1 

4J by 2 inches do I 

2i by 2) inches do 1 

12 by 6 by I inches do 2 

Valve, braas, 6 by | inches 13 

Pire door, 19 by 13 inches B 

Valve h«ad, 18 by 14J inches 1 

Head, 16 by J inches 1 

Iron — 

38 by 27 by f inch 24 

18 by 13 by i inch 2 

Iron floor — 

30J by 28 inch 8 

31i by 12i by 7* inch 2 

Iron, head, 22^ by 18 by finch 44 

Gauge, German, 17 by 4 inches ^ 1 

Dovetail, 10 by 3i by i inch 8 

Indicator 6 

Name, 6 by 3 inches 7 

Plane: 

Draw 1 

Wood, smoothing, No. 3408 1 

Plugs: 

Brass, screw — 

J-inrh pounds. . 5 

J-inch do 3 

t-inch do 5 

Iron screw, l}-inch do 21 

Galvanized iron, 1-inch 97 

Wood, tapered, 16 by 7J by 4} inches 1 

End . 4-inch 1 

Brass— 

1-inch 1 20 

l^inch 10 

f-inch pounds. , 10 

J-inch do 1 

^•inch do 3 

|-inch do 2 

H-inch 86 

l|-inch 14 

2i-inch 35 

4 by 2 inches 2 

Ferrule condenser, l-inch 17 



1520 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 

Plungers: QnmtitT. 

1-inch 6 

1-inch 1 

H-inch 1 

Pump, ballast 2 

Complete, water end 2 

Post, anvil: 

16by Sinchee 1 

15 by 2 inches 1 

14 by li inches 2 

Potash cans.. 2 

Potassium, chromate Tbnnces. . 3 

Pots: 

Stock, retinned, 5-gallon capacity 2 

Copper, melting, 3 by 3 incnes 1 

Stone, melting, 16 by 12 inches 2 

Puller: 

Valve seat ^ 

Stud, 3-inch 3 

Valve 1 

Pulleys: 

Shafting, 4 to set, 12 to 4 inches I 

Shafting, 16 to 4 inches 3 

Steel, 8 by 51 inches.... 2 

Wood, 6-inch 3 

Chain, hydraulic — 

10 by 8 inches 1 

17 by 6 inches 1 

1 1 by 10 inches : 1 

Pump, brass, hand, oil 6 

Punches: 

Drill 5 

Gasket — 

H-inch 1 

fj-inch 1 

1-inch 1 

J-inch 1 

Steel, 6-inch 1 

Quadrons 2 

Ratchet, watertight door 1 

Reamers: 

6.inch 14 

10-inch 1 

14-inch 2 

12-inch 5 

8-inch 1 

i-inch 1 

Tapered — 

IJ-inch 1 

ll-inch 1 

1-inch 1 

No. 10 4 

No. 9 4 

No. 2 

Straight, German, 38 to 16 mm set. . 1 

Assorted, 2-inch to l^-inch 20 

Reducers: 



I by finch 127 

Ifbyljinches 40 

21 by i inch 26 

If bvlj inches 10 

U by 1 inch 106 

} by finch 116 

I by i inch 30 

« by J inch 124 

1 by finch 93 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1521 

Reducers — Oontinued . 

Bnifle— Continued. QuanUty. 

IJ byHinchefl 32 

Ifbylinch 26 

2ibylinch 14 

if by IJ inches 8 

l| by } inch 1 

Rini!s: 

J rasB, 2 bv 4 inch 75 

rurtirin, 12 by lOi by } inch 1 

< vlinder — 

14} by 1} inches 3 

14 by 2J inches 2 

14 by 1} inches 2 

15 by 1 J inches 3 

Excelsior, }-inch 115 

Fiber— 

li bvlinch 27 

li by 1 inch 40 

Follower 2 

Gasket— 

2i by i inch 32 

2l by i inch 4 

Gland- 
Steam 1 

Water 1 

Brass, 3-inch 2 

Leather, bushing, 2 by 1 inch 137 

Octagon, span — 

3} by 1} inches 1 

5} by 2 J inches 1 

4 by 2 inches 1 

Piston — 

Hi by 12 inches sets. . 4 

14 by H inches 2 

15 by 1 J inches 4 

14 by iinch 4 

2J by 4 inch 4 

9-inch 13 

151-inch 3 

7|-inch 12 

SJ-inch 10 

15-inch 2 

Iron, 3i-inch 3 

Steel— 

9 by 2 inches 4 

7 by 1 inch 13 

18Jby|inch 6 

Double, 3} by i inch 12 

AirhoiBt 4 

Rubber, 1 by J inch 105 

Flicking — 
Tux— 

2-inch 75 

3-inch 48 

Casco — 

2} by 1} inches 18 

61 by 4| inches 14 

3i by 2i inches 3 

3 by 2 inches 8 

2A by Itt inches 4 

2i by lA inches 2 

2|} oy 1} inches 20 

2H by 2 inches 12 

Turns 80 

H by 4j inches 48 



1522 SHIPPING BOARD OPEKATIOKS. 

Rings— Con tinued . 

Packing — Continued. Qnintity. 

11} by lOi inches 1 

MetaUic, 3} by 2i inches set.. 1 

Fibe1^— 

15J by 13} inches 10 

12 by 10 inches 4 

12-inch 20 

12-inch 14 

Rubber — 

2 by finch 81 

3 by i inch 48 

Fiber, 12-inch 12 

Graphite 32 

PI unger 3 

Rubber — 

3-inch 88 

Red— 

2f-inch 50 

3Hnch 24 

3i-inch 50 

2f-inch 72 

2-inch 22 

IJ-inch 12 

Steel— 

10-inch 4 

12-inch 2 

3-inch 24 

Metal, valve, 6-inche8 6 

Brass, IJ-inch 5 

Rods: 

Connecting, 3 feet by ^ inches 1 

Distance — 

16 by li inches 4 

16 by IJ inches 4 

Connecting, brass, 14-inch 1 

Eccentric 1 

For vjdve gear 2 

Piston — 

Steam oil pump 6 

Steam oil pump 2 

Solu pump 2 

Schottchhessaulage 1 

Type not given 19 

Iron, 8-mch 2 

High-power 1 

Key — 

8-inch 1 

6i-inch 2 

Low power 1 

And nut, steam end, 68 by 2J inches 1 

For water end 2 

For steam end 2 

Do 2 

Do 1 

German 5 

Retarders, steel, flat, twisted, 5 feet 725 

Rivets: 
Iron — 

i-inch pounds. . 16 

|-inch do 35 

, Steel, 2} by I inch do 100 

Assorted do 10 

Rope, manila, 3-ply, 2i-inch feet.. 325 

Rubber, scrap pounds. - 126 

Ruler, wood , 24 inches 5 

Saw, hand 3 



SHIPPIKG BOARD OPERATIONS. 1523 

Screws: 

Stud and bolt— Quantiny. 

2 J by 1 inch pounds . . 17 

2 by iinch do 14 

1 J by J inch do 4 

Brass, round head — ' 

3f by i inch do 8 

7 by I inch do 15 

Lag, brass— 

5J bylfiiich do 20 

liby^inch do.... 25 

Machine, flat head — 

Brass, i-inch do 3 

1-inch do 2 

Round, IJ-mch 1 .do 2 

Machire, round head — 

1 J-inch do 1 

2-inch do 10 

}-inch do 18 

li-inch do 19 

1-inch do 2 

J-inch do 5 

Plug, tapered, li by 1} inches do 120 

Machine, flat head, brass. No. 20 do 3 

Packing 28 

Iron, double end — 

3-inch 3 

4 by f inch pounds. . 30 

Brass, double end, 4 by J inch do 3 

Brass, flat head, wood, 2? by i inch 37 

Cap, bronze, 3 by IJ inches 2 

Assorted pounds. . 10 

Packing — 

}-inch do 1 

}-inch do 1 

Iron, 8 by 2J inches 1 

And nutB, double end — 

5 by J inches : pouuds . . 5 

3 by 1 inches ....do 6 

3 by I inches do 5 

4 by IJ inches do 3 

"5 by 1 inch do 1 

5 by i inch '. do 2 

i-incn do 15 

Brass, thumb do 60 

Iron, iV-iuch do 60 

Screw drivers: 

• 17-inch 1 

8-inch 2 

1.5-inch 2 

14-inch 2 

19-inch 2 

12-inch 2 

10-inch 2 

20-inch 2 

24-inch J 

6-inch I 

21-inch 7 

9-inch 3 

5-inch 5 

26-inch 2 

13-inch 5 

»crew jack, J- ton: 

8-inch 3 

20-inch 1 



1524 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Srrew«et: Quantity. 

1 J by J inch pounds. . 2 

2 Dv A inc^ ^^ ^ 

1 J bv A ^^^^ <^o 1 

2 by* i inch do 10 

2 by J inch do 2 

H by I inch - do 5 

\i by ^inch do 5 

Not finiphed — 

3 by I inch do 8 

5 by iV inch 5 

4 by J inch 5 

2| by i inch 5 

2i by i inch 2 

IJby iinch 2 

Scales. English: 

3-foot 1 

6-foot 1 

Shacklefl and bolts: 

1 J-inch 6 

5 oy } inch 1 

7 by 1} inches 1 

Assorted 38 

Iron — 

4finch 2 

6-inch 2 

Scrapers: 

Pain 1 

Ship, triangle ^ 

Iron, 10-inch - 

File , 1 4-inch 49 

Seat' 

Safety valve, brass, 4tV by 3A inches 10 

Vaive — 

6 by li inches 1 

10 by 1| inches 1 

Shaft: 

Worm— ^ . . 

34 by t inches 2 

23i by 1} inches 1 

Shaftings: 

Steel pulley— 

18 by 4 inches 2 

5 by 4 inches 1 

For pulley, 26 by 2J inches 2 

And bracket, 16 feet 1 

. Steel pulle/T- 

12 by 6 inches 2 

8 by 6 inches 2 

10 by 6 inches 1 

And bracket— 

4 feet by 2J inches 1 

2J feet by 2J inches 1 

4 feet by IJ inches 1 

Pulley and bolting — 

24 by 5 inches 1 

12 by 4 inches 1 

8 by 6 inches 2 

10 by i inch 3 

18 by 2| inches 1 

Sbaper: 

German, complete, 3-foot stroke 1 

Pipe— 

21 by 4 inches 1 

24 by 2i inches 1 

20 by If inches 1 

20 by H inches i 



SHIPPIHO BOABD OPEBATIOKS. 1526 

Screen: Qiiantity. 

Wire, 30 by 12 inches 1 

BraBB, 36 by -fg inch pounds. . 10 

Copper, 36 by 16 inches do 70 

Brass, 36 by 24 by ^ inch, sheet 1 

Wire, 2 feet by J indi, roll 1 

Shears: 

Trimming, 6-inch cutting edge 2 

Tinner's — 

8-inch jaw 1 

14-inch jaw 2 

6-inch jaw 1 

4i-inch jaw 3 

Shields: 

Ash, door. 36 by 34 inches 30 

Manhole, 42 bv 32 by 20 inches 13 

Ash, door, 24 by 19J inches 2 

Shovels, coal, 14-inch 8 

Silver, nitrate ounce. . 3 

Spring: 
Piston — 

5 by 2 inches 8 

2|byTVinch 23 

Valve. Solu pump 8 

Valve 5 

Valve , brass 100 

Brass — 

3J by 2 inches 20 

3i by 2 inches 303 

3i by 2 inches 10 

2i by 14 inches 25 

Steel, 10 bv 4 inches 1 

Relief .... .' 26 

New 10 

Assorted 5 

Iron, 4J by 2 inches 3 

Springs: 

Iron( 3 by 2 inches 5 

ReUef 6 

Sets 24 

Brass, assorted pounds. . 160 

Spirts, brass, f-inch 8 

Stamers: 

Hose, suction, 8 by 4 inches 4 

Brass — 

Suction — 

2J by IJ inches. 2 

6 by 4 inches 1 

16 by 4 inches 1 

13 by 4 inches 1 

3 by finch 3 

Pump, lubncating 3 

Air suction pump 10 

Stands: 

Vidve, Solu pump 2 

Grindstone, 6 by IJ inches 1 

Squares, steel, German, 33 by 23 inches 2 

Sodium, carbonate pounds. . 1 

Spindles: 

Valve, brass, 17 by 2J inches 2 

Condenser, 17 by f inch 4 

Steel, 8 by i inch 5 

Valve, 27 by 1 inch 16 

Brass, 3i by i inch 12 

Spreader, 13 by 4 inches 1 



1526 SHIPPING BOABB OPERATIONS. 

Steel: 

Round — Qumtlty. 

} inch by 6 feet bars. . 1 

I inch by 7 feet do 2 

Hexagon — 

} inch by 9 feet do 2 

i inch by 9 feet do 2 

1 inch by 8 feet do 3 

H inch by 10 feet do. ... 2 

Flat, i by 1 i 1 nc h by 5 f ee t do.... 2 

Hexagon, 6 foot by 1 inch do 1 

Flat— 

If by } inch by 5 feet do 1 

l| by I inch by 3 feet 3 inches do 1 

Round — 

} by 12 inches do 1 

J inch by 10 feet do 1 
leled — 

2 by 1 inch blocks. . 2 

1 by § inch do 2 

^ ^y i i^ch do 2 

1 by IJ inches do 2 

30 by 3 inches bars. . 1 

2 by 2 feet blocks . . 1 

Stems: 

Main and auxiliary — 
Feed stops — 

11 by 1 inch 44 

13 by li inches 3 

Check— 

11 by 1 inch 39 

8 by } inch 23 

Stem stop, 13 by 1 inch 38 

Brass, for grease cups, 4 by J inch 39 

Piston 2 

Piston, German 2 

Slings, wire, 6-ply 2 

Sticks, packing 3 

Stocks and dies: 

Machine screw stock, dies and taps set. . 3 

For No . 1 pipe , U. S . N do ... . 1 

For No. 2 pipe, U. S. N do 2 

For No. 3 pipe, U. S. N do 1 

Complete, IJ inches to i inch do 1 

For No. 2 machine do 3 

For Litt le Giant machine do 3 

Stocks, 11 by 3^ inches 2 

Stone, emery: 

Smooth, 6 by 1 inches 1 

Rough, 6 by 1^ inches 1 

Strong back for ventilator, 12} by 2| inches 1 

Studs, steel: 

3 by J inch pounds . . 25 

2iby Jinch do.... 40 

2} by i inch -. do 3 

6 by 1 inch 17 

For packing gland, 17 by IJ inches 32 

3 by I inch pounds . . 40 

3 by I inch .do 5 

2 by I inch do 2 

Studs: 

Iron, 8i by 1} inches 2 

Square head, Solu pump, 6 by } inches 8 

Piston, dummy — 

5} by 1} inches 7 

5} by If inches 2 

8 by 2 inches 2 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1627 

Studs — Contin ued. 



Quantity. 

5 by 1 inches 2 

4 by 1 inches 250 

Bearing. 12 by 3i inches 2 

Cap, 1 2 by 3 inches 1 

15i by 5 inches 1 

With coUare— 

^ by IJ inches 19 

4 by 1 inches 14 

Peking gland, 4 by IJ inches 46 

Iron, packing gland, ^ by J inch 200 

Studs and nuts: 

Iron, 6-inch 2 

16 by 9 inches 2 

21 by 2} inches 2 

6 by J inch 1 

2 by finch 100 

Studs: 

Assorted .• 29 

Screw and nuts, 4 by ) indi pounds. . 20 

Screw brass, double end, 4^ by f inch do 60 

Brass do 100 

Stiara: 

Eccentric seta . . 2 

Iron. 22-inch 1 

Brass, hose. 2i-inch 31 

IWiometers, brass, 4f-inch face-i 2 

Tallow pounds.. 470 

Tanks: 

Steel, oxygen, empty, 30 by 14 inches 1 

Brass, oil — 

26* by 7i inches 1 

3 &ucets — 

2 feet by 20 by 8 inches 1 

26 by 19 by 6 inches 1 

Taps: 

Pipe— 

1-inch 2 

i-inch A. J 1 

12 by A inch 1 

i-inch A. S 1 

J-inchZ. P 1 

16 by finch 1 

i-inchR 2 

i-inch No. 13 6 

IhinchNo. 11 7 

finch No. 10 13 

j-inchNo. 9 4 

finch R 3 

finch 6 

2-inch 1 

If inch R 2 

1-inch No. 8 9 

IfinchNo. 7 1 

If inch R 2 

2-inch R 3 

IfinchNo. 7 1 

finch 5 

fmch 2 

-, 1-inch 1 

Tape, metal feet.. 100 

Tarpaulin 1 

Tees: 



8J by 5J by 2 inches 1 

finch pounds . . 7 



1528 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Tees — Con tin ued. 

Brsfls— Continued. Qowitity. 

1-inch pounds. . 81 

If-inch do 10 

4-inch 4 

li-inch 30 

Iron— 

1-iiich 2 

i-inch poundB. . 3 

j-inch do 4S 

Copper, j-inch do 10 

Galvanized-iron, j-inch do 5 

Thermometer, brass, feed water, Varholu-Ankerspill 3 

Thermometer 3 

Thermostats 2 

Toggles, adjustable 4 

Tongs: 

Chain, 24-inch 1 

Rivet- 

2 feet 6 inches : 1 

18-inch 1 

Chain, 36-inch 1 

Foi5ginff- 

10-inch 13 

18-inch 2 

Tools: 

Hydraulic cup set. . 16 

Packing, assorted 28 

Combination boring bar 1 

Knurling 1 

Thread holder, Armstrong 1 

Holders, drill 3 

Cutting. Agrippz, J. H. Williams 3 

Torch, plumber, keropene, 1-gallon 2 

Trammel : 
Steel— 

14-inch 2 

36-inch 2 

Tray, brass, oil, 2 feet, 2 inches, by 1 foot 1 

Trowels: 

Iowa, 15-inrh 5 

9-inch 14 

7-inch 2 

4-inch 2 

10-inch ] 2 

Tubing: 
Brass — 

18by 1 inch 1 

9 by 2} inches 1 

Pointed. J-inch feet . . 20 

Boiler, 11 feet by If inches 1. 472 

Braes, 9 by 2J inches 1 

Tumbuckle and screw, 16-inch * 1 

Unions: 

H ydraulic 8 

Brass — 

1 i-inch 7 

2i-inch 3 

If-inch 10 

1 J-inch 1 

l|-inch 1 

iX-inch pounds. . 50 

1-inch 11 

Hnch 36 

i-inch 2 

J-inch 80 

5 by 2 inches 2 



SHIPPING BOARD OPBRATIOKS. 1629 

Unions — GontinueH. 

Brass— Continued. Quantity. 

Hexagon, f-inch pounds. . 10 

1-incn do 10 

J-inch do 5 

Iron — 

I^-inch 30 

5 by 2f by J inch 1 

Galvanized iron — 

J-inch pounds. . 5 

ll-inch 3 

i-inch 1 

1-incb eO 

Washtub, 24 by 10 inches 1 

Waste, cotton ^ 130 

Wedges: 

For thrust boring — 

24 by 3 inches 2 

14i by 4i inches 8 

Thrust 4 

Wei^t: 

balance — 

20 kilo, 6 by 5i inches 1 

lO-inch 1 

Door, 12 by 8 by 4 inches 3 

Wheels : 

Emery, No. 36, auxite carborundum, 2-inch 1 

Emery, No. 3, auxite carborundum 3 

Cast iron, 7-inch .' 2 

Worm, 6 by 4 inches 1 

Grind, sand, 8-inch 1 

Bufiing — . 

25ich 1 

1-inch 2 

Emery, carborundum, No. 1 2 

Steel, solid, 8J by 5 inches 1 

Brass valve, 7-inch 27 

Iron valve, 7-inch 2 

Valve, 10-inch 1 

BaiTow — 

Bodies, 31 by 24 by 7 inches 16 

Wheels 16 

Legs— 

17 by 3i inches 2 

16 by 2 inches 30 

Handles — 

Brace, 21 by 2i inches 26 

Tube, 6 feet 6 inches by 1 inch 16 

Bodies, 3 feet by 2 feet 2 inches by 6 inches 2 

Wheels, 16 by 1| inches : 2 

Braces, 18 by U inches 9 

Sockets, 4i by 1 J inches 10 

Wicking, cotton balls. . 3 

Wire: 

Lead spools.. 13 

Copper- 
No. 36 do 2 

tV-ioch pounds. . 5 

No. 1 do.... 17 

Bnw, ^inch do ... . 10 

Cable, 3-ply do.... 30 

wnatpm, crosshead 4 

^ttn, worsted hank.. 1 

AOkes 2 

^okes, stud, 4i by g inch. . . . . . . . ... ..................... ... ...... .pounds. ! 50 

177068— 20— PT 4 19 



SHIFPnTQ BOABD OFBBATIOKS. 



Vklveetem: 

22 by 11 incfaM. . 

23 by l] inchet. . 
27 by 1 inch 



by i inch 

by 1 inch 



2ibyU 
11 by li 



8 by }inch.. 
Wrench: 

Single end — 
1-inch 

f-inch 



1 -inch.NoVieV. 
1 by 1 inch 

1 



SpecifJ, 2-inch 

No. 12, 1-inch 

^inch 

24by 4iDCbe0 

2by li inches i 

11 by {inch 

1} by linch, aaeorted.. 
2} by 1 inch, sMorted.. 

{-inch, spider 

1 J-inch, spider 

l-iuch, snake 

1-inch crowfoot 

2i-inch, alligator 

li-inch, alligator 

Double end — 



hoi.. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1681 

TVraich — Cantmued. 

Socket^ Qmntlty. 

f-indi 2 

2f-ixich 2 

l-inch 23 

l^indi 3 

}-inch 7 

12bylf inchee 1 

l|-incfa 3 

2-iiich 1 

li^inch 3 

l^inch 8 

f-inch 4 

l-inch 7 

l-inch 1 

2^inch 2 

8-incb and fittings 1 

15ibylinch 1 

l-inch 3 

If-inch 1 

f-inch 3 

Special, 14-inch 5 

lo by 1} inchee 1 

Special, l^-inch 3 

if-inch 1 

2|-inch 1 

Special. 3-inch , 2 

lj-{nch 1 

f-inch I 

Square, ^indi 1 

2J-inch 1 

10 by 1 inch 1 

2-inch 3 

2}-inch 1 

16 by 3 inches 1 

5 by 2 inches 1 

i-inch 1 

l-inch 14 

End, i by 1 inch 11 

Open end — 

Small 7 

IJ-inch 1 

Large 9 

2i-inch ' 2 

Double end, 2 by 1} inches 24 

Open end — 

2i-inch 2 

3i-inch : 1 

24 by 4 inches 1 

10 by 2 inches 1 

20 by 2i inches 1 

l-inch 2 

8 by 3 inch 1 

2-mch 4 

1 J inches 2 

Assorted — 

li by IJ inches 7 

18 by 2J inches .^ 1 

15 by 1} inches .' 1 

15 by li inches 1 

For- 

3-inch glands 4 

3i-inch glands 1 

l}-inch glands 3 

H inches 22 

1} inches 9 

If inches 6 



1532 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Wrench — Oontinued . 

For— Continued. QnMUiy. 

1-inch 12 

}-inch $7 

i-inch 5 

16 by 2 inches 2 

12 by 2J inches 1 

18 by 2i inches 1 

24 by 3} inches i 

J-inoh 18 

t-inch 5 

1| inches 3 

2i by 1| inches 2 

Key— 

i-inch 5 

6 by J inch 1 

2-inch 1 

If-inch 4 

If-inch 1 

1^-inch 5 

2-inch 1 

IJ-inch 4 

H-inch 4 

IJ-inch 1 

i-inch 1 

1 -inch 4 

18-inch 3 

Brass, Ifinch 3 

Double, 1 by } inches 1 

Special — 

14 by 2} inches 1 

24 by 2i by J inch 1 

3} by i inch 1 

1 by J inch i 1 

12-inA 1 

Spanner — 

J-inch 2 

7 by 2 inches 1 

7 by 2 inches 1 

1 2 by 2 inches 1 

6 by IJ inches 1 

Monkey — 

144nch 14 

18-inch 6 

20-inch 4 

15-inch 1 

16-inch 14 

12-inch 30 

10-inch 8 

8-inch 17 

24-inch 4 

ABBorted 16 

Torpedo air pump 3 

Ox)en end, assorted 10 

Spanner 6 

Special — 

28-inch 1 

Square, f-inch 1 

Socket. 14-inch 1 

Double ena — 

2 by li inches 1 

18 by 2 by 1} inches 2 

18 by 2i by 1} inches I 

Plate, special, 0-inch 2 

Skeleton, 6-inch 4 

Box, assorted 17 

Tool holder, assorted 9 



SHIPFIITQ BOARD OPBEATIOHS. 



Wiendb — Condnaed- 

Itonnd-hwd, 3eby Sinchea 

Box, 27 by 5 indtes 

Iron, 8 by 2 iochee 

Round, hud, 2by lAii'<*« 

Specul, 4i-mch 

Qennma type: 
Wroncb— 

Oct«gon, ipui, 5) by 1} inches. . 
Octaicin — ■ 

51 by Uinchea 

4iby 2iiicheB 

5f by 2 iocbee 

4Jby 2iiicheB 

5|by 2inchee 

51 by 2^ inchee 

54 by 2 iDchee 

4i by 2imchea 

4} by 2incbefl 



H«x^oii, Bpui, 6} by 2 

2by liDchea 

2(by 1} inches 

ij by I inch 

"iby " ' icheo — 

iby ichee 

*hy :h 

,by: :h 

II by ichee 

" by ichee — 



4Iby 4|iDcheB.. 

2f by 1} inchee... 

2) by ll inchee... 

2} by li inches... 

l|by If inchee.. 

12 by 2} inchee.. 
Bearing— 

2* by li inchee 

21 by li inchee 

4 bv li inchee .'.. 

4} by IJ inchee 



Star— 



I inchee. . 



4^ by 2| inches.. 
3j by li inchee.. 
si by^ inches. . 



1584 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

Gennan type — Continued. 
Wrencn — Continued . 

Stilflon— Qnmttty. 

24-inch 15 

le-inch 16 

8-inch 1 

14-inch 1 

12-inch 15 

30-inch 5 

Rachet — 

12byli inches 1 

30-inch 3 

22-inch 1 

Snake — 

24 by 4 inches 1 

Ifinch 3 

12 by li inches 2 

If by If inches 1 

24 by 2i inches 1 

U-inch 1 

Crowfoot 1 

Crowfoot — 

2}-inch 1 

IJ-inch '. 5 

iVu^ch 6 

Rachet, If by 1 inch 1 

Star— 

6|.inch 1 

5-inch 1 

54-inch 2 

4}-inch 1 

5|--inch 1 

6-inch 1 

Star, iV-iQ<^^ ^ 

Hexagon — 

If by lit inches 1 

if by A inch 1 

1} by 1 inch 1 

4 by f inch 1 

If by 1 J inches 1 

2-inch 2 

9J by 3} inches 1 

12 by 3J inches 1 

Uibyiinch 1 

Elbow— 

2i^inch 2 

1-inch 5 

Washer, 7 by J inch 4 

Washers — 

Fiber, 2i by f inch 200 

Asbestos, f-inch 25 

Rubber, If by f inch pounds. . 26 

Assorted, If by J inch do 24 

Rubber — 

1 by } inch do 15 

t 4-inch do 35 

inch do 5 

inch do 50 

f-inch do 20 

J-inch 1 do 12 

rinch .do 16 

inch do 15 

1-inch do 20 

Weights, door 3 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1585 

Valve: QiUiirlty. 

Aflih^ejector pump ^ 

Pomp i 8 

Cast iron 36 

Globe— 



^inch 4 

4f>mch 14 

li-inch 2 

finch 2 

Si>eciAl 10 

Assorted 11 



f-inch 2 

1-inch 42 

finch 9 

i-inch 2 

1-inch 8 

Ifinch 1 

J-inch 1 

t-inch../. 1 

finch 36 

2finch 3 

Ifinch 11 

2-inch 7 

finch 6 

finch 4 

1-inch 10 

3-inch 1 

• If inch 18 

If inch 9 

Check 11 



finch 10 

finch 40 

If inch 16 

finch ; -. 1 

tinch 6 

inch : 2 

If inch 6 

1-inch 10 

2-inch 3 

If inch 4 

Ifinch 1 

81-inch, No. 12 8 

8finch, No. 14 12 

Bteam, H inches 1 



18 by 2* inches 2 

7Jby4by*u>cli 2 

lOJ by 4J by 1 inch 1 

l-inch 2 

SHde 4 

Gennan &.... 1 

Shifting 6 

Stem casing, 3-inch 1 

Pump, water, M-inches 11 

Brass, aYmf— 

Ifinch 1 

1-inch 4 

Ifinch 9 

8-inch 3 

4 by 1 inch 1 

6-inch 653 

Governor, brass, dynamo 6 



15S6 8HIFPIN0 BOABD OPBBATIOirS. 

Talue— Contmued . 

Hydraulie- QoMttty. 

7f byliinchea 43 

11 by 1} inches 2 

21 by 1} inches 4 

Weetinghouee, large 2 

HP 2 

Pocket and stem 6 

CroBshead, 4-inch 4 

Gate— 

IHi^ch 3 

6 by 3J by li inches 1 



Hnch 2 

f-inch 5 

Hnch 11 

IHnch • 

2-inch 1 

Hnch 9 

f-inch 2 

f-inch •. 34 

{-inch 7 

Rubber, 8-inch 107 

Hard— 

5i-inch 1 

5i by 1 inch - 20 

Iron — 

6 by 1 inch 5 

7 by i inch * 

8 by IJ inches 10 

7 by 4 inches 1 

3-inch 1 

Way, 4 by li inches 1 

Lifter, 15-inch 1 

Hot water, 6} by | inch 4 

Assorted 48 

Piston and stem 1 

Piston ash ejector pump 2 

Piston, complete 1 

Suction and discharge ^ 

Gfinch 28 

German 1 

Complete sets. . 12 

Angle — 

Brass — 

j-inch 2 

J -inch ^ 

-inch 1 

l-inch 10 

2-inch ^ 

l-inch 4 

}-inch 1 

i-inch 12 

f-inch 10 

Release, 2Hnch 1 

Cushion, brass, IJ by f inch 50 

Water gauge — 

i-inch ^ 2 

l}-inch 1 

Tri cock, brass, 4 by i inch v ^ 

Safety, 20 by 2 J inches 2 

For ice machine 3 

Brass, 4-inch 2 

Receding machine 4 

Receder, Simplex 1 

ReduciiLg, li oy 1 inch 1 

Valve stem, brass, 13 by } inch : 2 



SHIPPING BOARD 0FERATI03fS. 1537 

Valve seat: Qouitlty. 

8 by 2 inches 1 

2 by li inches 6 

And guards 22 

Valve etiardfl 56 

Vise: 

Bench — 

6-inch 4 

36 by 20 inches / 2 

4-inch 3 

20 by 5i inches 3 

23 by 10 by 5i inches ; 3 

24 by 18 by 6i inches 2 

36 by 18 by 6 inches 1 

16 by 8 by 3 J inches 1 

Drill press, 6-inch 1 

Hand- 
is by 5i by 3 inches 3 

20 by 10 by 5} inches 2 

Rpe— 

16-inch 1 

24 by 18 by 61 inches 1 

12 by 9 inches 1 

15 by 8 inches 1 

14-inch 1 

9-inch 2 

Vise j aw, 2^-inch 1 

Valve stem, brass, 16-inch 8 

Valve seat: 

Aah-ejector pump 24 

Solu pump 8 

Main air pump, ^inch 312 



5-inch 4 

6^inch 2 

51-inch 2 

4-inch 7 

Monel metal 13 

20 

With q;>rin£s 19 

With fi^uan^ sets. . 12 

Complete 10 

40 

|-inch 2 

li-inch 28 

Ifinch 17 

3^inch 7 

Valve stem: 

Varhol-u-Ankerspill 1 

6 

21 by U inches 2 

2-inch.. 3 

fbyiinch 3 

30-mch 2 



24 by 3 inches 17 

14 by 2 inches 17 

Compressor 18 

6 

finch 11 

Ash ejector pump 3 

Piston 6 

CGHDdplete 4 

With check nut, complete 1 

5 by linch 1 

22 by 1 inch 1 



1538 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 

Valve stem— Con tmued . Qjantity . 

Gennan 10 

Spare parts for, German, comppeasor (not on board) stem, valve 1 

Bolts, 13 feet by 1 inch 2 

Bearings connecting rods 6 

Coupling jaws I 

24 by 1 inch 24 

SUPPLEMENTARY. * 

Beeswax cakes. . 3 

Brass: 

Sheet — 

14 by 8 by } inch pounds.. 1 

14 by 9 inches do 1 

12 by 6 inches do 1 

Sheeting — 

lOibv 4 by | inch 1 

25 by 14 by I inch 1 

14 by 12 by I inch 1 

Blowtorch: 

Gasoline 2 

Gasoline, 1 gallon 3 

Kerosene, 10-inch, complete 1 

Brass, hand 2 

Compressor: 

Parts for German compressor, stem valve 1 

Bolts, 13 by 1 inch 2 

Bearings, connecting rod 6 

Coupling jaws 1 

Copper: 

Sheet, 12 by 12 inches pounds. . 1 

Sheathing — 

24 by 12 by A inch 2 

36 by 20 by T^r inch 1 

40 by 36 by -S i^ch 1 

Cotter pins: 
Brass — 

16 by 1 inch pounds. . 5 

2bvtVinch do 5 

IJ oy A inch do 3 

2 by -^ inch do 3 

} by 1 inch do 3 

1 by I inch do 1 

IJ by! inch do.... 1* 

li by 4 inch do.... 1 

1 i by I inch do : . . . 5 

2 by 4 inch do.... 2 

1 by -^ inch do 8 

24 by A inch do.... 2i 

2 Dv tV inch do 7 

2i by fjf inch do 8 

1 by J inch do 4 

1 J by ^ inch do 4 

2 by i inch do 4 

2} by li inches do 2 

3 by iinch do.... 3 

1 by -Jj inch do 1 

3 by -A- inch do:... 5 

Steel— 

1} by t*^ inch do 2 

2 by -^ inch do 3 

2 by j^ inch do 8 

I by i inch do 1 

1 by I inch do 2 

IJ by i inch do 3 

llby i inch do 3 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIOITS. 1589 

Cotter pina — Continued. 

Steel— ContinueiJ. QuaBtity. 

If by J inch pounds.. 3 

2 by (inch do 2 

1 b V A iJich do J 

1 i by A iiich do 3 

2 by Aiiic^ do 1^ 

2 J by ^ inch do 3 

1 by } inch do 4 

li by } inch do 5 

2 by i inch do 5 

2 J by i inch do 6 

3 by i inch do 8 

2 by -JV inch do 7 

2i by A ^^^ do 5 

3i by -jV inch do 3 

3 J by i inch do 4 

4 by 3i inches do 3 

6 by i inch do 3 

4bv^ inch do 4 

No.'S 200 

No. 8 436 

Drill press, Gennan, 6 feet 1 

Expanders, tube set . . 1 

Grindstone: 

1 foot 6 inches by 6 inches 1 

Electric, 2 emery wheels, attached; Ciren Electric Co 1 

Lampwick rolls.. 3 

Lampwick, }-inch pounds . . 1 

I^ad, sheet, 8 by 6 inches do 5 

Bubber, 36 by 32 by J inch 1 

BaiB: 

Anvil, 181 by 2 by 2 inches 1 

Clinker, 12-foot 7 

SUce— 

12.f6ot 60 

14-fe)ot 18 

2a.foot 1 

Blades and section for high-powered turbines 80 

Blades and section 70 

Blocks; 

Gidde for thrust-bearing wedges set. . 1 

Die— 

If-inch -. 1 

2i-inch 2 

2|-inch 1 

And tackle, 1-inch chain. 2 

Blue, Prusnan can. . 1 

Board, bulletin, 3 by 5 feet 1 

Boxes: 

Metal, If inches 2 

Stuffing, 5i by 2i inches 2 

Brackets, gauge 9 

Brushes, 2-inch 6 

Bushings: 

leader pipe, IJ-inch 2 

Brass, hexagon, i by 8 inches 1 

Cement: 

Cans . 20 pounds each 24 

^ Rubber pounds. . 100 

foliar, brass, 2i by i inch 1 

^Pper, 32i by li by i inch bars.. 8 

^^P«i Rrease, oraas: 

Albany, 2i by li inches 16 

2-inch 4 

^on, and handles 32 

Drills, machine, tapered shank, l^-inch 5 



1640 SHippnsro boaxd ofebations. 

QmBtity. 

Elbows, return, 1* by 2 inchee 71 

Gftuffes, vacuum, bnas 4 

Hooks, pacloDg 84 

Hair, nudden coil pounds. . 1 

Nuts, aawvted do.... 100 

Packing: 
Sp&al— 

i-inch do 4 

1-inch do 3 

)-inch do 1 

l^inch do 4 

f-inch do 2 

Pipe, G. I., ^-inch feet.. 344 

Piping, G. I., 2i-incli thread 4 

Pump: 

Water 1 

Oil 4 

Reducers: 

Brass, IJ by I inch 200 

Elbow, iron, 3i by 2J inches S 

Bangs: 

Piston— 

3|byiinch 9 

3| by finch •. 9 

Springs: 

IJ by linch 3? 

liby linch 3 

Steel: 

by 1 by linch ban.. 4 

by 1 by 10 inches do 3 

2 by 2 by 8 inches do 1 

li by 21 by 10 inches do 1 

i by 6i by 6 inches do 1 

1} by 8 inches, round do 1 

2i by 8 inches, round t -. do 1 

ijby 12 inches, round do 3 

li ^^y 14 inches, round do 1 

3 Dv 6 inches, round do 1 

Stems, brass, 16-inch pounds.. 4 

Sulphate, alimiinum 4 

Swabs: 

Deck 4 

Piston 4 

Threader, pipe, 2-inch set. . 3 

Valve stems: 

24 by linch 24 

1 J by 2 inches 16 

If by 23 inches 1 

1 by 27 inches 27 

Washers, 1 inch pounds . . 75 

Wire, lead 1 do.... 20 

Wrench, monkey, 17-inch 1 



I 



SHIPPING BOABD OPBBATIOHS. 



1541 



Exhibit B. 

S. B. ** Leviathan," 
OmcB OP THB Chisf Stewabd, 

January 19, 19t0^ 
Ytomi Chief steward. 
To: Chief of CoDStruction. 
Subject: Inventory of silverware. 

1. Herewith inventory of silverware aboard above steamship as of this date: 

8ILVEBWARK, RFTZ CABLTON BB8TAUBAMT. 



4 meat platters, 16 inches. 

8 meat platters, 18 inches. 

9 bread iX9,ys, 12 inches. 

2 8. P. deeps, 19 by 7} inches, with 
covers. 

4 8. P. deeps, 12 by 8} inches. 

2 fruit compots, 1 poor condition. 

4 cake dishes. 

9 fruit compots. 
17 oyster forks. 
53 fruit knives. 
76 butter knives. 
243 dinner knives, steel. 



217 dessert knives. 
453 dinner forks. 

63 fist forks. 
160 dessert forks. 

40 fruit forks. 

60 dessert spoons. 
136 soup spoons. 

1 soup ladle. 

2 casserole dishes, 1 with cover. 
1 sauce boat, with bottom. 

1 sugar bowl. 

1 date dish. 

1 service platter, 19^ by 14^ inches. 



FIBBT-CLASS 8ILVERWARB. 



101 vegetable deeps, 8 inches. 

19 vegetable deeps, 8} inches. 
118 bread trays. 
281 meat flats, 14^ inches. 

38 meat flats, 16| inches. 

13 meat flats, 10 inches. 
281 meat flats, 104 inches. 

4 round cake plates, 12 inches. 
168 hot-cake plates, 8 inches. 

10 sunr BcooiM. 
3 coffee spoons. 
341 oyster forks. 
577 nut picks. 

12 butter knives. 
584 fish knivee. 
112 fish forks. 

25 pkkle forks. 
209 fmit knives. 
285 bottoms for menus. 



246 dessert forks. 
730 dinner knives. 
84 dessert knives. 

12 soup spoons. 
42 dessert spoons. 

177 dinner forks. 

14 soup ladles, 3^-inch. 

30 soup ladles, 3-inch. 
204 sugar tongs. 
108 sauce boats. 
4 au gratin dishes, with covers. 

13 cream pitchers. 
1 sugar bowl. 

8 hot-water pots, 7 with covers. 
1 8. P. hors d'oeuvre dish. 

14 first-cabin dinner knives, poor condi^ 

tion. 
6 dessert knives, poor condition. 



SBCONIVCLASB BILVBBWABB. 



53 meat fiats, 16-inch. 

48 meat flats, 15-inch. 

66 meat flats, 9f-inch. 

SO meat flats, lOf-inch. 

15 vegetable deeps, 10|-inch. 

11 vegetable deeps, 9-inch. 

27 frmt compots. 

2 Boup ladles, S^-inch. 

2 ice cream knives. 
117 dessert forks. 



21 soup spoons. 

22 dessert spoons. 
4 coffee spoons. 

2 spoons, sugar sifter. 
33 sugar tongp. 
836 dinner kmves, steel. 
185 bread and butter knives. 

4 sugar bowls, no covers, 3i;-inch. 

7 sugar bowls, no covers, 3-inch. 

1 flower vase, 12-inch. 



25 nutcrackers. 



MISGBLLANBOITB 8ILVERWARB. 

1 game press. 



B. N. Macphbbsom, 
Chief Steward S . S. *' Leviathan.'* 
J. 8. Stantbr. 



1542 SHIFPIKa BOAfiD OPBRATIOKS. 

R. L. IIaoui — ExmBiT C. 

Contract made this 17th day of December, 1919, at the city of Waabington, D. C. 
by and between the International Mercantile Marine Co., a corporation otganixed 
under the laws of the State of New Jersey, party of the fint part (hereinafter caOed 
the agent), and the United States Shipping Board Emenencv Fleet Corporatioa, 
a corporation oiganized under the laws of the District of Columbia (representing^ 
the owner of certain steamships and hereinafter called the owner), party of the 
second part; 

Witnesseth: 

1 . The a^ent agrees to supervise the prenaration of plans and specifications for the 
reconstruction, repairing, and outfitting of the steamer Leviathan as a firpt-class pas- 
senger carrier of tne cla^ and type existing prior to acquisition by the United Statea 
and to submit said plans to the owner for approval. 

Said plans and specifications shall belong to the owner. 

The agent agrees to submit at the earliest possible date an estimate of the cost of 
the work . 

2. To secure the preparation of the plans and specifications and the i>erformance 
of the work in acconiance therewith, the agent agrees: 

(a) To contribute on its account, so far as ma^ be necessary, the services and office 
expenses of its executive officers, including chief and assistant chief of constructioxi, 
chief inspector, chief draftsman, superintending engineer, marine superintendent,, 
passenger and freight experts, \dctualiiig superintendent, and other clerical aasiBtanta 
and such other members of agent's regular staff as may be mutually agreed on. 

(6^ To employ for owner's account all additional necessary personnel required in 
connection with the work or maintenance of steamer during rehabilitation, including- 
officers and crew. It may, with the approval of the owner's representative and for 
owner's account, employ technical experts. Any person employed under this pro- 
vision shall be di8charged by the agent on the written request of the owner or hi? 
representative duly authorized for the purpose, but such action is not to be taken 
until after hearing for cause stated before the board of trustees. The owner's board 
of tnistees phall designate the owner's representative, who shall be authorized to 
approve for the owner plans, specifications, contracts, purchases, etc. 

(c) To negotiate and enter into all necessary contracts for the performance of the 
work and for the plans, materials, machinery, equipment, and supplies tlierefor, U> 
procure all necessary permits and licenses and to obey and abide by all laws, regu- 
lations, and other rules of the United States or of the State wherein work ia done, or 
of any duly constituted public authority applying to such work. All contracts shall 
be in the name of the owner, and all purchases of the amount of $5,000 or over and 
all contracts shall be subject to the approval of the owner. 

((/) To exercise reasonable care in the employment of its own officials and servants 
and of the additional personnel to be engaged for owners account to examine and 
determine that all re^mrs, supplies, and materials will be in accordance with the 
plans and specifications, if any, applying to the same, and of first-class quality and 
workmanship. 

Inspection shall be made under the supervision of the agent's construction depart- 
ment by inspectors employed for this purpose for owner's account. 

ie) To give the owner's representative access at all times to the work, including* 
preliminary plans and work and materxlls in process, whether or not on the vessel, 
and to give the owner full information as to the progress of the work, including monthly 
progress reports. 

3. All persons engaged on the work in pursuance of the foregoing provisions of this 
contract shall be deemed to be agents and servants of the owner and not of the agent 
and the agent shall not be held responsible for the errors or negligence of any of the 
employees of the agent or those employed for the account of the owner. 

The owner shall hold the agent narmless from and against i^ claims or liabilities 
of every kind and nature arising out of or in connection with the work, including the 
cost of defending any such claims. 

4. It is agreed that the title to all materials, machinery, equipment, and supplies 
purchased by the agent for the owner and to all scrap and salvage material resulting 
from this imdertaking shall be in the owner. 

5. The owner shall keep books of account and control, and shall check all expendi- 
tures, including hours of labor. Bills and pay rolls shall be paid promptly by the 
owner, provided the same are also approved by the agent as to the proper character 
of the work done and quality of materials furnished. The agent snail funush the 



SHIFPINO BOABD 0FEBATI0H8. 1548 

owner with a duplicate of all records made by it in the creation of all oblige tionfl for 
the owner's account. 

6. As compensation for the services to be performed by the agent, the owner agrees 
to pay the agent the sum of $15,000 per month from the time of commencement of 
the services until the steamer goes on berth for loading. 

7. The owner aerees to assign the above-named vessel to the agent for operation 
and management ror a period of five years from time vessel goes on berth for loading, 
on terms to be agreed upon, subject, however, to sale of the vessel at any time by 
the owner on 30 days' notice. In the event of contemplated sale, the agent shall 
have first option to purchase the vessel on equal terms. 

8. This contract shall not be transfored by the agent except with the prior written 
consent of the owner. No member or delegate to Congress or resident commissioner 
shall be admitted to any part of this contract or to any benefits which may arise 
therefrom. 

In witness whereof the parties have caused these presents to be executed in tripli- 
cate by their proper corporate officers and their corporate seals to be affixed on the 
day and year first above written. , 

International Mbrgantilb Marine Co., 
By P. A. 8. Frankun, President, 

United States Shippinq Board Embrobncy Fleet Corporation, 
By John Barton Payne, Chairman, 
Attest: 

J. J. Flaherty. 



R. L. Hague Exhibit D. 
construction and repair department. 



Former name, VaUrland. Tonn^, D. W., 16,000; G., 54,282; N., 23,458. Di- 
menaons, 907.5 by 100.3 by 37.8. Water ballast, 5,670. Loaded draft, 41.2. Kind 
of fuel, coal. Fuel capacity, 8,836. Daily consumption, 962. Speed, 24; S. R., 
4832. Fresh-water capacity, — ; feed, — ; potable, —; total, — . Distilling capacity 
per day, — . Prewar passenger accommodations: First, 985; second, 525; third, 848; 
steers^, 1,600; total, 3,958. 

Cubic-bale cargo, 130,600. Grain cargo, — . Number of engines, 4. Type of 
engines. Parsons turbine. Number of boilers, 46. Type of boilers, water tube. 
Number of screws, 4. Horsepower, 90,000. Built by Blohm <fe Voss, Hamburg, 
Gennany, in 1917. 

Plans received: Steam extension, docking plan, half midship section, capacity 
plan, coaling plans, disks (photostat), bunker plan, inboard profile, piping systems, 
method supporting disks, plan of bottom and arrangement of bleeder plugs, propeller, 

f>rofile, graving dock blocks, displacement curves, docking plan, partial disk, trimmer 
ayout, midship section. 
(Here follows a drawing of the U. S. S. Leviathan^ formerly the Vaterlani.) 



April 30, 1920. 

Fiom: Assistant to manager construction and repair department. 
To: Gillis & GeogheganiNew York City. 
Attention Mr. Stapkas. 
Subject: Steam^p Leviathan, 
Reference: Your letter April 29. 

Keplying to your letter of the above-mentioned reference, would advise that the 
specifications and plans for the necessary work on the above vessel are all being 
^dled for the Umted States Shipping Board by the International Mercantile Marine 
^., and we would refer you to them for such information as you may desire. 

Robert W. Bruce, 
Aaristant to Manager Construction and Repair Department. 



1S44 SHIFFIIIG BOASD OFBR&TIONS. 

GiLLa ft GBOOHsaAH. 
JVnr Fort, Ayril t9. I9te. 
AttentioD of tti. Jacob. 
Unitbd States Shipfino Board, 

Divuion ofOperatum. Pauftigrr Skipping Section, 

CoTUtruelian and Repair Dintion, ffeie York City. 
Gkntlbmbn : We would be pleased ta have an opportunity to submit eatiniaU for 
Hie power, heating, and ventilation work, in connection with the overhauling of 
S. S. Levialhan, ana write to aak if you could favor ua with the la«n of plans and sped- 
Hcfttioni for Ihia purpose. 
Hoping for a favorable response, we remain, 
YouTB, very truly, 

GiLus ft Gboobboan. 
W. H. Statles. 

Apra n, I9t0. 
From: AnistAnt to nuuutfer, Constniction and Repair Department. 
To: Law Division. Unitea States Shipping Board, Customhouse, New York City. 
Attention Mr. W. D. Conrad. 
Subject: Steamahip LeviatJum, 

Replying to your memoiBudum of (he 19th instant, we wish to advise that the 
repaiiB to Uie ut bridge of the above-mentioned vessel, necessary on account of col- 
lision, have not yet been made, but we understand that they have been included in 
the apecificationB for the complete repau« necessaiy on this vease], which have heoa 
prepared by the Internationa] Mercantile Marine Co. 

RoBBBrr W. Bbucb, 
AttitUmt to Manager, CoTUtmction and Repair Departmtni. 

April ts. 19tO. 
From: Assistant manager, Construction and Repair Department, Division of Con- 

rtruction and Repair, New York City. 
To: The Commandant, Boston Navv Yard, Boston, Mass. 
Subject: Quarters for personnel of tne estimating party for the Leviathan. 

1. Reference is made to your letter of the 15th instant suggeetiiig that some pro- 
vision be made to lodge and subsist youi estimating party whi^ ia now surveying the 
BteamBhip Leviatiian. 

2. Mr. Gibbs, Chief of construction of the Int«mational Merchantile Marine, who 
also received a copy of this letter, informs me that he talked with you last Moodav oa 
the telephone and explained that it would not be possible for us to take care ol toeae 

3. I am sorry that we can not be of assistance to you in this regard. 

V. V. WOODWAKO, 

Atntlant Manager, Cotatruction and Repair Department. 



Intbbnational Mercantilb Marine Co., 

OmcE OF THE Chief of CoueTRUcnoM, 

New York, April U, 19tU 
p W. Bruce, 

It to Manager CoiutrucCton arid Repair Dtpartmenl, 

iUd States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 
eamahip Leviathan plans and specifications. 

i: Your letter of April 22 has been received and, in accorduice with t#lB- 
ersation with Mr. Dunning, it is understood that no further plans and 
IB will be required by yoti other than those mentioned in your lettw of 

truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 
Agent* for United Stale* Shipping Board Emergent^ Fleet Corporation. 
By W. F. Gibbs, Chief of Conitriiclion. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 1545 

Iktbrnational Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, April 24, 1920. 
Mr. V. V. Woodward, 

Asgistant Manager Construction and Repair Department, 

United States Skipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City, 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan passes for Boston Navy Yard party. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of April 20, requesting passes for party from Boston Navy 
Yard, has been received. 
These paaaee had already been issued on direct request of the Boston Navy Yard. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 
Agents for United States Skipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

By W. F. GiBBS, Chief of Constnuition. 



The Panama Canal, 
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, April 23, 19t0» 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Direetor of Construction and Repair, 

United States Shipping Board, Washington, D. C. 

Sir: My attention has been called to the fact that in the hearings before the Com- 
mittee of Commerce of the Senate, in the matter of the sale of ex-German ships, you 
stated (p. 93, pt. 3, of the hearings) that there was no dry dock at the Panama Canal 
suitable for docking the Leviathan. 

This statement was erroneous, and you are advised that the 1,000-foot dry dock 
at Balboa could handle the Leviathan without difficulty, as it could handle any other 
ahip which has been built to date. As pertinent to this, I inclose a copy of a letter 
I sent on February 21, 1920, to the International Mercantile Marine Co. in the matter 
of dry docking the Leviathan; I forwsurd also copies of the inclosures which accom- 
pttded the letter to the International Mercantile Marine Co. 
RespectfuUy, 

IndoBure: Copy of letter of International Mercantile Marine Co., February 21, 1920, 
tariff No. 3, witn supplements, Panama Canal Record, January 21, 1920. 



April 23, 1920. 
Mr. WiLUAM Francis Gibbs, 

Chief of Construction^ International Mercantile Marine Co,, 

New York City, 

Dear Ms. Gibbs: Thie will introduce to you Capt. A. P. Limdin, of the American 
Balsa Go. 

Oapt. Limdin has just shown me something in the way of wood which I think is 
very interestiag, and I thought probably that you would like to see this treatment of 
balsa m connection with our proposed alterations on the Leviathan. 
Vary siQcerely , 



April 19, 1920. 
I^roin: Assistant to manager Construction and Repair Department. 
To: International Mercantile Marine, New York City, N. Y. 
Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs. 
onbject: Steamship Leviathan, 

1. Kindly furnish this section with five complete sets of plans and specifications 
»>r the above ship at your earliest opportunity. 

RoBBBT W. Bruce, 
Assistant to Manager Construction and Repair Department, 

inoea—ao— PT 4 — 20 



1546 SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 

Division op Opbiultions, 
UNmcD States Shipping Board Bmbbosnct Flbbt Corporation, 

New York, April 77, 19f0. 
Memorandum to Mr. 6. W. Sterling. 
Subject: Issuance of passes to visit LeviofAan. 

1. Attached is letter from the chief of construction of the International Mercantile 
Marine relative to the use of certain Shipping Board passes by individuals other than 
the holders for the purposes of sightseeing. 

2. We have reached a definite agreement with the I . M. M. that we would not request 
them to issue passeB for anyone to visit the Leviathan for sight-seeing purposes, with 
the possible exception of authorized representatives of outK>f-town public organiza- 
tions, such as chambers of conmierce, etc. 

3. This is to ask if you will advise the employees of your department that no passes 
are to be issued for the Leviathan at this time for siffht«eeing purposes, with the excep- 
tions mentioned, in which instances the individuals may be referred to us or we would 
be glad to act upon requests signed by you personally, and it would also be appreciated 
if you would instruct holders of passes issued by you that same are not transferable 
and that they should not be used in visiting the Leviathan except when there on official 
business. 

R. L. Hague, 

Director Divition of Construction and Repairs. 
By W. F. Dunning. 

Copies to Mr. Gibbs and Commander Woodward. 



Division of Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emeegenct Fleet Corporation. 

New York, AprU 17, 19i0. 
Mr. William Francis Gibbs, 

Chtrf of Construction, International Mercantile Marine Co.^ 

New York, N. Y, 

Drah Mh. Gibbs: In response to your communication of April 16, inclosed is a copy 
nf tiinttmrnndum which I have addressed to the assiBtant director of operations, calling 
itifi nf tontion to the misuse of certain passes being held by employees of the Shipping 
Mni^nl. and also advising him of the understanoing reached with you regutiing the 
Iwuanro of passes to visit the Leviathany in order that he may refuse applicants ac- 
nm\iu^\y, and prevent their being referred to your office. 

1 appreciate your having issued similar instructions to your employees and am sure 
Omt all concerned will now have relief from further annoyuice in this matter. 
Very truly, yours, 

W. F. Dunning. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

April 16, 19i0. 

Mr. V. V. Woodward, 

Assistant Manager Division of Construction and Repair ^ 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporatiany New York City. 

Dear Sir: Referring to your recent conversation the following have been invited 
to bid on the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan: Morse Drv Dock Co.; W. A. 
Fletcher Co.; Todd Shipyards Corporation; Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation; 
Newport News Shipbuilding Corporation; New York Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.; 
Wm. Cramp <& Sons Ship & Engine Building Co. 

Specifications have been sent to the following navy yards for their estimates: New 
YorJc Navy Yard, Boston Navy Yard. 
Very truly, yours. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergenai Fleet Corporation, 
By Williams Cranes Gibbs, dnief of Construction. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS, 1547 

International Mercantilb Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, April 16, 1920. 
Mr. V. V. Woodward, Assistant Manager, • 
Conatruetion and Repair Beparimenty 

United States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York City. 

Subject: Leviathan specificatioiiB, Boston Navy Yard. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of April 13 and inclosed letter from the Boston Navy Yard, 
requesting specifications and prints, have been received. 

We have already forwarded seven ^7) additional copies of the specifications and 

EiintB, as they request, and six (6) adaitional copies are being held nere as requested 
y Commander Hayward. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Ernergency Fleet Corporation, 

By William Francis Gibbs, Chief of Constniction. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, April 16, 19iO. 
Mr. W. F. Dunning, Assistant Manager, 
Construction and Repair Department, 

United States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York City. 

Dear Mr. Dunning. Referring to our convereation about the issuance of passes, 
I wish to caXi your attention to the following extract from our records, which indicates i 
that certain holders of Shipping Board passes came on board simply for sightseeing. 
I know you are anxious to cooperate with us in preventing anyone going on board 
the vessel who has not business thereon. Can vou suggest any method by which this 
can be carried out in so far as it may affect the holders of Shipping Board passes? 

March 26, Mr. Frank Eggers, pass No. 115. Aboard 1.25 p. m., ashore 1.36 p. m. 
• March 27, Messrs. W. E. Linden and T. F. Sullivan, passes No. 339 and 342, aboard 
3.20. p. m., ashore 4 p. m. 

April 8, Mr. Frank Creger, pass No. 91, aboard 1.25 p. m., ashore 1.45 p. m. 

In addition to the above, on March 26, Shipping Board Pass No. 152, issued in the 
name of John Naughton, was presented at the eangwav for admission to the ship for 
sight-seeing purposes. The guard did not believe that the holder was Mr. John 
Naughton, and as the specimen signature whidi he made did not agree with that on 
the pass and he could not identify himself to be the person named therein, the pass 
was taken up by us and is being held subject to your disposition. It will be appre- 
ciated if you will look into this matter aiid let us have your views. 

Referring to your recent request, we have issued instructions to all of our people 
that the Snipping Board desires to discourage visitors going on to the steamer, and 
that such people, on applying for permission to visit the ship should be told that such 
is the decision of the snipping Bosml and to be discouraged from applying to you for 
this permission. 

,We would appreciate it, if in turn the Shipping Board would refuse permission for 
visitors to go aooard the ship, and not refer them to this office. This situation has 
arisen several times recently, and has put us in a very embarassing position. 

Appreciating your many courtesies, 1 am, 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

By William Francis Gibbs, Chief of Construction. 



1548 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Division of Operations, 
UNrnsD States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, April 15, 19t0, 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Division of Operation$j New York City. 

Attention of Mr. G. H. Jett. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan, 

The steamsjiip Leviathan was repaired on a time and material basis by the W. k, A. 
Fletcher Co., at New York. 

Repairs to this vessel constituted of furnishing the necessary labor and material for 
inclining test in order to determine the stability curbs. 

The cost of these repairs is now $6,531.38 on a time and material basis. 

It was not considered necessary to submit this work for competitive bids, as the cost 
of this work was estimated to be under $6,000. 

It is therefore requested that you authorize the expenditure of $6,53 1 .38 for repaiis 
to the steamship Leviathan on a time and material basis. 

Chief Inspector, 

North Atlantic District. 

Approved, , 1920. 

Assistant Manager, 
Construction and Repair Department. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, Apnl 16, 19t0. 
Mr. V. V. Woodward, 

Assistant Manager Division of Construction and Repair, 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

Dear Sir: Referring to our recent conversation, the following have been invited 
to bid on the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan: Morse Drydock Co., W. & A. 
Fletcher Co., Todd Shipyards Corporation, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, 
Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., New York Shipbuilding CorporatioD, 
Wm. Cramp & Sons Ship &, Engine Building Co. 

Specifications have been sent to the following navy yards for their estimates: New 
York Navy Yard, Boston Navy Yard. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Aqentsfor Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By WiLUAii FRANas Gibbs, Chief of Construction. 



March 15, 1920. 

From: Assistant manager. Division of Construction and Repair, New York City. 
To: Capt. Wm. J. Ryan, master Steamship George Washington, United States navy 

yard, Boston, Mass. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

We are in receipt to-day of a letter from the Intematioiial Mercantile Marine Co., in 
which thev advise us that the paintings formerly removed from the above ship were 
delivered by them on an order from the United States Shipping Board, to the steam- 
ship George Washington. 

It is requested that you investigate and advise us if these paintings were sent to the 
George Washington, so that we may arrange to have them transferred to the Leviathan. 

V. V. Woodward, 

By , 

Construction and Alteration Section^ 
Construction and Repair Department. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1549 

DivisioK OP Opbrations, 
Unitbd States Shippino Board, 
Emerqency Fleet Corporation, 

New York City, 

MemoTandum to Construction and Alteration Section, Construction and Repair 

Department. 
Attention of Mr. Robt. W. Bruce. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

In regards to your favor of March 15 in regards to several boxes of silverware taken 
rrvn the above-mentioned steamer, we beg to advise that we have absolutely no 
iofonnation regarding the contents of the boxes. 

Last Septeoiber when we were taking inventory in conjunction with the Army, 
we developed the information from Uie naval supplv officer aboard the ship, that 
there were several boxes of silverware placed in the Manhattan Storage & Warehouse 
Co. by the naval postmaster aboard the ship, but in regards to the contents we de- 
veloped no information. 

We advised Mr. Jacob, of the passenger department at that time, all the information 
we had on the subject, and he said it woula be unnecessary for us to go further into 
the matter. 

Daniel J. Crowley, 

Board of Inventory. 

April 15, 1920. 

Prom: Assistant manager, Construction and Repair Department, Division of Con- 
struction and Repairs, New York City. 

To: Mr. Wm. Francis Gibbs, Intematioiial Mercantile Marine Co., New York City. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 
1. For your information I am attaching hereto copy of a letter from the Secretary of 

the Navy to the chairman of the Shipping Board, dated April 15, outlining the position 

of the Navy Department with reference to reconditioning the steamship Leviathan. 

V. V. Woodward, 
Assistant Manager, Construction and Repair Department. 

Enclosure: Copy of letter from Mr. Josephus Daniels, April 12, 1920. 

Washington, April 14y 1920. 
Hon. Josephus Daniels, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washingtony D. C. 

My Dear Mr. Secretary: With reference to your communication April 12, inas- 
much as no definite decision has been reached concerning the necessity of having the 
Work incident to the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan performed at present 
berth, Pier 4, Hoboken, we have forwarded plans and specifications of the said recon- 
ditioning to the commandant, navy yard, Boston, Mass., for the preparation of esti- 
mates in connection with performing the work at the Commonwealtn Pier, Boston, 
And we understand that the Navy Department will submit estimates in accordance 
with your communication under date of April 2. 

In compliance with your request, arrangements have also been made to forwaid 
plans and specifications to the Chief of Operations, Navy Department, Washington. 
Very respectfully, 

, Chairman, 

Prepared by Mr. Hague's office. 

Copy to Commander Woodward. 

Navy Department, 
Washington^ April 14, 1920. 

Dear Sir: In reply to your letter of April 9, 1920, relative to the reconditioning of 
the steamship Leviatnan, there is forwarded herewith for your information a copy of 
letter addressed to the Chairman of the United States Shipping Board relative to 
this reconditioning. 

W. C. Cole, 
Captain, United States Navy. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Direetor of C(mstruction and Repairs, United States Shipping Board, New York, 



1550 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

April 12, 1920. 

Dear Sir: After reconsideration of the proposition of the Navy becoming an inter- 
ested party in the preliminary estimates of tne work incident to the reconditioning 
of the U. S. S. Leviathan, the Navy desires to make its position clear to the United 
States Shipping Board on this matter. 

It is understood that the work in question is quite extensive and would tax the 
facilities of any yard to a considerable extent, especially as regards labor and berthing 
space. 

The size of the vessel prevents her being taken on the navy yaid, New York. 

It is impracticable for the Navy to undertake the woik of reconditioniiig while the 
vessel is at Pier 4, Hoboken. 

It is understood that the Shipping Board does not desire to move the vessel from 
Pier 4, Hoboken, for the purpose of reconditioning. 

The vessel can not be bertned at the navy yard, Boston. 

Under the circumstances outlined above, the Navy does not deem it practicable to 
estimato or undertake the job of reconditioning the U. S. S. Leviathan unless the 
Shipping Board is willing to have the work performed by the Navy at the Concunon- 
wew&i Pier, Boston. 

It is reauested that a copy of the plans and specifications for reconditioning this 
vessel be forwarded to the department for consideration. 
Very respectfully, 

JOSBPHUS DaNISUB. 

Rear Admiral W. S. Benson, 
United States Navy, Retired, 

Chairman, United Statee Shipping Board, Washington, Z>. C. 

April 12, 1920. 

l«>om: AsBistant to manager, Construction and Repair Department. 
To: Morandi-Pioctor Co., Boston, Mass. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 
Reference: Your letter April 9. 

This will acknowledge receipt of vour letter mentioned in the above reference. 
The steamship Leviathan has not been ordered to the Boston Navy Yard for rqMUis; 
as a matter of fact, repairs have not as yet been started. However, the specifications 
are being prepared by the Intomational Mercantile Marine Go. for the United States 
Shipping Hoard, and we would sugsest that you request them to furnish such extracts 
Iroui the Kporifications as may be M^ interest to you. 

Robert W. Bruce, 
Assistant to Manager, Construction and Repair Department. 



April 13, 1920. 

From: Assistant Manager, Construction and Repair Department, Division of Con- 
struction and Repairs, New York. 
To: International Mercantile Marine Co., New York City. 
Attention of Mr. William Francis Gibbs. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan, 

1. Inclosed herewith please find letter dated April 12 from the Boston Navy Yard, 
reauesting additional copies of specifications and plans for work on the Leviathan, 

2. We would appreciate it if you would reply direct to this communication. 

V. V. Woodward, 
Assistant Manager, Construction and Repair DepartmenL 

Inclosure: Letter of April 12, 1920, Boston Navy Yard. 



April 12. 1920. 
From: Director of Construction and Repair Department. 
To: Commander Woodward, assistant manager. Construction and Repair Department. 

The following was received this morning in a wire from Mr. Hague: 
'* Regarding George Washington and Agamenvnon, made no changes in crews' quar- 
ters for the present. Notify Woodward approve his recommendations regarding post- 
poning opening of Leviathan bids until May 15. " 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1551 

Boston Navy Yard, 
Office of the Commandant, 

April lOy 1920. 
Manager of the Construction and Repair Division, 

United States Shipping Board and Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

45 BroadvHiyy New York City, N, Y. 

Dear Sir: Incloeuree (a) and (h) are forwarded for your information in connection 
with jeconditioning and docking the Leviathan at South Boston, as the question has 
been raised whether or not it is poesible to bring this vessel into Boston Harbor. 

The district engineer informed the commandant that in addition to the soundings 
shown as reference (a) these channels have been swept to a depth of 35 feet and that 
since that time there are no indications that these cnannels have silted up, but the 
actual depth of water now is that as shown in inclosures (a) and (b). 

In April, 1919, the XT. S. S. Agamemnanf drawing 37.4 feet, was brought into Boston 
Harbor and berthed alongside of Commonwealth Pier. 

As the range of high tides of Boston Harbor varies from 8.3 to 11.8 feet the com- 
mandant does not consider that there is any doubt, or that there need be any hesitancy 
in bringing the Leviathan into Boston Harbor and docking her at South Boston, or 
berthing her alongside of the north approach pier. 

S. S. Robinson, 
Rear Admired United States Navy, Comnumdant. 

Incloeuree: 

(a) United States Engineer Office blue print of channels, Boston Harbor. 

(h) Navy yard plan 981A-12 of South Boston Dry Dock and approaches. 



April 9, 1920. 
Hon. JoBBPHUS Daniels, 

Secretary of (he Navy, Washington, D. C. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, reconditioning of. 

Reference: Your letter Op. 25-S-4/l-29ie&-6 of April 2 to chairman. 

My Dear Mr. Secretary: As requested in the above reference, the plans and 
flpedficatioDS for the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan will be forwarded to the 
comwumdant^ Navy Yard, Boston/Mass.^ for the preparation of estimates. 

In connection with l^e above, we desire to make the following comments, i. e. : 

The ouestion was taken up in the past of moving this vessel m>m her present berth 
at Pier No. 4, Hoboken, N. J., to the ports of Philadelphia, Newport News, or Boston 
lor reconditioning and docking. 

After investigating the question of draft and stability when the vessel was light, 
together with the iBct that when the reconditioning work is finished, which includes 
the fitting of a structmul material in connection with the fuel oil installation, the 
diaft will be much greater than at present, the conclusion was finally reached that 
it was only not desirable but also dangerous to get the ship to a draft which would 
allow her to enter one of the above three ]^rts. There is also the further difficulty 
and delay that would be encountered in getting the ship read]^ for sea and under steam . 

In view of the above facts, serious consideration is being given to having the recon- 
ditdomng work performed where the ship is at present lying. We are, therefore^ send- 
ing plans and specifications to the New York Navy Yard because should it be definitely 
detennined to nave the reconditioning performed at Hoboken, we have thought you 
miffht desire to have the New York Navy Yard prepare estimates for doing the work 
at New York under those conditions. 
We would very much appreciate receiving your views in this matter. 
Yours very truly, 

R. L. Hague, 
Director of ConstriLCtion and Repair. 
Oare of Commander Woodward. 

Morandi-Proctor Co.. 

Boston, April 9, 1920. 
UNrTED States Shiphng Board, 

4S Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Attention Mr. Jett. 

_^iAB Sir: We imderstood that the steamshio Leviathan has been ordered to the 
Boston Navy Yards for repairs, which includes changing the present jipllAiro f^wn no i 
^burning ranges to electric ranges. 



1552 SHIPPn^G BOABD OPEBATIOKS. 

If specifications are available covering these changes, we would appreciate a copy 
in oraer that we may submit estimate covering the proposed changes. If thoe 
specifications are not available at this time, we would ask you to send us a copy as 
soon as they are published. . 
Very truly, yours, 

Mokandi-Proctor Co., 
f. h. oolton. 



April 8, lil20. 
Robert L. Hague (care of Van Nuys Hotel), 

Lo$ Angeles, Calif.: 

After consultation with Gibbs on Leviathan specificationB we are of opinion will be 
impossible to get satis&tctory results if bids are opened on May 1. On account of &ze 
and importance of job we suggest opening bids May 15 in order to give all contiactoEB 
and navy yards ample time to prepare estimates. If meets your approval will issue 
specifications on receipt your wire making opening of bids May 15. 

V. V. Woodward, 



April 7, 1920. 

To: United States District Engineer, Customhouse, Boston, Mass. 
Subject: Depth of water available in channels and approaches of Boston Harbor from 
ihe entrance to the South Boston dry dock. 

1. It has been proposed to place the steamship Leviathan in the South Boston drv 
dock, and the Shipping Board, mana^g the vessel, has made inq^uiries as to the depth 
of water available for this purpose. Thev state that the vessel will draw not less tbaa 
37 feet upon arrival; that ner draft will be increased by at least 2 feet after refitting; 
and that it may reach 41 feet. This is presumed to be the maximum draft. 

2. Charts available show several spots having a depth of 30 and 31 feet in the North 
Chanuel. 

3. The commandant requests to be furnished reliable data showing the maximum 
draft which may be carried into the harbor of Boston and to the South Boston dry 
dock at mean low water. 

4. In this connection, if it be available, he further requests to be furnished with a 
curve, or data from which a curve may be plotted, showing the rise and fall during a 
whole spring tide from one low water to the next low water. 

G. N, Hayward. 

By direction. 

To: Commandant Manager Construction and Repair Department, Shipping Boerd, 

New York City, pubkc works officer, senior aide, captain of yard. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 
Office Chief of Construction, 

9 Broadway, New York, April 6, 19t0. 
Commander V. V. Woodward, 

Construction and Repair Department^ 

United States Shipping Board, New. York. 
Dear Sir: Referring to our conversation on the subject of sending the steasmhip 
Leviathan to Boston. 

As you know, we have already considered carefully the possibility of moving this 
ship from her present berth at Pier No. 4, Hoboken, N. J., to shipbuilding yards at 
Philadelphia or Newport News. After investigating the question of the draft and 
stability when light, together with the fact that wnen there conditioning work is 
finished, which includes the fitting of structural material in connection with the oil' 
fuel installation the draft will be much greater, we finally came to the conclusion, 
concurred in by the heads of the yards, that it was not only undesirable but also 
dangerous to get the ship to a draft which would allow her to enter either Philadelphia 
or Newport News. This also, of course, applies to Boston. You are familiar with the 
further difiiculties that would be encountered in getting the ship ready for sea and 
under steam. 

In view of all the facts, we are convinced that the best place to perform the recon^ 
ditioning work is where me ship is presently lying. 

In this connection we suggest that if the Navy Department is to estimate on the 
cost of the reconditioning work, that this estimate be made by the New York yard, 
and should it be finally determined to give this work to them, that you anaoge to 



SHIPPING BOARD OPBRATIOKS. 1563^ 

tnuirfer each other of the Shipping Board vessels as may be at that yard to Boston or 
elsewhere, in order that the existing; facilities at the havy yard here may be used in 
foil force on the Leviathan work. We presume that this arrangement would be equally 
satisfactory to the Navy Department, and certainly so far as the reconditioning of the 
Leviathan is concerned, is most important. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 
Agents for U. S, Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

By William Francis Gibbs, Chief of Construction, 



Boston Navy Yard, 
Oppice op the Commandant, 

April 6y 1920, 

Telephone conversation; synopsis; 2.45 p. m. 

Calling;: Boston Navy Yard, commandant's aid. Commander Hayward. 

Replying: New York, Assistant Manager, C. <fe R. Dept. USSB, Commander V. V.. 
Woodward. 

Boston : We are calling on the subject of the Leviathan. We now have the necessary 
tathority to <mier a planning and estimatins party to New York to look at the Leviathan, 
We do not want to send them down untu we receive the plans and specifications. 
When will that be? 

New York: They have not been issued yet. As soon as we get them we will send 
them. 

Boston: Do you think it will be of any advantage to send the party before that? 

New York: I do not. 

Boston: How many copies of the plans will you send us? 

New York: Only one. There are 700 pages in the plan. We will mimeograph 
them and then they will be printed in book form. How many would you want? 

Boston: The two divisions wanted 12 altogether, but we could get along with 4. 
It will help us considerably. 

New York : We can probably meet that. We are rather doubtful as to the Leviathan 
leaving Boston alter her weights shall be aboard. 

Boston: You can get anything out of this harbor at hieh water that draws less than 
45 feet. At mean low water about 35 feet. As we underBtand it there is 35 feet at 
mean low water in approaches to Boston Harbor. To make sure we will get the Army 
engineeT to give the data. There is 10-feet rise and fall. We will notify you. There 
is not the slightest doubt but that we can handle her. 

New York: Her draft will certainly be increased by 2 feet and may reach a maxi- 
mum of 41 feet. 

Boston: Very well. 

G. N. Haywarti. 
Commander, United States Navy. 

Copy to commandant, construction ofUcer, engineer officer, captain of yard, senior aid ^ 



Intbrnationai. Mercantilb Marine Co., 

Oppice op the Chibp op Construction, 

New York, April 3, 19t0. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Division of Construction and Repair, United States Shipping Boards 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

Subject: Consulting architects steamship Leviathan. 

Dear Mr. Hague: Referring to our letter to you dated December 30, inclosing^ 
<^py of letter to Messrs. Walker & Gillette of December 22, and their reply, and also 
your reply dated January 2, which correspondence covers the employment of Messrs. 
Walker & Gillette in connection with work on the Leviathan, with the understand^ 
ing that their out-of-x)ocket expense is to be paid, and that their profit and compen- 
«uon are to be fixed at a later date. 

In view of the satis&tctory work that has been performed thus far by this firm, and 
uie importance of having the decorative features of the design in competent hands ^ 
▼6 recommend that we continue the employment of this firm, and that their compen- 
jatioiL and in view of the exi)erience and prominence of this firm, we recommend 
that their compensation and profit be fixed at a fee of $1,000 per month, to date from 



1554 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

their employment and to continue during their employment in connection with the 
work on the ateamship Leviathan. 

You are well aware of the magnitude of the decorative and fumiahing features in 
connection with the Leviathan, and we feel that the profit and compensation to the 
members of the firm of architects mentioned is entirely proper and reasonable under 
aU the circumstances. 

If you approve, we will conclude this anangement as suggested. 
Very tiHily, yours, 

iNTBaNATIONAL MbRCANTILE MaBINE Co., 

Agentifor Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
By W. F. GiBBS, Chief of Construction. 



Approved, April 3, 1920. 



R. L. Haqub. 



Navy DbpabtmbnTj 

Wiukington^ Ajml 1, J9t0, 

My Dbab Sir: In reply to your letter of March 30, 1920, relative to submitting 
estimates for reconditioning the steamship Leviathan, I beg to inform you that the 
navy yard, Boston, is in a position to undertake this work and it is requested that the 
plans and specifications of the said reconditioning be forwarded to the commandant, 
navy yard, Boston, Mass., for the preparation of estimates. 
Very sincerely, 

JosEPHUB Daniels, Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear Admiral W. S. Benson, United States Navy, retired. 
Chairman United Stata Shipping Board, Waehington, D. C. 



March 30, 1920. 
Hon. JoHEPHUR Daniels, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

My Dear Mr. Secretary: It is contemplated that plans and specifications for 
the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan will be completed and ready for sub- 
mission with tenders for bids within the next few days, and this is to ask if the Na%7 
Department desires to submit an estimate for this work in competition with com- 
mercial bidders, in which event we will be glad to send the plans and specifications 
to the ofiicer you designate at the same time they are forwarded to the commercial 
contractors. 

Very truly, yours, 

W. S. Benson, Chairman. 



March 30, 1920. 

From: Assistant to manager, construction and repair department. 
To: International Mercantile Marine, New York City. 
Attention: Mr. Gibbs. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

We return herewith contract form of the New York Telephone Co. for supplying 
service from your switchboard to the above ship. 

This contract is in accordance with our understanding and may be forwarded to the 
telephone company for settlement. 

Robert W. Bruce, 
Assistant to Manager, Construction and Repair Department. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief op Construction, 

New York, March t6, 19t0, 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager, Department of Construction and Repair, Diinsion of Operations, 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York. 

Dear Sir: Referring to the attached contract which has been presented by the 
"*^ '' Telephone Co. for signature, will you kindly have your department go over 



SHIPPING BOAKD OPERATIONS. 1555 

same, and if in order, approve it and return the contract to me, and I will in turn 
forward it to the telephone people, who are anxious to settle this matter up. 

The lettera I have on it, is a letter from Miss Ida Nelson, chief operator as referred 
to in crmy of letter attached. 
YouiB, very truly, 

Intebnational Mbbcantilb Marine Co., 
AgenUfor Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
By W. F. GiBBR, Chief of ComtnLction. 



Boston Navy Yard, 
Officb of the Commandant, 

March 27, 19X0. 

To: Manager construction and repair department, division of operation, United 

States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, New YorK, N. Y. 
Subject: South Bo^n dry docks, availability for docking the Leviathan. 
Reference: Telephone conversation between your Mr. Duncan and Capt. Elliot Snot 
(CC), United States Navy, construction officer at this yard, at about 10.50 a. m., 
March 26, 1920. 

1. The reference contained inauihes as to the docking and repairing facilities at 
the South Boston dry dock, witn a special reference to docking and repairing the 
Leviathan. 

This dry dock is long enough to take a vessel 1,157 feet over all, 109 feet beam, 
with a draft of 40 feet at mean low water when the caisson is in the outer sill. At 
mean high water the draft would be increased to about 49 feet 6 inches. 

2. At the request of the New York Shipping Board office, through the Boston dia- 
trict ajB^ent, the possibility of docking the Leviathan in this dock, has already been 
rnvestigated by the Vard^ and it is certain that that vessel can be easily and safely 
docked there if her (uuft is at the figure reported in previous inquiries. 

3. Attention is called to the fact that the above depth over the nil is more than 
that in the channels of Boston Harbor, and that the Leviathan , if she draws more than 
35 feet, would have to come in at high tide and be berthed before the tide bad fallen 
to a level 2 feet above mean low water. 

4. Attention is also called to the fact that the berth approach pier to this dry dock 
furnished probably the most comfortable and serviceable berth for that vessel on the 
Atlantic coast of tne United States. It is 900 feet long and carried 37 feet at low water. 

5. There are at present practicallv no facilities at the dock for cairyine on lai^ 
and extensive repairs. The work already accomplished for the Shipping Board has 
been limited to minor structural work, overhauling of sea valves, examination of 
rudder pintles, and of course the usual cleaning and painting of hull and the testing 
of tanks. All other work is done on the ship or at the navy yard shops. 

6. The yard already has prints of the docking plans of the vessel in the Mersey. 

7. The conmiandant requests that he be furnished, as soon as practicable, with 
the reasons for rec^uestinp^ tnis information, in order that he may proceed intelligently 
in case of future inquiries. He understands that your inquiry is based upon some 
request received from Philadelphia. 

S. S. Robinson, 
Rear Admiral , United States Navy, Commandant. 

Copies to commandant, senior aid, assistant manager construction and repair de- 
partment. United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York 



March 25, 1920. 
Chief inspector y construction and repair departmenty repair cost audit bureau: 
(Attn. Mr. Thos. Brogan.) 
Steamship Z»«t7ta^7i— damaged by Martha Washington. 

lii reply to your letter of March 23, please be advised that a survey was held on the 
steamship Leviathan to determine damage caused to her by the steamship Martha 
l^j^ngtony and the cost of this survev together with the cost of the repairs resulting 
nom same, should be charged to the Army. 

Earl P. Mason, 
Chief Inspector y Repair Section. 



1556 SHIPFING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Division of Operations, 
Unitbd States Shipping Board 
Em BROBNCT Fleet Corporation, 

New York, Mart^ tS, 1920. 

From: Auditor of repairs, repair cost audit bureau, rebuilding. 
To: Mr. E. P. Mason, chief inspector, construction and repair department, buildinf^. 
Subject: Damage sustained by collision of die steamship Leviathan with the steamship 
Martiia Washington. 

1. Under date of February 26, requisition No. 5092 was issued by your depattaMnt 
to Mr. Frank S. Martin, covering the survey of damage sustained by collision with 
the steamship Martha Washington,- 

2. It was our understanding that all requisitions covering this particular ship after 
December 17, 1919, were to be ireued by Mr. William G. Gibbs, chief of the con- 
struction di\ision of the International Mercantile Marine Co., and that the costs wero 
to be chargeable to the reconditioning account. 

3. Will you kindly advipe me if we are to anticipate any further requisitions from 
your department and in the particular case referred to, whether or not the costs of 
the survey referred to, are properly chargeable to the reconditioning account. 

Per Thomas J. Migoins, Auditor, 

T. A. Brooan, Auditor of Repairs. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

Netv York, March t4y 19gO, 
Mr. Robert W. Bruce, 

Assistant to manager, Construction and Repair Department , 

United States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Subject: Damage to Steamship Leviathan, 

Dear Sir: Your letter of March 22 has been received, and we beg to inclose, here- 
with, cop. • of joint report dated February 24, and signed by the representatives of 
the Shipping Board, Army, and this office. 

Under date of February 26 we wrote to Mr. Dunning, executive assistant to the 
manager of the Construction and Repair Department, that we estimated the cost of 
the repairs to be $2,500. 

We have received a letter dated March 2 from W. Davis Conrad, assistant admiialtr 
counsel of the Shipping Board, reporting to us that he has received the report of the 
above occurrence, and on March 9, the master of the Leviathan reported to Sir. Conrad 
in person on the above occurrence. 
I trust that this gives you the information you require. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agentsfor Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
By W. F. Gibbs, Cfkiefof Construction. 



March 22, 1920. 

From: Assistant to manager construction and repair department. 
To: International Mercantile Marine, New York City. 
Attention: Mr. W. F. (iibbs. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

We are in receipt of request from the Admiralty Division, asking us to furnish them 
with statement of the damage sustained by the above vessel in collision with the 
S. S. Martha Washington during the last of January. 

Kindly furnish this section with report on same and oblige. 

Robert W. Bruce, 
Assistant to Manager, Construction and Repair Department. 

Unttrd State.s Shipping Board, 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
Inter office memorandum. March 11, 19t0. 

From: G. R. Snider, Admiralty Division. 

To: Construction and repair department. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, Martha Washington, collision. 

Please furnish this division with a statement of the damage sustained by the 8. S. 
Leviathan on January 24, 1920, by reason of collision with the S. S. Martha Washington. 

G. R. Snider, 

AdmiraUy Division. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1557 

Intbrkatiomai. Mbrcantilb Marine Co., 

Officb of trb Chief of Construction. 

New York, March 17, 1920. 
Mr. R. L. Haoub, 

Director Construction and Repair Department, 

Divieion of Operations^ United atates Shij^ping Board 

Emergency Fleet Corporatum, New York City, 

Attention Commander V. V. Woodward. 

Snbject: S. S. Leinaihan, machine shop equipment. 

Dear Sir: Referring to our letter of March 6, the quotation which we had 
obtained on a 14-foot lathe was subject to prior sale, and before we could close thia 
lathe had been sold, and another one of thiB t>rpe and size can not be delivered before 
July 1. We have, however, received a quotation covering an 18-inch lathe in place of 
the 14-inch lathe, at a total cost of |2,792, which is $710 more than the 14-incn lathe. 
Shipment of this equipment from the factory ca n be had within one month. In view 
of the prompt delivery which can be obtained, and the necessity of having this machine 
on board the vessel at &e earliest possible date, we recommend that we accept the 
proposition. 

We also suggest that we substitute triumph motors, which are manufactured in 
Cincinnati, in place of the electro dynamic motors originally quoted on for the radial 
drill and the ^-inch lathe. This will mean an increase of cost of |63, but a saving in 
time of delivery of 80 machine days. 

If you approve this alteration, kindly sign the approval on the duplicate inclosed 
herewith, and return. 

Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
By W. F. GiBBS, Chief of Construction. 

Approved: March — , 1920. 

R. L. Haoub. 

March 29, 1920. 

To: Manager, Construction and Repair Department^ Division of Operations, United 
States Sliipping Board Emeigency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

Subject: Reportmg error in the reference in which the docking of the Leviaihan in the 
South Boston dry dock was discussed. 

Reference: Commandant's letter 317-L of March 27, 1920. 
1. Paragraph 6 of the reference as sent was not correct. It should read thus: 
"The yard has prints of the docldng plan of the vessel, including the midship 

flection, and a full report of her docking in the Mersey." 

G. N. Hatward. 

(By direction.) 

Copy to commandant, senior aid, aaaistant manager Construction and Repair Depart- 
ment, United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City; 
Operation and Navigation, Construction and Repair. 



Navy Yard, 
Boston, Mass., March 16, 1920. 
^m: Master. 
To: Commander V. V. Woodward, aasbtant manager Construction and Repair Depart- 

ment. United States Shipping Board, New York. 
Subject: Steamship Leviatnan, paintings. 
Reference: (a) Your letter March 15, 1920. 

1. On investigation I am unable to learn that any paintings from the steamship 
^^viotAon were ever delivered to this ship by order of the Shipping Board. 

Wm. J. Ryan, Master. 
(Attention R. Jacobs, jr.) 



March 16, 1920. 
(MemoEandnm for inventory section.) 
Subject: Steamship Levtathtm, 

It has come to the attention of this department that at the present time there are 
flBveial boxes of silverware, fonneily on the steamship LevicOhan, now stored in the 
wihattan Storage & Warehouse Co., but the storage company has no list of the arti- 
<^tt ocmtttined in the various boxes. 



1558 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

It is therefore requested that your department, if poenbie, f umiflh this office vith 
a complete list of siivenrare formerly belonging to the Leviathan racfw in the custody 
of the Manhattan Storage & Warehouse Co. 

V. V. Woodward. 
By Construction A Alteration Sectiok, 

CoTUtnuiion and Repair Department, 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office Chief of Construction, 

Neic York, March 10, 19t0. 
Manager Division of Construction and Repair, 

United States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation^ New York. 

Dear Sir: We are advised by the Manhattan' Storage &, Warehouse Co. that the 
paintings removed from the steamship Leviathan were delivered bv them on an ord^ 
from the United States Shipping BcuBUti and that they believe these painting were 
sent to the steamship George Washington. 

Will you Idndly advise us if the paintings in question were disposed of in this 
manner? 

We are further advised by the Manhattan Storage & Warehouse Co. that certain 
silver belonging to the steamship Leviathan is packed in boxes which are in their 
custody, but that they have not any knowledge or lists of the articles and they suggest 
that we obtain this information from vou. 

We will, therefore, appreciate you furmshing us with a list of the articlee of silver- 
ware formerly on the steamship Leviathan and now stored with the Manhattan Storage 
& Warehouse Co. 

Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 
Agents for the Emergenoi Fleet Corporation. 
By William Cranes Gibbs, Chief of Construction. 



UNrrED States Shipfing Board, 
Law Division, New York Office, Customhouse, 

New York, March 9, 19t0. 

(Memorandum for assistant manager, Construction and Repair.) 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, steamship Martha Washington. 

Referring to your letter of February 28, 1920, inclosing survey of the Leviathan 
on account of above collision, I beg to advise that I have taken statement from the 
master of the Leviathan and it would appear that these repairs should be made for the 
account of the Army, whom I understand was operating the Martha Waskington 
at the time. I have so notified the Army Transport Service, and request that you 
notify other proper departments of the Shipping Board so that when the repairs are 
made the bill may be forwarded to the Army for payment. 

W. Davis Conrad, 
Assistant Admiralty Counsel. 

March 9, 1920. 

From: R. L. Hague, director Division of Construction and Repairs. 

To: Judge John Barton Payne, chairman United States Shipping Board, Wash- 

inp^n, D. C. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan contract. 

1. When the subject of reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan was under con- 
sideration it was evident that the Shipping Board did not possess an organization 
suitable to handle an imdertaking of ^tnis magnitude, which is probably uie lajgest 
reconditioning job ever imdertaken in the world and a problem without precedent 
in American snipping. 

2. On account of its size and great draft — 41 feet loaded — ^the only logical route 
for the employment of the Leviathan (at least pending the United States being at 
peace with Germany) was to run frem New York to Southampton via Cherbourg. 

3. There was onlv one line operating American passenger vessels in this service, 
namely, the I. M. M., an American company incorporated in New Jersey. This com- 
pany had the advantage of many years' operating experience in this service, and in 
addition was the only American organization whi(£ had handled veesels even approxi- 
mating the size of the Leviathan. Furthermore, this company had &cilities, or could 
secure facilities, to handle l^e vessel at dther end of the route and possessed the 
'-^— ^ complete and efficient American organization available for the operation of this 



SHIFPINQ BOARD OPERATIONS. 1559 

ahip. it was therefore concluded that this was the logical American company to 
which especially the steamship Leviathan, being the largest ship in the world, should 
be assigned lor management and operation. 

4. To compensate the International Mercantile Marine for the enlargement of its 
organization sufficiently to enable it to handle the Leviathan^ it was mutually agreed 
that they could depend upon having this vessel assigned to it for operation and man- 
agement for a period of five years on terms to be agreed upon, contingent, of course, 
upon a xxjssible sale. 

5. Consequently, inasmuch as it had been determined that this vessel would be 
assigned to the I. M. M. for management and operation, it was only fitting that ad- 
vantage should be taken of that experience ana or^nization in the reconditioning. 
The Snipping Board had no organization, nor could it obtain a temporary' one except 
at much greater expense than the monthly compensation of $15,000 agreed upon 
with the I. M. M. for this work. The agreement as drafted enables the board to 
obtain the benefit of the results derived by the employment of some of the best brains 
engaged in the American passenger service and relieves the board of an enormous 
mass of details for which a special organization, more or less efficient, iust necessairly 
have been created. And at Uie same time, this agreement provides for an adequate 
check and control of expenditures of Government funds in this work, and the final 
dedflion in M. matters oi expense and policy rests with the Shipping Board. Under 
the terms of the contract the International Mercantile Marine is responsible for the 
l^eparation of prdiminary plans and specifications so that a fixed price may be 
obtained from tne repair yards for the accomplishment of this work. As time will 
be of the essence in the tender sent out to the various repair yards as an important 
&ctor in the consideration of their bids, this work in turn will fix the time which the 
vessel will be laid up for reconditioning, and therefore limits the amount of com- 
pensation which the International Mercantile Marine will receive for supervision 
under the agreement, which it is estimated will not exceed 18 months. 

6. If the International Mercantile Marine was to employ its best talent and give 
the benefit of its years of experience in the reconditioning of the Leviathan, it was 
only considered just that in the event of the sale of this vessel that that company 
should be given an opportunity to meet the highest bid that might be made for this 
ship, not for that reason alone, but also because the International Mercantile Marine 
is tne onl^ American concern that is in a x>oeition to handle a ship of this size. 

7. This is strictly a business contract based upon strict business principles in the 
interest of efficiency and economy. 

R. L. Hague, 
Director Division of Construction and Repair, 



March 8, 1920. 
(Memorandum for Mr. Moore, Superintendent of Guards.) 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

For your information and guidance we are attaching hereto memorandum from 
Acting General Counsel Dean, with reference to the legidity of the International Mer- 
cantile Marine employing guards from a private company to protect the steamship 
LemJQwn^ in which it is held that the International Mercantile Marine is quite within 
its rights in employing these guards. 

Mr. Hague's memorandum of March 3, covering this matter, is also inclosed herewith, 

V. V. Woodward, 
Assistant Manager Construction and Repair Department, 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Opficb of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, March 6, 1920. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Director Construction and Repair Department, 

Division of Operation, United States Shipping Board, 

Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

S^ject: Steamship Leviathan, machine-shop equipment. 

Dear Sir: The present machine-shop eouipment of the Leviathan in respect to 
'''^8<^ne tools is in very bad condition. The tools have been badly used, and the 
^^^t is that the shop is not able to handle the work which we can properly expect 
w this department, and part of the equipment is in such shape that we do not feel 
that ve are justified in expending further amoimts on its repair, particularly since 
U is not of a size and type requisite to our needs. 



1560 SHIPPINQ BOARD OPBRATIONS. 

It is OUT intention to let the shop's force do as much vork as posnble on the recon- 
ditioning of the machinery plant, and iJso when the ship goes into op^ation to do 
as much as possible in operating repairs. Under these circimstances it is essentuJ 
that the machine-tool equipment of this ship be placed in firat-claas condition, and 
that it be equipped with tools of size and type particularly suited to the space avail- 
able and the work to be done. 

To meet these conditions we recommend the purchase of one 3-foot radial drill, 
one 14 by 6 inch engine lathe^ one 33-inch by 14-foot H. D. engine lathe. All of 
the above equipment will be individual motor drive, because, considering the low- 
headroom in the shop and the danger involved, we will not recommend a perpetuation 
-of the present belt drive. 

We have received a proposal from the Biles-Bement Pond Go. covering this appara- 
tus, all at a price of $10,888, which we recommend promptly be accepted. 

We inclose, herewith, duplicate of this letter for your approval signature. If yoa 
accord in this recommendation, kindly sign this duplicate and return to us promptiy 
•so tiiat we can place the matter in hand. 
Very truTy. yours, 

International Mbrcantilb Mabinb Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Carporatian. 

By W. F. GiBBs, Chief of Conetruetion. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

OmcB OF THE Chief of Construction, 

New York, March 6, 1920, 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Director Construction and Repair Departmentj 

Division of Operations, United States Shipping Boards 

Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, reduction in officers and crew. 

Dear Sir: We acknowledge receipt of letter of March 5 from Commander Wood- 
ward, and we refer to our letter of March — . 

The present officers staff for this steamer consists of captain, chief officer and three 
third officers. We consider that this is the minimum number required on this 
steamer under present conditions and consistent with the degree of supervision 
which we believe should be maintained. The third officers have under their 
jurisdiction tne ship's force and the guards. 

We believe that considering the risk, particularly that of fire, that the number of 
guards is as small as it should be, compatible with safety. We would draw your 
attention to the fact that since taking over this vessel, three fires have been discovered 
and promptly extinguished. I do not need to call your attention to the mve fire risk 
x>n this vessel, and we therefore can not approve a reduction in the number of guarda. 
Very truly yours, 

International Mbrcantilb Marinb Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Cofrpormon, 
By W. F. Gibes, Chief of Constructum. 

STEAMSHIP "leviathan" — REDUCTION IN OFFICERS AND CREW. 

March 6, 1920. 
From: Assistant manager, Construction and Repair Department. 
To: Mr. Wm. Francis Gibbs, Chief of Construction, International Mercantile Marine 

Co., New York. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan — Reduction in officers and crew. 
Reference: Your letter March 6, 1920; our letter March 5, 1920. 

1. The reduction of officers as mentioned in your letter of March 6, 1920, is satisfac- 
tory to us and it is hereby approved. 

2. The question of the number of guards emplojred is satisfactoiy to this office and 
you are authorized to maintain the guard force in its present number. 

Yours, very truly, 

V. V. Woodward, 
Assistant Manager Construction and Repair Department. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1561 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office op the Chief of Construction, 

New York, March 5, 1920. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Director Construction and Repair Department^ Division of Operations^ 

United States Skipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation^ New York City. 
Subject: Coal for the steamship Leviathan. 

Dear Sir: We would appreciate receiving from you approval for us to order coal as 
m&y be necoasary to maintain the steamship Leviathan. 

T hi« approvalshould cover purchases of coal made to date and in the future. You 
will (|nitc understand that under present conditions in the coal situation in Ne^' 
York, it is essential for us to be in a position to purchase coal as it offers, and the amount 
and prce may vary from time to time, but you may rest assured we will do all in 
our power to obtain the lowest rates 

With the win+er weather a faihire of the coal supply to the above steamer would 
be disastrous, and we are doing all in our power to prevent the eventuality. 

We are inclosing duplicate of this letter for your approval signature. Kindly 
return this ♦© us. 

Verj' truly, yours. 

International Mercantile Marine Co.. 

Agents for EmergeTicy Fleet Corporation ^ 
By Willia m Francis Gibbs. Chief of Construction. 



March 5, 1920. 

From: Cominander V. V. Woodward, assistant manager construction and repair de 

partment. New York. 
To: Mr. Wm. Francis Gibbs, chief of construction. International Mercantile Marine 

Co., New York. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan, crew. 
Reference: Your letter of March 3, 1920. 

\ . We acknowledge receipt of the above reference and have noted contents of same. 
2. We do not quite agree with you on the officers' personnel reauired by the steam- 
ship LerirOian. In the first place, we do not approve of the third officer being in 
charge of each guard watch. Kindly place a chief guard in this position. 

^. Please reduce the complement of officers lo the following: One captain, one 
first officer, one second officer, and one th^rd officer. 
*1. We are also of the opinion that the guard personnel is entirely too large. 
5. We would thank you to offer your suggestions as to what way .you would like to 
reduce this force. 
B. Kindly acknowledge receipt of this letter and oblige. 
Yours, very truly, 

V. V. Woodward, 
Assistant Manager Construction and Repair Department. 



Division of Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Washintfton, March S, 1920. 

From: R. L. Hague, direc'or of construction and repair. 
To: y. V. Woodward, assistant manager. 
Subject: Steamship Lemoihon. 

Inclosed is memorandum from Acting General Counsel Dean, giving iiis opinion 
with respect to the point raised by Mr. Moore, superintendent of guards of New York, 
concermng the legality of the International Mercantile Marine employing guards 
from a private company to protect the steamship Leviathan. 

In view of a statute whicn prohibits the employment of private detective agencies 
by the Government, you will observe that Mr. Dean states that the International 
Mercantile Marine is quite within its rights and in fact is living up to the letter of the 
contract in employing these guards, but it is understood of course tnat that company 
should bill the Shipping Board for this service rather than that they should send the 
DiDfl which they may pay to the Shipping Board for pa>Tnent. 

Please arrange to sidvise Mr. Moore in response to his memorandum to me and also 
Mr. Sterling with respect to what final arrangements you make with the International 
Mercantile Marine concerning the number of guards'and inform him of the niling of 
the legal department that the procedure in e fleet is entirely legal. 

R. L. Hague, 
Director' of Constniction and Repair. 

177068— 20— pt 4 ^21 



1562 SHIPPING BOARD OFERATIOKS. 

International Mebcantils Marine Co., 

Ofhce of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, Jfarcfc S, t9t0. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Director of Division of Operations, 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

Attention: Commander Woodward. 

Subject: Reduction in officers and crew steamship Ijeviathan. 

Dear Sir: In connection with. our assuming control of the Leviathan it was found 
desirable to recognize the ship's staff and the crew, to enable a more complete sur- 
veillance to be maintained of the various activities essential to the welftlre and aafety 
of the vessel. 

To make this possible required the attention of a considerable number of trained 
officers, and, as previousl>r advised you, we engaged sufficient trained personnel to 
insure that the reorganization would be efficient and thorough. 

This result has been so far accomplished that in addition to a previous reduction of 
seamen, which has been made, we contemplate a further reduction of the officers and 
men, and we will dispense with the services, therefore, of two second officers, three 
third officers, boatswain's noate, and 9 able-bodied seamen. We believe that this 
reduction in i^ersonnel is justified considering the efficient organization of the guards 
and of the ship's personnel now existing. This change will go into effect with tiie 
conclusion of the current week. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents of Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
By William Francts Gibbs, Chief of Constntction. 



International Mercantile Ma rine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, March 2, 1920, 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Director DiHsirm of Construction and Repair, 

United Slates Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 

Subject: Recording of labor, etc. steamship Leviathan. 

Referring to our conversation of Saturday last, we inclose herewith copy of letter 

addressed to Mr. Thomas J. Miggins, assistant comptroller, covering the suggestions 

which we outlined to you to facilitate and simplify the recording of materials and labor 

in connection with the reconditioning of the above steamer. 

We believe that the solution agreed upon with Mr. Miggins will be most satisfactory. 

Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

By William Francis Gibbs, Chief of Construction. 



united states shipping board and emergency fleet corporation interoffice 

memorandum. 

March 2, 1920. 
From: R. A. Dean. 
To: R. L. Hague. 

In reply to your memorandum under date of February 19, 1920, with reference to 
the employment of detective agents in connection with the arrangement of the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine, I desire to state that the International Marine, by the 
terms of their agency contract, should very properljr secure watchmen to take care of 
the steamship Leviaihan, and their failure to do so might fairly be a want of reasonable 
care on their part. 

To employ a detective agency for the purpose of doing the work of an investigating 
nature which is generally performed by such agency, in view of 26 Statutes at Large, 
78, chapter 173, paragraph 8, enacted by Congress April 30, 1890, would not be a 
proper charge or one which the Shipping Board could pay. 

R. A. Dean, Acting General Counsel, 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1563 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Opmcb of Chief of Construcjtion, 

New York, Fehrumy 26, 1920. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Director of Construction and Repair Department ^ 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation , New York City, 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan sample stateroom, "E" deck. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of February 25, instructing us to proceed with the fitting up 
of the sample stateroom has been received, and we are being guided accordingly and 
are going forward with the -fitting up of the stateroom on '*E " deck. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation , 

By William Francis Gibbs, Chief of Construction^ 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, February i6, 1920, 
Mr. R. L. Hague. 

Director of Construction and Repair Department, 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City: 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, test of boiler and oil burners. 

Your letter of February 25, instructing us to proceed with the test of boilers and oil 
burners, has been received, and we are being guided accordingly. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency FleeX Corporation. 
By Willla-m Francis Gibbs, Chief of Construction. 



REPORT OF survey. 



Officr op Frank S. Martin, 

New York, February 25, 1920. 

This is to certify that I, the undersigned, did at the request of the United States 
Shipping Board, New York, survey the steamship Leviathan on February 24, 1920, 
while she was lying at Pier 4, Hoboken, N. J., for the purpose of ascertaining the 
^Daa^ she is said to have sustained by being in collision with the steamship Martha 
Wwihxngton on January 24, 1920, while lying at Pier 4, Hoboken. 

Upon examination found — 

The damage on the port side aft. 

The center bulwark plate badly bent. 

One bulwark plate on the port side of the center plate in way of the fair leads, 
wdly bent. 

Three bulwark stanchions bent. 

The an^le on top of bulwark bent and badly buckled. 

Teak rail on top of bulwark broken. 

Stiffening angle in way of mooring port and mooring-port doors bent and buckled. 

About 16 feet of pipe rail and stanchions on top of bulwark bent. 

One awning stanchion slightly bent. 

««commended: The center bulwark plate on the port side aft to be cut for about 
12 feet, removed, faired, and replaced and the newly formed butt to be secured with 
a strap. 

Oiie bulwark plate on the port side of the center xplate to be removed, faired, and 
replaced. 

Two bulwark stanchions to be renewed and one to be repaired. 

The angle on top of bulwark, where bent, to be removea, faired, and replaced. 

About 30 feet of teak rail on top of bulwark to be renewed. 

The bent stiEfening angle around the mooring port and mooring-port doors to be 
»«^ved, faired, and refitted in place. 

About 16 feet of pipe rail and stanchions to be removed, faired, and replaced. 



1564 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS^ 

C)ne awning stanchion to he removed, faired, and replaced. 
All parta removed in order to effect repairs to 1 e replaced and made good and com- 
plete as hefore. 
All ne.v and repaired work to he painted as 1 efore. 

Frank Martix. 
Sh p and Engineer Surveyor. 

"^iirNoyMre present- Alexander Hf.yt, FranV- S. Martin's office; E. S. Sickles. United 
Mates Army; Ijhn McKinney, International Mercantile Marine. 



February 20, 1920. 
Mr. WrLUAM Fravcia Gibbs, 

Chief of ' fmxtrucHon International MercantiU Marim Co., New York. 

Dear Sir: In view of the fact that the reconditioning of the steamship Leiialhm 
is under the directi'm of the construction and repair department, which is now beine 
absorbed with the construction division into the new division of construction and 
repair, this will serve as vour authority to issue passes for visitors to this vessel upon 
request of the director of construction and repair when personally signed by him or 
by W. F. Dunning for him. 
Yours, very truly, 

Direeior Construction and Repair. 



International Mercantile Marine Co.. 

Office of Chief of Construction, 

New Ybrk, Febnutry 19, 1920. 
Mr. V. V. Woodward, 

AasiHant Mnn^iger Construction and Repair Department^ 

United State}* Shipping Board Emergeru^ Fleet Corporation, New Ybrk City. 
Subject: iSteamship Leriathaii. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of February 16 has been received requesting information on 
the number of watchmen now working on the Leviathan. 

On the day watch. 8 a. m. to 4 p. m., there are 15 guards, and «>n the night watches, 
from 4 p. m. to 12 midnight and from 12 midnight to 8 a. m. there are 21 guards on 
duty. The total number of guards is, therefore, 57, and we require that these men shall 
be in uniform. We pa^ for these men in uniform $5.30 per day, and there is no meal 
or room allowance pro\'ided. 

In additi'^n to these guards there are employed three third officers, who are in cluuige 
of the guard . These men receive the regular Shipping Board rate of $1 88 . 75 per month 
and $4.50 per dav meal and room allowance. 
Trusting the aoove gives you the information requested, we are, 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents Emergency Fleet Corporation^ 
By Wiluam Francis Gibbs, Chief of Constmetion. 



February 16, 1920. 
Memorandum for Mr. R. L. Hague, construction and repair department. 

On May 29, 1917, a contract was entered into by the United States Shipping Board, 
Division of Operations, Capt. Charles Yates, mana^ng agent and myself for me to 
furnish 300 or more guards to protect the various smps in this port. 

On June 1, 1917, I put 400 guards to work in the different shipyards and docks in 
this vicinity. Later on I took over Norfolk, Newport News, and Philadelphia. 

On June 21, 1917, 1 was informed by Capt. Yates, that he had made a contract which 
was illegal with me and quoted Commissioner Donald's letter of June 14, 1917, in 
which Commissioner Donald stated that making a contract with a detective agency was 
illegal. Also Mr. Soleau, chief clerk and disbursing oflBcer had stated to liim that the 
contract was illegal. I have two photographic copies of these two letters. In Mr. 
Soleau's letter he quotes the law as follows: 

*'An act of Congress approved August 5, 1892, provides that thereafter no employee 
of the Pinkerton Detective Agency or similar agency be employed in any Government 
service or by any officer in the District of Columbia." 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1565 

Since that time I have been informed many times that when the Division of Opera- 
tions turned over ships to managers and operators, the latter hired watchmen to guard 
ships, the cost of which was charged to the Government. 

Cast veek I was requested by a young man in the Accounting Department to furnish 
him -.dth information as to when f took the Shipping Board guards irom the steamship 
Let-iathan, After giving him the desired information I asked him why this inquiry 
was mac^e, and he s a*^ because Mallon's Detective Agency is furnishing guards to 
this ship now at $5 per day, 45 men a day, $225 a day, and he showed me their bills for 
the said guarding. 

Now what I have in mind is this: If the law as quoted above by Mr. Soleau in his 
letter of June 21, 1917, was applicable to me during the great stress of war times and 
which I believed was an emergency contract, why is it not applicable now to all these 
detective apencies in peace times? 

W. H. Moore, 
Superintendent of Guards. 



Division of Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, February 16, 1920. 
From: Manager, Construction and Repair Department, United States Shipping Board. 

New York. 
To: International Mercantile Marine Co., New York. 
Attention of Mr. W. F. Gibbs. 
Subject: Leviathan. 

For our information, we are requesting that you furnish this office a memorandum 

Svipg the number of watchmen and roundsmen now working on the steamship 
•liathan, also their rates of compensation and whether or not we are furnishing them 
with mealp. 

Yours, verj' truly, 

V. V. Woodward, 
Asiittant Manager , Construction and Repair Department. 



February 13, 1920. 

Memorandum for Mr. George N. Sterling, assistant director. 
Subject: Steamship Tjeviathan. 

On October 29, 1919, the steamship Leviathan was turned over to me for safe- 
guarding. She vffA tied up to Army rier 4, Hob<^en. These piers, as you prob- 
ably know, have been guarded by the Army transport guards since the war. It in 
impossible to get in any of the gates or on the docks without a pass, which msdces these 
piers rather isolated. 

Capt. Rvan was in charge of this ship with a crew aboard, and after looking over the 
situation f placed eight guards on board various parts of the phip, which in my judg- 
ment were all that was necessary under the circumstances. We withdrew our guards 
on December 30, 1919, and the ship was turned over to the International Mercantile 
Marine (^o., and since that time it has been furnishing guards at the Government's 
expenpo. To-day my attention was called to the fact by ono of my roundsmen that 
there are now 20 guards aboard this ship on each watch, making a total of 60 men per 
day. 

This hhip, as 1 understand it, is in the same condition a«» when our guards were 
aboard it— that is, phe is tied to the do<'k without any repairs being made. If repairs 
were being made, I could readily see why they would need 60 or more men to guard 
her. 

We had 8 guards on each watch, making 24 guards per dav; 21 guards, at $3.75 per 
day, 178.75; 3 chief guards, at $4.25 per day, $12.75: total, '$91. 50 per day; 30 days, 
$2,745. The money difference between the cost under my supervision and at the 
present status is $4,455 per month. I understand these guards are being paid by the 
paymaster in this building weekly, at the rate of $4 per day, which is $240 per day, 
or $7,200 a month, against the charges of my department of $2,745, making the diifcr- 
ence of $4,455 per month. 

*^wp/. of Guards. 



1566 SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATIONS. 

We received authority in telegram dated December 24, No. 38424, mgned by Mr. 
Heerbrandt, to put on any necessary men to inventory the Leviathan, at not exceed- 
ing $5 per day wage. We have found it impossible to secure men to do this work for 
$5 per day. It has now come to the point wnere the International Mercantile Marine 
is pressing us to put on more men, which we are unable to do. 

The only solution, it would seem, is that we be given authority to put on men for 
checking tihis steamer at $7 per day to meet the figure of the International Mercantile 
Marine, out if this is done you can understand that we will probably not have any 
men left in our employ to take inventories on other ships. 

I would advise tnat the Army is paying their inventory clerks $6 per day and $1.25 
for overtime. The Navy men receive $5.35 per day, plus $2 subsistence, whereas our 
men receive $125 per month. 

As you can readily see, the Shipping Board inventory clerks are the poorest paid 
on the water front. 

I would further state that the men that we now have are as good inventor^' clerks 
as there are in New York, and all, or mostly all, have had extensive exi)enence in 
inventorying steamers coming from the Army and Navy and being redelivered to 
owners. 

Therefore, the only real solution of the matter, as far as we can see, is to raise the 
salaries of the permanent inventory staff and give us authority to put on, temporarily, 
the necessary men at $7 per day to cover the Leviathan. 

I understand that Mr. Jett of the Construction and Repair Department is very 
anxious to have the inventory of this steamer completed, so that they can store all the 
material now on board while the steamer is being reconditioned. 

We would thank you to advise, at the earliest possible moment, what action you 
winh us to take, as you are no doubt aware it is urgent. 

Division op Operations, 
(Signed) Lewis G . Foster, 

Manager^ Vessels Delivery Departmeni. 
Copy, Mr. Geoige Herrbrandt. 

February 13, 1920. 

From: Assistant manager construction and repair department, division of construc- 
tion and repair. New York. 

To: International Mercantile Marine Co., 9 Broadway, New York. 

Subject: Proposed fuel-oil barge. 

Reference: Your letter of February 4, 1920. 
(Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs.) 

1. Receipt is acknowledged to the above reference. 

2. In view of the unsettled status of all the ex-German vessels, no action will be 
taken on the above reference until the result of the sale of these vessels are made 
known some time next week. 

(Signed) V. V. Woodward, 

Assistant Manager Construction and Repair Department. 

February 11, 1920. 

(Memorandum for director construction and repair department;. attention Mr. 
R. L. Hague.) 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan, 

As information to you, I am advised that the I. M. M. have 60 watchmen and 3 
roundsmen working on this vessel in three shifts. They also are giving the men one 
meal per day. 

(Signed) G. W. Sterling, 

Assistant Director of Operaiioms. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office Chief of Construction, 

New York, February 11, 1920, 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Department of Construction and Repair, 

United States Shipping Board, New York. 
Dear Sir: Your telegram of February 9 has been received, referring to holding up 
imnecessary work and expense on the Leviathan, and we are being guided accordingly. 
Very truly, yours, 

(Signed) International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By , 

Chief of Construction. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1567 

International Mercantilb Marine Co., 

Office Chisp op Construction, 
New ForJb, February 11, 1920. 
(Attention Conunander Woodward.) 

Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Department of Construction and Repair, ' 

United States Shipping Board, New York. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of February 9, referring to paragrajph 86 of the minutee of 
the committee on specificationB of the oil fuel for the Leinaman, has been received. 
It was our understanding that the four-hour period decided on for the test was to 
commence in each case after a proper time allowance had been made for warming up 
and adjustment of the burner for the burning of the quantity of oil required. The 
time of 16 hours for the actual test of each burner was to cover the period of time during 
which official data would be taken, and did not include the time required for warming 
up and adjustment. 

It would be well, however, to make this point clear, and I will bring your letter 
before the committee at the next meeting. 
Thanking you for your suggestion, we are, 
Very truly, yours, 

(Signed) International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By , Chief of Construction, 



February 10, 1920. 
Mr. P. J. Good, 

Custodian, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dear Sir: We are forwarding herewith for your information copy of explanatory 
letter received from Mr. W. F. Gibbs in reference to the 18-ton anchor presumably 
belonging to tiie steamship Leviathan now at United States Army Pier 4, Hoboken, 
N. J. 

It is requested that you take this matter in hand at your earliest convenience, advis- 
ing this office as to action taken. 
Very truly, yours, 

(Signed) R. L. Hague, 

By :- , 

Passenger Ship Section, Construction and Repair Department. 



Philadelphia, Febvuary 9, 19t0. 
Gibbs, 

International Mercantile Marine, New York: 

In view of possible sale of Le^nathan hold up all unnecessary work and expense. 
This includes the fitting of tiie storage barge for oil and also experimental boiler for 
the oil-burning test aboard the ship itself. 

Hague. 



February 9, 1920. 
From: Mr. R. L. Hague, manager. 

To: Mr. W. 'F. Gibbs, chairman committee on specifications, steamship Leviathan, 
New York City. 

This will acknowledge receipt of copy of informal joint meeting held January 30, 
1920, with the subcommittee on fuel-oil burner tests. 

Referring to paragraph No. 86 of the minutes, periods of test, which reads: 

'*Each individual test at a particular rate of working will be for a period of four hours. 
The rates of working will be four, as follows: 0:2 pounds of fuel oil per square foot of 
heating surface; 0.3 pounds of fuel oil per square foot of heating surface; 0.4 pounds 
of fuel oil per square foot of heating sTirface; 0.5 pounds of fuel oil per square foot of 
heating sumce. 

**This will allow curves of performance to be drawn and will require 16 hours for 
the actual test of each burner.^' 

In lieu of the above, T believe six-hour periods for each test would be more sati**- 
»ctory and more accurate. This would make 24 hours for each burner test, which 
would allow some margin of time to getting a settled condition at the beginning of 
«»ch period. 



1568 SHIPPING BOARD OFBRATIONS. 

Should you consider favorably the period of eix hours I would suggest that the fint 
hour at the beginning of each period be devoted to getting a settled condition and that 
no official readings be taken, but tliat the oflRcial readings be started at the begiimim; 
of the second hour and continued until the end of tliat particular period. This, I 
believe, would give us more accurate data. 

R. L. Hague, 
Manager Comttruclion and He pair Depariment. 



Februaby 6, 1920. 
International Mercantile Marine, • 

(,'onstniclion Department^ New York City. 
(Attention Mr. William F. Gibbe, steamship Leviathan.) 

Dear Sir: Evidently due to the confusion, incident to moving, my attention wap 
not directed to your communication of January 26 until copy ofsanie wa£< received 
with your letter of February 2. 

It will be entirelv satisfactory to have the work in connection with the test of boiler 
and oil burners on the steamship Levlnikan porfonned by the Tietjen & Lang Co. 
Very truly, yours. 

DiREcrroR of Construction and Repair. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of CoNSTRUfTioK, 

Nf.ir York', Fcbrnanf f, /o><>. 
Mr. J. W. LiNCK, 

Passenger Ship Sectifyrij ('onstnictian and Repair Departmtmt, 

Unitefl SUite$ Skipping Board, New Ycrl Citt/. 
Subject: Damage to steamship Leviathan by collision w^ith Army tug A^o. 6. t/>wing 
United States Navy lighter No. HO. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of January 29 has been receiver! , and we have investigated 
this matter and beg to advipe you that the damage to the Lc^ciatkan from the above 
cause dio occur on November 24, at 10 a. m,, as appears by the copy of report of Capt. 
Ryan, then master, as the accident occurred prior to our taking charge of the LeviatJwv . 
We are not in a position to advise you of any details beyond thoee contained in 
Capt. Ryan's report. 

Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

AqenUfor Emergency Fleet Corporation^ 
By Chief op Construction. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York, February 4, 19S0, 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Division of Operations, Department of ConstnuU^ion and Repair, 

New York City. 
Subject: Proposed fuel-oil barge. 

Dear Sir: In connection with the test of the Leviathan boiler under oil fuel, it is 
necessary to obtain certain fuel storage capacity to cover the requirement of fuel oil 
for the entire test, in order that each of the tests may be run under similar conditions, 
so far as fuel is concerned. 

It has been suggested by Mr. Milne that the cheapest and at the same time the 
most advantageous way to obtain this oil capacity would be for the Shipping Board 
to fit out wooden hull No. 274 — teamship Ishum — ^which is now lying at Wilson 
Point, Conn., and place thereon eight 30-ton oil tanks, together with the neceeBuy 
pumps and heating coils to handle the oil. 

We understand that nearly all of the material tanks, pumps, piping, etc., required 
for this work is at present in storage awaiting disposal at the aoove storage yaid and 
we append a list of such material herewith which will be found advantageous in 
fitting up the proposed oil storage bai^e and the test equipment on the steamer. 

If you approve of this suggestion it will be appreciated if you will issue the necessary 
orders to those in charge of the property as mentioned on the annexed list, to turn 
same over on proper receipt being given to the Todd Shipyards Corporation Mr. 
Milne, with the understandmg that this will be temporarily loaned to us for during 



SHTPPINQ BOARD OPERATIONS. 1569 

the test of the Leviathan boiler. Afterwards thie equipment we think will be found 
very useful to the Shipping Board because there is a great scarcity of oil carrying 
bai)^ in the harbor. 

Very truly, yours. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By Williams Thomas Gibbs, 

Chief of Construction. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Construction Department, 

New York, February f , 19S0. 
Mr. E. A. Stevens, Jr., 

United States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York City. 

Dear Sir: Inclosed herewith is copy of informal joint meeting held with subcom- 
mittee on oil burner tests steamship Leviathan. 
By order of the chairman. 

Secretary pro tem. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, February £, 19X0. 

Division of Operations^ United States Shipping Boards 

Emergency Fleet Corporation j New York City. 

(Attention Mr. J. W. Linck.) 

Gentlemen: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter dated January 30, 1920, 
regarding an IS-ton anchor, presumably belonging to the steamship Leviathan, now 
at the fleet supply base, South Brooklyn, New York 

This matter will be investigated at once and I will be pleased to advise you further 
in the premises. 

very truly, youn, 

Chief of Construction. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

(Construction Department, 

Neir York, February 2, 1920. 
Mr. R. L. Hague. 

Manoffer Division of Construction and Repair, 

United States Shipping Boijtrd Emergency Fleet Corporation. New York City. 

Dear Sir: Subject: Teat of oil fuel burners and boiler, steamship Levi/ithan. 
I am inclr)sing herewith a copy of my letter to you dated January 26, 1920, on 
above-mentioned puh^ect. 
Will you kindly advise us as promptly as p )8sible of your decision in this matter? 
Very truly, yours, 

Chief of Construction. 



January 31, 1920. 
Memorandum for Mr. 0(iden, steamship Leviathan. 

^'infirmin? telephone conversation, inclosed herewith are forms 0. A. 1, C. A. 3. in 
C()nneoti:)n ynth injury of Daniel J. Ryan, fireman employed on the Leviothan, which 
wc'irred on January 19. 1920, and is sent to you for transmittal to the United States 
Employees' C;)mpensation Commission, at Washington. 

R. L. Hague, 

By , 

Construction and Repair Department. 



January 31, 1920. 
International Mercantile Marine, 

New York City. 

Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs, steamship Leviathan. 

I^EAR Sirs: This will acknowledge your communication of January 28 from the 
niaster of the Leviathan, inclosing forms C. A. 1, C. A. 2. and C. A. 3, in connection 



1570 SHIPPING BOARD OFBRATIOKS. 

with the injury of Daniel J. Ryan, fireman employed on the Leviathan, which occuned 
on January 17, 1920. 

We are arranging to forward these forms through our insurance division to the United 
States Employees' Compensation Commission here. 
Very truly, yours, 

Manager Corutruction and Repair Department. 



January 31, 1920. 
Mr. Thom.ks J. MiGoiNS, 

Assistant Comptroller, New York City (steanuthip Leviathan), 

Dear Sir: In response to your communication of January 20, 1920, file WPG, thi* 
will confirm underntanding that the following procedure will be followed in connec* 
tion with approvals for expenditures under contract with the International Mercantile 
Marine for reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan, 

Pay rolls signed by Commander V. V. Woodward of the construction and repair 
department, 45 Broadway, and Mr. Gibbs of the International Mercantile Marine. 

ray rolls approved by Commander Woodward, when $5,000 or over. 

Contracts appnn'ed by Mr. Hague. 

Purchase approved by Mr. Hague when over $5,000. 
Very truly yours, 

Manager Construction and Repair Department. 



January 30, 1920. 
International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York City, 

(Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs, steamship Leviathan.) 

Gentlemen: It has come to the attention of this office that at the present time there 
is one IS-ton anchor, presumably belonging to the steamship Leviathan, now at the 
fleet supply base, South Brooklyn, New York. 

It is requested that you have some one investi^te this matter and if this anchor 

can be used on board tlie steamship Leviathan, advise this office and we will take the 

matter up and have same delivered to the vessel. 

Yours verv truly, 

R. L. Hague, 

By . 

Passenger Ship Section. Construction and Repair Department. 



Committee on F*uei.-Oil Specifications, 

Ste.kmship Leviathan, 
New York City, January SO, 1920. 

NO. 80. OPENING. 

The meeting wa? opened bv the chairman with the following present: 
Mr. W. F. Gibbs, chairman; Mr. J. S. Milne, of Todd Shipyards Corporation; Mr. W. 
L. MacQuillan. secretary' pro tem. 

The following were also present bv invitati/n: Mr. F. H. Gibbs, of the International 
Mercantile Marine Co.; Mr. E. A. ftodge, of W. & A. Fletcher Co.; Mr. W. J. Willis, 
of Morse Drv Dock <fe Repair Co.; Mr. David Galloway, superintending engineer, 
Lei'iathan: ^fr. Wm. Jamin. of Todd Shipyards Corporation; Mr. E. A. Stevens, jr., 
United States Shipping Board; Maj. J. S. McKinney, United States Army. 

NO. 81. ABSENCE OF MESSRS. DOBSON AND NICHOLS. 

The committee was advised that a telegram had been received from the Wm. Cramp 
& Sons Ship & Engine Building Co. to the effect that owing to illness, it was impoesible 
for Mr. Dobson to attend to-day's meeting; also a telegram from J. F. Nichols, of the 
committee, that it was impracticable for him to attend to-day's meeting. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1571 

NO. 82. P08TP0NSMBMT OF SEYSNTH RBOULAR MEISTINO. 

As a qnorum of the committee was not present, the seventh ref^ular meeting was 
postponed until 9.30 a. m. Thursday, February 5, 1920. 

NO. 83. INFORMAL JOINT MBKTINO WITH SUBCOJCmTrBB ON OIL BURNERS. 

The members of the committee present held an informal joint meeting with the 
sahcommittee on oil-burner tests. The chairman presented blue prints and commu- 
nications received from manufacturers of Dahl, B. and W. Peabody, Coen, and 
Schutte & Koerting oil burners, showing: anrangements desired by them in connection 
with boiler fronts for the testing of their bumera. These blue prints and communi- 
cations were carefully considered by the committee and the following conclusions 
were reached: 

(a) Tietjen & Lang Dry Dock Co., under the original order heretofore issued to 
them to prepare No. 10 boiler for these tests, to so construct the boiler front as to 
permit of the ready installation of the various types and arrangements of burners to 
1)6 tested. A uniform section of the front as determined to be arranged for expedi- 
tious removal and replace as required by the burner manufacturers. 

{h) The actual installation of burner eouipment and uniform sections of front to 
be arranged for by andat the expense of tne respective manufacturers, they to make 
the necessary arrangements direct, independent of the agents. The work of installa- 
tion may be done by respective manufacturers, by Tietjen A Land Dry Dock Co., or 
by any other reputable company as mav be desired by the manufacturers. 

(c) In connection with the baffling, the committee to make preliminary tests and 
arrange for the installation of tihe most efficient system of baffling practicable and 
should any individual manufacturer request a different arrangement of baffling in 
connection with the tests of his burners, said request to be considered on its merits 
by the committee at that time. However, one complete series of tests to be made 
of all burners with the boiler baffled as designated by the committee. 

NO. 84. POSSIBn.ITT OF BURNING REQUIRED AMOUNT OF FUEL OIL. 

Mr. Milne stated that he disagreed with Messrs. Nichols and Peabody, that it was 
possible to bum 2,240 pounds of fuel oil per hour per boiler, which amount of oil it is 
necessary to bum in order to obtain the maximum power now being figured upon by 
the committee. 

NO. 86. PERIODS OF TESTS. 

Each individual test at a particular rate of working will be for a period of four hours. 
The rates of working will be four, as follows: 0.2 pound of fuel oil per square foot of 
heatine surface; 0.3 pound of fuel oil per square foot of heating surtace; 0.4 pound of 
fuel oilper square foot of heatii^ surface; 0.5 pound of fuel oil per square foot of heat- 
ing surtace. This will allow curves of performance to be drawn and will require 
16 hours for the actual test of each burner. 

NO. 80. HYDROSTATIC TEST OF BOILER. 

It was decided that the boiler to be tested will be given a hydrostatic test com- 
plying with and in accordance with the rules of the Steamboat-Inspection Ser\dce, 
pnor to commencement of the oil-fuel burning test. 

NO. 87. OIL STORAGE HULL. 

Mr. Milne reported that he had ascertained from the Emergency Fleet Corporation 
that there was available their wooden hull No. 374, in which could be installed eight 
30-ton fuel oil tanks which were also available, as well as various other equipment 
Quired for storage and handling of fuel oil. The chairman will communicate with 
J^- Hague, of the Emergency Fleet Corporation and arrange with him to have this 
Ml and equipment made available and fitted up for account of the Emergency 
Fleet Corjjoration, as it will be a valuable addition to their floating equipment m the 
port after it had served its temporary purpose in connection with the fuel oil teste. It 
^^ decided that upon favorable action being had from the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration, Mr. Milne make the necessary arrangements to have this hull fitted up with 
necessary tanks, etc., and towed alongside the steamship Leviathan^ at which point the 
netjen A Lang Drydock Co. will do the necessary' work for account of the Emergency 
rleet Corporation to properly connect up the tanks, etc. In connection with the 



1572 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

• 
handling of fuel oil fDm the stim.'ire huU t> the LerUuhan, it was agreed that the best 
arransremcQt w >uld be the running of a stoam line from the T.ej^jathan to the hull and 
installin? a prop?r pump on the hull to handle the oil. The arrangemeT^t of st^vin 
piping to be such that it can be readilv disconnected at night. This plao will obviate 
the nece«itv of inHallinjs: donkev boiler on the hull or the use of a tusr, in order to 
furnish nece?sarv Pteam to operate pump, thuR providing the most etconomical and 
safe arrangem<»'it practicable. 

NO. 88. LIMIT or AIR PRESRtlRB FOR FORCED DRAFT TESTH. 

It was agreed that .the air pressure to be supplied for forced draft tests should be 
limited to 1} inches. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

At 10.50 a. m. the informal meeting adjourncl. 

Wm. L. MacQuillan, Secretani pro irm. 



January 29, 1?>20. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Ntir Yorl City. 
Attention of Mr. W. F. Gibbs, steamship Leviathan. 

Gentlembn: Referring to our telephone conversation of several days ago, we beg 
tn advise that up>n inve?tia:ati>n we have discovered that the above-mentioned 
steamer wa^ damasred on November 24, 1919, while Ivine at Pier 4, Hoboken, by the 
Unit**'! States Armv tug No. 6 while towing United States Navy lighter No. 50. 

It is requested that von investigate this matter and determine as to what extent 
this vessel was damaared, rendering a report to this office, in order that we may take 
up the matter with the Army transport department of paying for necessary repairs 
due to thia accident. 

Very tnily, yours, 

R. L. ITac.ue, 

By ; , 

Passenger Ship Sectiotiy ConstruHion anrf Repair Department, 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Construction Department, 

Hobohen, N. /., January fS, 19iO. 

Unitbd States Employees' Compensation Commission, 

Washington, D. C. 

Gentlemen: Inclosed herewith are forms C. A. L., C. A. 2, and C. A. 3 in con- 
nection with injurv' of Daniel J. Ryan, fireman employed on steamship Leviathan, 
which occurred on January 17, 1920. ... . 

The reason for delay in rendering this report was our inability to obtain the neces- 
sary blank forms at an earlier date. 
Yours, very truly, 

Master, 
Steajnship *' Leviathan.''' 
[Fii-st Indorsement.] 




h\)rwarded, with request that these papers be promi)tly transmitted through proper 
annels to the United States Compensation Commission, Washington, D. C. 



Chief op Construction. 
January 27, 1920. 



Memorandum for ( 'onstruction and Repair Department, 

Attention of Mr. W. L. Bunker. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, damaged on November 24, 1919, at Pier 4, by U S. 

Army tug No. 5, towing lighter, U. S. Navy lighter No. 50. 

In regard to this damage, will you please take the matter up with the Army Trans- 
pjrt Department and see if they will not repair this damage, as they are clearly re- 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 167S 

sponfeibLe for it. If you can not adjust it with them, if and when the damages are re- 
paired please send the bill to this office so that I may take the matter up for settlement. 

W. Davis Conrad, 
Assistant Admiralty Counsel. 

International Mercantilb Marine Co., 

CoNSTRUcnoN Department, 

New Yorky January f7, 19t0. 
Mr. E. A. Stevens, 

Emergejicy Fleet Corporation, United States Shipping Board, 

New York City. 

Dear Sir: Inclosed Herewith is copy of sixth regular meeting of committee on 
fuel-oil specifications, steamship Leviathan, • 

By oraer of the chairman : 

Wm. L. MacQuilla, 

Secretary pro tempore. 



January 27, 1920. 



STEAMSHIP "leviathan." 



One hull. No. 247. Iskum. 

Ei^ht tanks for oil; size, 16 feet, 3 inches by 19 feet; 30 tons. 

Three bilge pumps. 6 by 51 by 6 inches (also for oil transfer). 

One storage tank for D deck. 10 feet G inches by 9 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 9 inches. 

One measure tank, 50-gallon size. 21 by 36 inches. 

One receiving tank, 120-gallon size, 4 by 3 feet by 1 foot 6 inches. 

Valves, fittings, and pipes on bridge: 44 6-inch screw flanges (black); 16 6-inch 
flanged elbows (12 available). 

Heating: 1,600 feet 2-inch iron pipe (galvanized); 46 pairs 2-inch flange couplings; 
16 pairs 2-inch flange globe valves ; 1 3-inch flange globe valve at boiler. 

^Sounding and vent pipes: 450 feet 3-inch iron pipe; 9 3-inch double boss screw 
flanges. 

Heating storage tank on steamship: 60 feet 2-inch iron pipe: 2 2-inch double boas 
flanges (screwed); I 2-inch globe flan^ valve. 

Heating receiving tank: 20 l^-inch iron pipe; 1 l^-inch globe screw valve (screwed). 

Heater line from boilers to storage and receiving tank: 1,000 feet 2-inch iron pipe. 



LIST B, STEAMSHIP "LEVIATHAN." 



One transfer pump; size, about 9^ by 8 by 10 inches (10 by 6 by 12 inches available). 

Valves fitting and pipes on barge: 200 feet 6-inch pipe; 20 6-inch grate valves; 8 8- 
inch flanged crosses; 4 6-inch flanged tees. 

Heating: 176 2-inch' return bends; 1,800 1} -inch pipe; 206 return l^-inch bends; 
46 pairs l^-inch flange couplings; 16 l}-inch flange globe valves. 

•M>unding and vent pipes: 9 3-inch goosenecks; 9 3-inch deck plates; 

Heating stonige tank: 5 return 2-inch bends. 

Heating receiving tank: 3 l^-inch return bends; 2 l}-inch double boss flanges. 

Heater line from boilers to storage and receiving tank: 12 2-iiich flange tees; 6 2-inch 
flange tees. 

Feed water: 1 beam scale, 3-ton. 

Discharge pipe from barge to storage tank: 2G0 feet 4-inch iron pipe; 1 length 4-inch 
flexible tube, aoout 8 feet long, with couplings, galvanized sheet iron, about 22 inches 
gau^e; oil pans. 

Fire apparatus: Hose; hand fire pumps; 50 pairs 2-inch flange couplings; 400 feet 2- 
inch iron pipe; 25 pairs 2-inch flange globe valves. 

Feed water for Xo. 1 boiler: 1 Duplex pump, 7^ by 4i by 12 inches; 1 tank 3 feet 
diameter by 5 feet 9 inches long, 300 gallons; 1 lower tank, 6 feet by 5 feet 6 inches 
by 3 feet 3 inches, 800 ^llons; 50 feet of each size pipe, 3. 2^, 2, and 1^ inch; 6 cou- 
plings and ells, each 3 mches. 2i by 2 inches and l\ mcbes; 2 screwed globe valves, 

3 No. 2, 2}, 2, and H inch, or flanged. 

Discharge pipe from barge to storage tank steamship: 10 pairs 4-inch flange couplings - 

4 4-inch flange ells; 1 4-inch Lumbwe for support of oil tanks any size; bolts, nuts, and 
washers, (L. Keg } by 3 inches bolts and nuts). 

Fire apparatus: 1 Duplex, 10 by 6 by 12 inches, horizontal (Buffalo); 36 12 or 14 
quart buckets; 6 fire axes, 74 2i-inch galvanized fire extinguishers; asbestos mill 
board, about 36 inches square by i inch, any quantity required; 1 hand ash hoist, 



1574 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

complete, with 3 ash buckets; 1 set boiler fire tools, including hose slice ben sod 
shovcds; mooring hawsers. 

EXTRACT FROM THB MIKUTBS OP THE OOKFERENCB OF EXBCUTIVE HEADS OF TEE 
8HIPPINO BOARD AND THB EMBROENCY FLEET OORPORATION, JANUARY 27. 

The chairman reported confidentially as to bids received for the purchase jof the 
Leviathan. Mr. Hague was of opinion that the bids received were too low, but stated 
that he did not think the ship was of a type that could be profitably operated. Mr. 
Donald wau opposed to the view that this ship was of a poor type, stating that she was 
only five years old and was built by the Oermans to carry passengers. Mr. Hague 
replied that the Germans sold liquor on their ships, and he thought that was an 
important item in estimating whether or not Americao ships'ran be profitably oper- 
ated. The chairman stated that he had discussed this question with several Senators, 
and he was convinced that if the Shipping Board tried to sell liquor on ships both 
Houses of Congress would quickly pass legislation prohibitinj^ that from being done; 
but he was uncertain as to the attitude of Congress on this matter in respect to 
privately owned American ships. 

In response to the chairman's inquiry, Mr. Hague stated his opinion was that aJl 
of the ex-German ships should be sold. 



Division of Operations, 
United States Shiffino Board, 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, January 27, 1920. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Divieion of Operations. 

(Attention Mr. G. F. Blair.) 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

The steamship Leviathan was repaired on a time and material basis by Tietjen Sc 
Lang Dry Dock & Repair Co., at New York. 

The repairs to this vessel consisted of eight items in the deck and steward's depart- 
ments, the principal work being installing wooden covers for main and mizzen smoke- 
stacks, making same water-tight, relocating crew's messrooms in second-cabin smoke 
room, and preparing coal bunker for a test of water-tightness. 

The cost of these repairs is now $7,173.13, on a time and material basis. 

It was not considered practicable to submit this work for competitive bids, as this 
work was not estimated to be over $6,000. 

It is therefore requested that you authorize the expenditure of $7,173.13 for repairs 
to the steamship Leviathan on a time and material basis. 



Approved : 



Divieion of Operations. 

By , 

Assistant to Manager. 



Manager Construction and Repair Department. 



Specifications por FrmNo up One Boiler por Temporary Oil-Testing 

Apparatus. 

no. 1. boiler. 

These specifications are intended to cover the furnishing of material and labor to 
fit No. 10 boiler (aft port boiler forward fireroom), in the forward fireroom for the test- 
ing of oil burners, and will consist of the following: 

This boiler to be thoroughly cleaned, inside and out. Uptake dampers removed. 
The brickwork, grate bars, bearers, and supports to be removed and new brickwork 
as follows to be installed: 

Back walls. — The back and side walls will be covered with 2 inches of Nonpareil 
block and one layer of standard fire brick laid flat, bolted to the casing in an approved 
manner. The bottom of the fire box will have: 

First. A. 2-inch layer of Nonpareil block. 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1575 

Second. A 2-inch layer of powdered Silocel. 

Third. Two layers of l^-inch split brick laid to break joints. 

A faJse bottom will be laid in the boiler bottom resting on the present fore and aft 
corrugations, and thus forming an air space which will be connected to the forced 
draft ducts comii^ down the back of the boiler. The present openings into the ash 
pan to be blanked off and the damper gear removed, and the false bottom or duct to 
De connected at the front with a new furnace front to be supplied to suit the different 
burner manufacturers. (T^ fire brick and insulation to Be laid on top of this false- 
bottom.) The false bottom will be formed of }-inch steel plate and stiffened by suit- 
able flanged plates running fore and aft between the corrugations of the ash pan and 
resting on the bottom of the boiler. 

Baffles will be examined and changed if necessary. 

Front of boiler will be removed and new front and brickwork installed thereon to 
suit burners from djawj^ii^ tp be furnished by manufactiurer at his own expense. 

"Boiler connections will be treated as follows: 

Surface and bottom blow will be blanked. Steam and water gauges cleaned,. 
tested and put in good order. Hot-air heating boxes will be examined, thoroughly 
cleaned and sealed if necessary and the present retarders removed. All casing door» 
and openings, dampers and cut-outs in air ducts and uptakes on this boiler to be made 
workable and practically air tight. Openings to be cut for air pressure, gaug^, 
C. O. 2 apparatus as may be directed in the fronts, air ducts' and uptakes. A connec- 
tion for steam calorimeter will be furnished on the steam outlet, preferably beneatii 
the main stop valve. 

NO. 2. TANKS. 

A fuel oil storage tank of about 10 tons capacity (to be provided by owner), wiU be 
placed on staging properly constructed for its support, about 10 feet above D deck. 
%elow this, at a level of about 5 feet above D deck will be placed a measuring tank of 
about 50 gallons capacity on a scale supported by suitable staging from the deck, and 
below this, resting on the deck, will be a receiving tank of about 100 ^i^llons capacity. 
A 4-inch pipe lead from the storage tank down the outside of the ship, properly sup- 
ported, to a level near the water line, with standard flanged connection, and a valve 
will be placed in this line at the storage tank. 

A 3-inch pipe will be laid from the storage tank to the measuring tank with valve 
at the storage tank and a Duplex suction oil strainer will be interposed in this line in 
order to strain the oil before it goes to the measuring tank. 

A 3-inch pipe will lead from tne measuring tank to the receiving tank, with a valve 
at the measuring tank and a 2-inch pipe will be led from the receiving tank down 
through the forward cargo hatch and connected to the oil service pump. There will 
be a valve on this line at the receiving tank and also at the service pump. 

The fuel oil serv'ice pump will be furnished by the owner and will be capable of 
delivering not lees than 1 ton of oil per hour, at a pressure of not less than 250 pounds. 
This pump will discharge through a fuel oil heater of sufficient surface to heat the oil 
to a temperature of at least 300° F. A li inch relief valve will be fitted between 
the pump and the heater to discharge to the pump suction. From the pump a service 
line will be run to the front of the boilers to connect to the burners and return. 
In this line will be placed a Duplex discharge strainer and a thermometer near the 
burners, and two pressure gauges, one on each side of the discharge strainer. 

NO. 3. STEAM PIPING. 

Steam p^pes will be run to the supply tank on deck and a coil fitted in the bottom 
of same. This pipe to be nm alongside the 2-inch supply line leading from this tank 
to the fireroom. Steam will also be furnished for the oil-heater oil pump and the 
drain from the heater trapped and run to an inspection tank in a suitable location 
in the fireroom. 

A connection will be made between the main stop valve on the boiler and the 
auxiliary steam line with a valve at the connection with the auxiliary steam line^ 
the main boiler stop valve to be arranged for operation from the fireroom floor. 

NO. 4. WATER. 

A steel water-weighing tank of approximately 4,000 pounds' capacity will be fur- 
nished and placed on a scale on a raised platform in the fireroom. This tank to drain 
by gravity into a lower steel tank of 8,000 pounds' capacity (the tanks to be knocked 



1576 SHIPPING BOARD OPBRATJONS. 

down and erected in the fireroom), which will be connected to a feed pump to be 
furnished by owner, of sufficient capacity to furnish 40,000 pounds of water per hour 
at a pressure of 300 pounds. This pump will the boiler direct. A thermometer 
will be fitted in the dischai]!^ pipe between the pump and the boiler. 

An extension control rod will be carried from tne steam valve of the auxiliaiy feed 
pump nearest to the boiler to the mea.suring tank as above described, in order that 
an operator at the reserve tank can control the filling of same. A pipe will be led 
from the auxiliary feed line to the measuring tank, with a valve at the tank. 

NO. 5. AIR DUCTS. 

The present air ducts and one of the present blowers will be used to supply at least 
15,000 cubic feet of free air i)er minute at 1^ inches water pressure, and such of the 
present ducts and dampers will be banked off or properly closed to enable the above 
conditions to be obtained and maintained in the boiler under test. 

A by-pass will be arranged so that air can be blown into the fireroom in case this is 
necessary when running natural draft tests to maintain a positive air condition in 
the fireroom. 

A suitable steam jet and steam pipe leading from the auxiliary steam line, with 
pg^)er control valve, will be fitted m the uptake to create a draft in the boiler under 
test which will approximate the conditions when all boilers in this room are operating 
under natural draft. Provision should be made for a draft of approximately nine- 
tenths of an inch of water. 

A mercurial pyrometer for uptake shall be connected to the boiler passes and uptake 
in positions as directed. 

NO. 6. FLANS. 

The contractor will provide general arrangement and detailed plans as may be nec- 
essary to show the layout of apparatus and details of equipment lumished hereunder. 



January 26, 1920. 
(Memorandum forjudge Payne: Steamship Leviathan.) 
with return of inclosed correspondence which you sent for comment. 
As the builder of a steamer is in a far better position to rehabilitate same than any- 
one else, it is my opinion that we should permit Messrs. Bloom & Voss to submit 
bid for reconditioning the Leviathan in accordance with our plans and specifications, 
but this should be with the distinct understanding that we have the privil^^e of 
accepting or rejecting any or all bids. I believe that as a matter of policy this would 
have a very wholesome effect upon our American bidders. 

R. L. Hague, 
Manager Construction and Repair Department. 



National Mbrcantilb Marine Co., 

Office Chief op Construction, 

New York, January 26, 1990. 
Mt M l- UAnuB, 

U»MiUi/«r i>i vision of Cormtructlon and Repair, 

United States Shipping Board, E. F. C, New York City. 
hulvitnt Ta^t of oil fuel burners and boiler, steamship Leviathan. 
hivMi Sir: Referring to and confirming our recent coni'ersation, we inclose here- 
\s\\\\ Hpocifications covoring the armngements for the proposed test of boiler and oil 
liuiuiTH on the ntearnHhip Leviathan, and, subject to your approval, we purpose to 
huvn this work done by the Tiotjen & Lang ("o. 

In view of the nature of the work and the necessity for considerable changes from 
tln)e to time to meet conditions which may arise and which we can not foresee now, 
wo surest that thiH work be done on a dav's work basis. 

Kindly adviHC us as promptly as po3.«ible of your decision, in order that no delay 
may ensue. 

Very truly, yours, 

(Signed) William Francis Gibbs, 

, ., . Chief of Construction. 

Copy to ( •. A. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1577 

Committee on Fuel On^ Specifications "Leviathan," 

New York City, January 2S, 1920, 

Sixth Regular Meeting. 

no. 66. OPENING. 

The meeting waa opened by the chairman, with the following present: 

Mr. W. F. Gibbs, chairman- Mr. W. A. Dobson. of William Cramp & Pons f^ hip and 
Engine Building Co.; Mr. J. F. Nichols, of Newport News Shipbiiiidinc: & Dry JDock 
Co.: Mr. J. S. Milne, of Todd Shipyards Corporation; Mr. W. L. MacQuillan, secretary 
pro tem. 

The following were also present by invitation: 

Mr. F. H. Gibbs, of the International Mercantile Marine Co.; Mr. E. A. Hodge, of 
W. A A. Fletcher Co.; Mr. E. A. Stevens, of the Emergency Fleet Corporation: Mr. 
William Jamin, of Todd Shipyards Corporation: Mr. W. J. Willis, of Morse D. I & R. 
Co.: Mr. W. R. Freeman, of Newport ^ews Shipbuilding; & Dry Dock Co.: Mr. "E. H. 
Peabody; Mr. A. F. Schreiber, of Newport News Shipbuilding h Dry Dock Co. ; Com- 
mander Woodward, United States Navy; Maj. J. S. McKinney, United States Army; 
Mr. David Galloway, superintending engineer Leviathan. 

NO. 66. MINUTES. 

The minutes of the last regular meeting were approved. 

NO. 67. TANKAGE. 

Mr. Dobson submitted the following report of arrangement of fuel-oil tanks, as 
decided at committee meeting of January 16. 1920. 

STEAMSHIP ** leviathan" — NOTES ON FUEL-OIL ARRANGEMENT AS DECIDED AT COM 

MTTTEE MEETING OF JANUARY 16, 1920. 

The present bulkheads, Nos. 224, 245, and 270, are provided with stiffeners spaced 
approximately 30 inches. The stiffeners and bulkiiead plating appear to be in 
a satisfactory condition. In the bunkers the bituminous coating nas given very 
good protection to the steelwork, and it is believed that it will not be necessary to 
renew any of this work. The stiffeners on bulkheads No. 270 and No. 245 in way 
of cold-storage space and in way of pig-iron ballast forward of No. 270 could not be 
seen. 1 he stiffeners on bulkhead ^o. 224 below K deck do not appear to meet the 
requirements of the American Bureau of J^ hipping rules for fuel- oil bidkheads. It 
is suggested that between the present stiffeners there be provided a 10-inch channel 
stiffener, the same to be well bracketed at the top and bottom. The plating of this 
bulkhead is not up to the American bureau requirements, but with tnis additional 
stiffening, together with the welding of all the butts and seams which are double 
riveted, it is thought that a satisfactory bulkhead will be obtained. Bulkheads No. 
245 and No. 270 may be considered in the same light. \Miile Ihe present stiffeners 
above K deck appear to be strong enough to carry the load, the plating is of such 
thickness that intermediate stiffeners appear desirable. These stiffeners need not 
be bracketed but only clipped to the decfe plating above and below. There should 
be added a longitudinal center line bulkhead between frames No. 270 and No. 245 and 
two longitudinal wing bulkheads between No. 245 and No. 224 . Transverse bulkheads 
at frames No. 261, No. 253, and No. 2.34 should be water-tight and extend to H deck 
between frames No. 234 and No. 245, and J deck between No. 245 and No. 270. A 
longitudinal swash bulkhead should be provided in each of the tanks. This pro- 
vides for 12 fuel tanks forward of frame No. 224, exclusive of the double-bottom com- 
partments. The weight of the new bulkheads will be approximately 275 tons, the 
^ei^ht of additional stiffeners on bulkheads No. 224, No. 245, and No. 270 35 tons, 
closing of present deck openings 20 tons. Intermediate deck beams over the top 
of each deck should be titled on account of the thickness of the present deck plating 
and the fact that the seams are single riveted. This weight will amount to approxi- 
mately 35 tons. 
The approximate weight of the settling tanks which will be installed abreast each 

boiler room, extending from the present longitudinal bulkhead to the inner face of 
present web frames and extending up to H deck, will be approximately 75 tons. 

Additional stiffeners will be necessary on the present wing biukheads in way of the 

settling tanks. Also, the closing of any openings in H deck which may come over the 

177068— 20— PT 4 22 



1578 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

space alloted to settling tanks and intennediate deck beams in way of same. This 
weight will be approximately 20 tons. 

The total weij»nt of new bulkheads and additional stiffening, etc.^ as provided lor 
above, is 460 tons. It will probably be desirable to remove present nonwatertight 
bulkheads in coal bimkers and also tnmks which extend below the top of the proposed 
oil tanks. 

This report is preliminary and will be supplemented by more positive information 
after the removal of the ballast and insulation, which now prevents an examination 
of the lower portion of bulkheads No. 245 and No. 270. 

APPROXIMATE CAPACITY FOR FUEL OIL AS PER ARRANGEMENTS DECIDED AT COMMITTEE 

MEETING OF JANUARY 16, 1920. 

Tons of 2,240 pounds at 7.65''' per gallon: 

Forepeak 153 

I. B. tank- 
No. 1 '. 170 

No. 2 P. & S 342 

No. 3 P. &-S 387 

No. 4 P. & S. C. L. and wing 621 

No. 5 P. & S. C. L. and wing 396 

No. 6 P. & S. C. L. and wing 379 

Total I. B. forward of frame 173 2. 2»5 

Wing tanks No. 24 P. & 8. frames No. 224-No. 245 478 

Coal bimkers' frames No. 224-No. 345 565 

Space frames No. 224-No. 245 K to J deck 840 

Space frames No. 224-No. 245 J to H deck 975 

Total spaces frames No. 245-No. 270 below H deck 3, 958 

Wing tanks No. 23 P. & S. frames No. 245-No. 270 514 

Cargo hold frames No. 245-No. 270 745 

Space frames No. 245-No. 270 L to K deck 615 

Space frames ^'o. 245-No. 270 K to J deck 700 

2, 574 

Total spaces frames No. 245-No. 270 below J deck, tons 8. 980 

Ap])roximate capacity of storage tanks: 
Settling tanks extending to H deck — 

Abreast No. 1 fireroom, frames No. 209-No. 212, P. and S. . . : 160 

Abreast No. 2 fireroom, frames No. 174-No. 178, P. and 8 230 

Abreast No. 3 fireroom, frames No. 170-No. 174, P. and S 230 

Abreast No. 4 fireroom, frames No. 136-No. 140, P. and S 210 

Total in settling tanks, tons 830 

68. ARRANGEMENT OF SETTLING TANKS. 

After discussion by the committee it was agreed that each of the two iirerooms 
contained in a water-tight boiler compartment should have two settling tanks. This 
means that there will be a total of 10 settling tanks, with a capacity of 1,000 tons of 
oil for the lot, or each of the settling tanks will have a capacity of 62J tons. These 
tanks will be placed in the present side bunkers extending up to H deck, and will 
be arranged so as not to interfere with the present bunker doors to the fireroom 
or coaling arrangements, having in mind the possibility of the ship having to bum 
coal. These tanks should also be so placed that doors may be cut therein and they 
may be made available for coal with a minimum of expense and difficulty, and the 
shape should \ye such that ample fore-and-aft access in the bunkers between these 
tanks and the skin of the ship may be provided for working coal when the ship is 
used as a coal burner. 

69. CAPACITY OF CONDENSING PLANT. 

The question of the capacity' of the existing condensing plant to satisfactorily handle 
steam generated under conditions of overload was discussed in considerable detail, 
and it was the census of opinion that as the condenser surface is not disproportionate to 
the amount required under overload conditions it was reasonable to assume that 
after such changes as were possible had been made in the way of improving vacuum 



SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 1579 

the condensing plant would satisfactorily handle excess steam under overload con- 
ditions. In this connection Conunander Woodward, of the United . States Navy, 
remarked that the vessel had consistently held 97 per cent of her vacuum under all 
conditions and that the turbines would produce all the power that her boilers were 
capable of furnishing steam for. The question whether tne openings, etc., in boilers 
were large enough to permit of the enicient passing of excess quantities of steam 
generated was discussed, and it was pointed out that bv using both main and auxil- 
iary stop valves objectionable drop in pressure coula be prevented and pressure 
equalized. 

70. SPECIFICATIONS. 

It was agreed that Mr. Nichols would work up the necessary piping arrangement 
details in connection with specifications for the location of settling tanks in cooper^ 
ation with Mr. ^lilne and that these two will work up the necessary specification fo 
the arrangement of pumps, piping, etc.; Mr. Dobson to work up specifications for 
the structural details necessary in connection with the tankage arrangement, as 
discussed in Minute No. 67, alx)ve. Mr. Dobson will also investigate the feasibility 
and practicability of lighting up the present longitudinal bulkhead system. 

71. REMOVAL OP COAL-BURNINO KQUIPMENT. 

The question having arisen as to whether or not all of the equipment, such as ash 
ejectors and the like installed for use in connection with the burning of coal, should 
be entirely removed, the chairman remarked that a condition might arise in the 
future which would make it very desirable to revert to coal burning with the least 
possible delay, and it was agreed that in considering the question of the removal of 
this character of equipment the advantages of such removal would be carefully 
weighed in comparison with the advantages derived from having such equipment 
available on board should it be decided to revert to coal burning in future, and in 
placing oil-fuel eouipment aboard should be installed in such a position as not to 
interfere with working the vessel as a coal burner. 

72. RPKCIFIC GRAVITY OF FT' EL OIL. 

It was decided that in connection with the test of oil burners and specifications for 
oil-burning equipment arrangements should be made to burn Mexican fuel oil 
having specific gravity of 11° Haum^ instead of 14° Mexican oil previously decided 
upon, l)ecau6e in the light of information coming to the committee on the oil-fuel 
situation it would be the rxirt of wisdom to provide for the burning of this grade of 
oil. as probabilities were that a higher grade of oil would be increasingly difficult to 
obtain in the future and that 11° oil is presently being successfully used in certain 
Hkirine installations. 

NO. 73. SPECIFICATIONS FOR OIL BURNER TEST. 

Mr. Milne presented the draft of specifications for fitting up one boiler for temporary 
oil testing apparatus and after careful consideration of the same by the committee, 
the following were adopted : 

Specifications for fitting up one boiler for temporary oil testing apparatus: 

NO. 1. BOILER. 

These specifications are intended to cover the furnishing of material and labor to 
fit No. 10 boiler (aft port boiler forward fireroom), in the forward fireroom for the testing 
of oil burners, and will consist of the following: 

This boiler to be thoroughly cleaned, inside and out. Uptake dampers removed. 
The brickwork, grate bars, bearers and supports to be removed and new brickwork as 
follows to be installed: 

fiadb vHiUs. — ^The back and aide walls will be covered with 2 inches of Nonpariel 
hlock and one layer of standard fire brick laid flat, bolted to the casing in an approved 
nianner. The bottom of the fire box will have: 

First: A 2-inch layer of Nonpareil block. 

Second: A 2-inch layer of powdered SUocel. 

Third: Two layers of li-inch split brick laid to break joints. 

A false bottom will be laid in the boiler bottom resting on the present fore and aft 
^^^nigations, and thus forming an air space which will be connected to the forced draft 
<luct8 coming down the back of the boiler. The present openings into the ash pen to 



1580 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

be blanked off and the damper f^sa removed, and the ^Isc bottom or duct to be con- 
nected at the front with a new furnace front to be supplied to suit the different burner 
manufacturers. (The fire brick and insulation to be laid on top of this fidse bottom.) 
The false bottom will be farmed of }-inch steel plate and stiffened by suitable flanged 
plates running fore and aft between the corrugations of the ash pan and resting on the 
bottom of the boiler. 

Baffles will be examined and changed if necessary. 

Front of boiler will be removed and new front and brick work installed thereon to 
suit burners from drawing to be furnished by manufacturer at his own expense. 

Boiler connections will be treated as followsc 

Surface and bottom blow will be blanked. Steam and water gauges cleaned, tested 
and put in good order. Hot air heating boxes will be examined, thoroughly cleaned 
and sealed if necessary and the present retarders removed. All casing doors and open- 
ings, dampers and cutouts in air ducts and uptakes on this boiler to be made woruiUe 
and practically air tight. Openings to be cut for air pressure, gauges. (^. 0. 2 apparatus 
as may be directed in the fronts, air ducts and uptakes. A connection for steam 
calorimeter will be furnished on the steam outlet, preferably beneath the main stop 
valve. 

NO. 2. TANKS. 

A fuel-oil storage tank of about 10 tons capacity (to be provided by owner), will be 
placed on staging properly constructed for its support, aoout 10 feet above D deck. 
Below this, at a level of about 5 feet above D deck will be placed a measuring tank of 
about 50 gallons capacity on a scale supported by suitable staging from the deck, and 
below this, resting on the deck, will be a receiving tank of about 100 ^Uons capacity. 
A 4-inch pipe lesd from the storage tank down the outside of the ship, properly sup- 
ported, to a level near the water line, with standard flanged connection, and a valve 
will be placed in this line at the storage tank. 

A 3-inch pipe will be laid from the storage tank to the measuring tank with a valve 
at the storage tank and a duplex suction oil strainer will be interposed in thia line in 
order to strain the oil before it goes to the measuring tank. 

A 3-inch pipe will lead from the measuring tank to the receiving tank, with a valve 
at the measuring tank and a 2-inch pipe will be led from the recei\'ing tank down 
through the forward cargo hatch and connected to the oil-service pump. There will 
be a valve on this line at the receiving tank and also at the service pump. 

The fuel-oil service pump will be furnished by the owner and will be capable <rf 
delivering not lees than 1 ton of oil per hour, at a pressure of not less than 250 pounds. 
This pump will discharge through a fuel-oil heater of sufficient surface to heat the 
oil to a temperature of at least 300° F. A IJ-inch relief valve will be fitted between 
the pump and the heater to discharge to the pump suction. From the pump a service 
line will be run to the front of the boilers to connect to the burners and return. In 
this line will be placed a duplex discharge strainer and a thermometer near the burners, 
and two pressure gauges, one on each side of the discharge strainers. 

NO. 3. STEAM PIPINC5. 

St^^am nijMv w ill Im» run to the supply tank on deck and a coil fitted in the bottom of 
fluno. Tnin pip** to be run alonj^'side the 2-inch supply line leading from this tank to 
tiif» lin»ron!n. Sti»nm will also be furnished for the oil-heater oil pump and the drain 
from tho hoator trapped, and run to an inspection tank in a suitable location in the 

\ nuitioction vd\l he made between the main stop valve on the boiler and the 
ini^lM»ty Htoam line, with a valve at the connection y>iih the auxiliar>' steam line; 
(In* mniii boiler stop valve to be arranged for operation from the fireroom floor. 

NO. 4. WATER. 

A Hteel wat(?r-wei^'hing tank of approximately 4,000 pounds capacity will be fiu-- 
nished and placed in a scale on a raised platform in the nreroom. This tank to drain 
i)y gravity into a lower steel tank of 800 pounds capacity (the tanks to be knocked 
down and oroct«»d in the fireroom), which will be connected to a feed pump to be fur- 
nished by owner, of sufficient capacity to furnish 40,000 pounds of water per hour at a 
pre-HHuro of 300 pounds. This pump will feed the boiler direct. A thermometer 
will he fitted in the discharge pipe between the pump and the boiler. 

An extension control rod will be carried from tne steam valve of ihe auxiliary feed 
pump nearest to the boiler to the measuring tank as above described, in order that an 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1581 

operator at the reserve tank can control the filling of 9a me. A pipe Mill be led from 
tne auxiliary feed line to the measuring tank, -nith a valve at ttie tank. 

NO. 5. AIR DUCTS. 

The present air ducts and one of the present blowers ^ill be used to supply et least 
15.000 cubic feet of free air per minute at l^-inch water pressure, and such of the present 
ducts and dampers ^ ill be blanked off or properly closed to enable the above conditions 
to be obtained and maintained in the boiler under test. 

A by-pass will be arranged so that air can be blown into the fireroom in case this is 
necessary when nmning natural-draft tests to maintain a positive air condition in the 
fireroom. 

A suitable steam jet and steam pipe leading from the auxiliary steam line, ^ith 
proper control valve, ^ill be fitted in the uptake to create a draft in the boiler under 
test, which will approximate the conditions when all boilers in this room are operating 
under natural draft. Provision should be made for a draft of approximately nine- 
tenths of an inch of water. 

A mercurial pvrometer for uptake shall be connected to the boiler passes and uptake 
in positions as directed. 

NO. 6. PLANS. 

The contractor will provide general arrangement and detailed plans as may be 
necessary to show the layout of apparatus and details of equipment furnished here- 
under. 

NO. 74. RBCB88. 

(At 1.15 p. m. the committee recessed until 2.15 p. m.) 



NO. 76. RBSUMFnON OV SBSSION. 

At 2.15 p. m. the committee resumed its session. 

Preparation of boiler for test. — Th^i comn'ittce carefully studied blue prints sub- 
mitted by Mr. Milne, 8ho\*ing construction of boiler selected for oil-burner test and it 
was agreed that in view of the impracticability of specifying all of the details in 
advance, the work should be done on a daywork basis by the Tietjen & Lang Dry 
Dock Co., under the general supervision of Mr. Milne. In this connection it was 
agreed that it would be necessary and desirable that exactly the same kind of fuel 
oil be supplied throughout the entire period of test and on the suggestion of Mr. Milne, 
it was su^eed that he should endeavor to secure the loan of an oil bai^ fitted with 
necessary tanks from the Emergency Fleet Corporation, which could be moored 
alongside the Leviathan as a source of fuel supply. 

NO. 77. CONFERENCE WITH OIL-BURNER REPRESENTATIVES. 

.\t 3 p. m. the committee again recessed in order to go into a conference >^ith the 
following gentlemen, representing several of the oil burners which are to be tested: 
Mr. J. W. Penn, Mr. J. S. Patten, Mr. H. W. Philbrook and Mr. A. McPhee, of Schutte- 
Koerting; Mr. J. E. Lawrence, and Mr. Thomas Service, of Dahl Co.; Mr. H. B. 
Chamberlin, and Mr. F. H. Hall, of Ooen Co. 

The chairman outlined to .these representatives the method proposed for fitting 
up one boiler for temporary oil testing apparatus as outlined in minute 73 above, 
and it was ascertained that the procedure proposed mot with their approval. The 
chairman further indicated to them that each company would be required to submit, 
without delay, a plan showing the arrangement of boiler front desired by them in 
connection with the test of their burners, which they agreed to furnish. In answer 
to various questions, the following information was furnished by the chairman : 

(a) Test would be conducted for each burner under conditions of forced draft, as 
well as natural draft. 

(6) No data would be given out by the agents until all of the tests had been com- 
pleted. 

(c) Not more than one representative of competing burners would be permitted 
to witnesR individual tests of other burners. 

[d) Dampers would not be permitted in stack. In lieu of this, the outlets from 
other spaces would be blanked off. 

(a) Rearrangement of baffling to suit conditions would be considered. 



1582 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

(/) Reaaonable time would be allowed to preliminary test boilers, etc., before 
the starting of each official test, but the time for such preliminary work will be limited. 

{g) The order of test of burners was determined by drawing lots, with the follow- 
ing reeulte: (1) Peabody; (2) Dahl; (3) Peabody B. & W.; (4) White; (5) Schutte- 
Koerting; (6) Coen. It was understood that the committee has not defiiiitely de- 
cided as vet to test Peabody burner and in the ev'ent decision is not reached prior 
to boiler being ready for test, the next burner in order/ namely, Dahl, will be t^ted 
first. 

(A) All burners and new boiler fronts as required will be furnished at the expense 
of the burner manufacturer. 

NO. 78. RESUMPTION OF SESSION. 

At 3.30 p. m. the representatives of the oil burners above mentioned withdrew 
and the committee resumed its session. 

NO. 79. GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS. 

The full committee then proceeded to go over informally with Mr. Nichols cer- 
tain blue prints and a draft of specifications of oil fuel burning equipment, tilling 
pipes, other piping, pumps, etc. Agreement was tentatively reached on the main 
outlines of this general specification and Messrs. Milne and Nichols will proceed 
at once with the development thereof with a view to its submittal at the next meeting 
of this committee. In this connection it was agreed that there would \)e an oil filter 
arrangement provided, so that the oil might be filtered out of the ballajst water dis- 
charge from ballast tanks while in h^bor. It was also decided that it was essential 
to provide for a head of oil on the tanks at least up to G deck and to also provide four 
filling connections on each side of the vessel. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

At 4.45 p. m. the committee adjourned, to meet again at 9.30 a. m., January 30, 
1020. 



Secretary pro iem. 

. • 

January 23, 1920. 
Memorandum for Mr. Jacob. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

Capt. Heintz of the Admiralty Division has requested that he be informed as to 
whether or not the repairs on the steamship Leviathan^ which were made necessary 
by collision with an Army tug, have been completed to date. 

E. P. Mason. 



Confidential Restricted Distribution. 

January 22, 1920. 

[Cabtogram from Hamburg; received Jan. 0, 1920.] 

IGNITED States Shipping Board: 

Understand from Mr. Sckel that your administration intends reconverting Leina- 
than ex-Vaterland from troopship into passenger steamer, also change from coal to 
oil fuel, and that ship will be practically rebuilt. Consider that as builder of original 
ship and possessing extended experience gathered during constructing and from first 
service trips we can if intrusted with the order be of material assistance to your admin- 
istration by saving time and money and assuring first-class expedition work. 

Wire if interested. 

Blohm Und Voss. 

Chairman Payne for action; Cushing, Steven?, Donald, and Scott for attention. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1583 

Division of Opehations, 
Unitbd States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Nein York. Janiiarii 20, 1920. 

From: Thoe. J. Miggins, aasifitant comptroller, New York, N. Y. 
To: Mr. George W. Sterling, assistant director of operations, New York City, N. Y. 
Subject: Memorandum regarding approvals on expenditures steamship LeiiaOian. 
(Attention Mr. Hague.) 

Dear Sir: Inclosed find memorandum regarding approvals on expenditures for 
reconditioning the steamship Lei-iathan. 

This memorandum has been made up from the contract and letters we have received 
regarding same. 

Will you kindly let mo know as soon as pjsaible if this memorandum meets with 
your understanding of said approvals. 
Yours, very truly, 

ThOS. J. MiOGINS, 

Assistant Comptroller. 

By W. P. GlLLILAN, 

Auditor of Disbursements. 



Division op Operations, 
Unitbd States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

* New York, January 20, 1920. 

Memorandum regarding reconditioning steamship Leviathan, 

Additional approvals for expenditures under contract with the International Mer> 
cantile Marine for reconditioning the steamship Leviathan are as follows: 

P&y rolls signed by Capt. Ryan of the passenser ship section. No. 45 Broadway, 
and Sir. Gibbe of the International Mercantile ^larine. 

Pay rolls approved by Mr. Jacob of the same section, when $5,000 or over. 

Contracts approved by Mr. Hague. * 

Purchases approved by Mr. Hague when over $5,000. 

W. P. GlLLILAN, Auxlitor of Disbursements. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Construction Department, 

New York, January 19, 1920. 



Mr. R, L. Hague, Ex officio Manager Repair and Construction Division, United States 
Skipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: Inclosed herewith is copy of fifth regular meeting of committee on fuel 
oil specificatioiis, steamship Leviathan. 
By order of the chairman. 

Wm. L. MacQuillan, Secretary pro tern. 



January 17, 1920. 
Mr. W. M. Rice, 

District Manager Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York, N. Y. 

My Dear Mr. Rice: Thank you very much for your kind assistance in allowing us 
to use Mr. E. A. Stevens to conduct the series of oil burning tests on the boilers of the 
^eamsbip Leviathan. 

It is our intention, in order to test the White, Coen, Dahl, Peabody, and Schuttes- 
Koerting systems, to allow each of the above firms a chance to demonstrate, under 
•ctual working conditions aboard the Leviathan, the advantages of their respective 
systems, and Mr. Stevens will conduct these tests for us. 

We will be very glad to furnish you with the results for your records. 
Yours, very truly, 

Manager, Construction and Repair Department. 
C^opy to Mr. W. F. Gibbs, I. M. M. 



1584 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

« 

January 17, 1920. 
Mr. E. A. Stevens, 

Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York, N. Y. 
Steamship Leviathan, 

Dear Sir: Allow us to thank you verv much for your offer of assistance in con- 
ducting the series of oil-burning tests on tiie boilers of the above-named vessel. 

As vou are aware, it is our intention, in order to test the \^ite, Coen, Dahl, Peabody, 
and Schutte-Koerting systems, to allow each of the above firms a chance to demon! 
strate, under actual working conditions aboard the steamship Leviathan, the ad vantage^ 
of their respective systems, and your assLstance in the handling of these tests will b 
of great benefit to us. 

Will you therefore please report to Mr. W. F. Gibbs, Chief (Constructor of the loter- 
national Mercantile Marine Co., which is acting as our agent in this matter, and Mr. 
Gibbs will give you the necessary instructions. 
Yours, very truly, 

Manager Construction and Repair Department. 
Copy to \V. F. Gibbs, I. M. M. 

January 16. 1920. 

[Suggested letter to IntematlonAl IfercantUe Marine Co.. covering approvals given by the Shipping 

Board under Leviathan reconditioning contract.] 

Subject: Ijeviathan reconditioning contract, dated December 17, 1919. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York City. 
Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs. 

Dear Sirs: Referring to letter of January 14, from the chairman, designating the 
writer as the representative of the Shipping Board for the approvals necesnry under 
the contract dated December 17, 1919. 

This Mrill serve to ratify and confirm any approvals given by Messrs. Dunning, 
Linck, and Eamshaw to date. 
Very truly. 



January 16, 1920. 

Memorandum for Mr. T. J. Miggins, assistant comptroller, New York City. 
Attention of Mr. \V. P. Gillelen, jr. 

I am inclosing copv of memorandum which has been received from Mr. R. L. 
Hague, notif>dng me that it will be in order for Mr. Jacob of the passenger ship section 
of Construction and Repair to approve pay rolls for the steamship Leviathan when in 
excess of $5,000, after tne same nave been passed by Capt. Ryan. Will you kindly 
be governed by the above. 

Tnere is further inclosed a copy of a letter under date of January 14, addressed to 
Mr. P. A. S. Franklin, president of the International Mercantile Marine Co. by Chair- 
man Pa>Tie, notifying him that in accordance with clause II — B of the reconditioning 
agreement between the above mentioned corporation and ourselves, Mr. R. L. Hague 
has been designated as the Shipping Board representative, effective the date of the 
agreement. 

Therefore my interest in the matter shall cease, and all matters pertaining to the 
reconditioning'of the steamship Leviathan and the approval of requisitions and pur- 
chases bv the International Mercantile Marine Co., acting as agent for the Shipping 
Board, shall be sent to Mr. Hague for his sijc^ature. 

I wish to thank you for the cooperation which the romptroller 's office has given me 
during mv brief period as liaison between the Shipping Board and the Inteniational 
Mercantile Marine Co. 

G. S. Earnshaw, Senior CUrh. 

DivLsioN OF Operations, 
United States Shippino Board Emergenty Fleet Corporation, 

New York, January 26, 1920. 
European trades. 

Memorandum to Construction and Repair Department. 
Attention of Mr. R. L. Hague, manager. 

There is attached a letter which was handed to me some time in the earlv part of 
January from the turbine department of the Construction and Repair relative to 
«M3mo blading material for the steamship Lniathan. 



SHIPPING BuARD OPfcRATIONb. 1585 

I ^t in touch with the navy yard and recjueeted them to forward this blading 
material to Mr. Good at the Kent Avenue storeroom. 

Mr. Good informed me by phone to-day that the blading material had been received, 
a list of which is attached. 

I have further notified Mr. Gibbs that should any blading material be necessary 
in the reconditioning of the Leviathan, we have a certain amount on hand at the Kent 
Avenue storeroom. 

Yours, very truly, 

G. Earnfhaw, 
For Division of Opirations. 



Navy Yard. Supply Department, 

iVftt' York, Nortmbtr 14. 1919. 
From: Supply officer, navy yard, New York. 

To: T'nited States Shipping Board Fmergency Fleet Corporation, New York City. 
Attention of Mr. W. F. RusseU. 

Subject: Turbine blading material for the U. S. S. Leviathan. 
Reference: (a) Your letter, dated November 12, 1919. 

1. In re^rd to the above reference, a small amount of turbine blading cut and 
ready for installation has been located in the machinery division, and same will be 
inventoried and a list forwarded to you. 

2. Information is requested as to whether the material for the U. S. S. Ltriathan 
is to be invoiced to the Shipping Board, and also the location where this material 
is to be delivered. 

H. A. Reynolds, 

By direction. 

January 16, 1920. 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

United States Shipping Board, Philadelphia^ Pa. 
Attention of Mr. A. (^onti, chief engineer. Snip Construction Division. 
Subject: Oil-burning equipment. 

This acknowledges receipt of your letter of December 22, to Mr. Jett, which came 
to my notice this morning. 

The oil-burning equipment has not been ordered. The White, Coen, Dahl, Pea- 
bodv, and Schutte-Koerting are all being considered, and we would be glad to be 
advised of the results of your tests when completed. 

For your information, will say we are rigging up aboard the Leviathan tvo boilers 
and intend making a test of each of the above-mentioned systems before deciding which 
will finally be approved. 
Yours, very truly. 

Manager, 
Construction and Repair Department. 



Committee on Fuel Oil Specifications Steamship *' Leviathan," 

New Yorhf January 16 , 1920. 

Fifth Regular Meeting. 

NO. 53. opening. 

The meetiog was opened by the chairman, witn the followingmembers present: 
Mr. W. F. Gibbs, chairman; M. R. L. Hague, ex officio; Mr. W. A. Dobson, of Wm. 
Cramp & Sons Ship &, Engine Building Co. ; Mr. J. S. Milne, of Todd Shipyards Corpora- 
tion; Mr. A. F. Schreiber, representmg Mr. J. F. Nichols, of Newport News Ship- 
building & Dry Dock Co. ; Mr. W. L. MacQuillan, secretary pro tern. 

The following gentlemen were also present by invitation: Mr. F. H. Gibbs, of the 
International Mercantile Marine Co.; Mr. E. A. Hodge, of W. & A. Fletcher Co.; Mr. 
Wm. Jamin, of Todd Shipyards Corporation; Mr. W. J. Willis, of Moree Dry Dock & 
Repair Co.; Mr. E. H. Peabody; Mr. David Galloway, superintending engineer 
steamship Leviathan. 

no. 54. MINUTES. 

The minutes of the last regular meeting were approved. 



1586 smppmo boabd oFBBAXioifrs. 

NO. 55. BIDS TANKS. 

Mr. Dobflon reported that he had investigated the question of constnicting discon- 
tinuous wing oil tanks extending from the present coal bunker bulkheads to the skm 
of the ship and divided by recesses giving open access from skin of ship to boiler room 
and could see no method by which there could be secured with such an installation 
symmetrical flooding in the damaged condition avoiding a list. A bilging accident 
would put the vessel over 40°, placing the bulkhead deck under water. The approxi- 
mate weight of the oil bunkers arranged with double bulkheads amounts to about 
1,000 tons without any piping. With the single bulkhead the weight Would be approx- 
mately 800 tons, or a proportion of about 8 to 10, not taking into consideration the 
weight of the present coal Dunker bulkheads. Allowing for the latter, the net weight 
would be, respectively, 700 and 500 tons. In other words if tanks were run to the skin 
of the ship, there would he a saving of about 200 tons in weight over the double bulk- 
heads but it would be impossible to secure symmetrical flooding. The following is 
his detailed report written thereon: 

Approximate weight of oil bunkers arranged in general as in Case I, shown on 
drawmg S. O. 3159 of December 28, 1919, is 1,000 tons. 

BulloLeads below H deck consist of one longitudinal 34 feet from center line of ship 
and extending full length of four firerooms, one longitudinal 5-inch inboard of shell and 
extending for 250 feet or as far in to the space abreast the forward fireroom as practica- 
ble, seven transverse between the longitudinals, being 11 feet wide in way of the greatest 
beam of the vessel. Connecting the longitudinal bulkheads are struts arranged that 
the bending moments in each panel of the vertical stiff eners are similar. There is no 
connection between the shell and the outer longitudinal bulkhead. 

Between H and G decks there will be two longitudinal bulkheads the full length of 
the firerooms, one 5 feet from shall and the other 18 inches outboard of the uptake 
casings, and eight transverse bulkheads, two in way of each fireroom between the 
longitudinals. 

The sam^ arrangement applies to both sides of the ship and present pump rooms 
retained, and their weight, together with present main transverse bulkheads between 
firerooms, is not included. 

Approximate weight of oil bunkers arranged as per the suggestion of the chairman 
at the meeting of December 31, 1919, is 800 tons. 

This arrangement consists of one longitudinal bulkhead on each side 34 feet from 
the center line and running the full length of the boiler rooms. Transverse bulkheads, 
two abreast each fireroom, divide this space into bunkers 25 feet long and extend out 
to the shall. 

A similar arrangement of bulkheads between G and H decks is provided, except the 
longitudinal is 18 inches outboard of the uptake casings. 

Present pump rooms are retained. Weight of these and present main divisional 
bulkh^ids Tbetween firerooms is not included. 

Case V. — Flooding of No. 2 and No. 3 boiler rooms and the space outboard of same 
between longitudinal bulkhead and shall on one side: 



Condition A, no water i Condition B, witli 
ballast. water ballast. 



Increase in draft 6 feet 6 Incbes 6 feet 8 inches. 

Ne w draft 42 feet 4 inches ! 43 f eet M inches . 

G. M 1 Plus 0.6 foot 1 Plus 1.8 feet. 

Approximate heel ! 70"* l 40". 



NO. 56. FOSSIBLE DANGER OF FIRE FROM MIXED OtL AND WATER. 

The committee discussed the probable effect following a bilging accident whereby 
large quantities of sea water and fuel oil became mixed and flooded into firerooms, and 
it was the consensus of opinion that such a condition would tend to put out the fires 
under the boilers. 

NO. 67. ADDITIONAL EXISTING OIL STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE. 

The chairman announced that since the last meeting of the committee ballast tank 
marked on plan as No. 17 had been opened and was found to contain about 1,200 tons 
of pig-iron ballast. The effect of this discovery was to make immediately available 
displacement for carriage of 1,200 tons of oil not hitherto figured upon, and it was 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1587 

pointed out that if a new deep tank were constructed immediately forward of the 
bunker hold and of sufficient size to carr^ about 1,200 tons of fuel oil and 1,200 tons of 
ballast were thus done away with, the distribution of weight resulting would improve 
the trim of the ship. 

NO. 58. ENTRANCE OF MR. R. L. HAOUE. 

Mr. K. L. Hague, manager of Construction and Repair Division, United States 
Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, ex officio of this committee, entered 
the meeting at this pomt and was introduced to those present by the chairman. The 
latter reviewed for Mr. Hague's information the discussions of the committee up to this 
point. 

NO. 59. DECISION AQAIN8T CON8TRUGTINO SIDE TANKS. 

The committee discussed in detail the various factors and proposals heretofore con- 
sidered in connection with fitting side tanks having tl;e following general character- 
istics: 

(a) Continuous side tanks approximately occupying the spaces of the present side 
bunkers. 

(6) An inner skin having a width of 4 feet and fitted in accordance with the rules 
of the British Board of Trade. 

(c) Discontinuous side tanks with a width approximate the width of the present coal 
bunkers and divided by recesses extending from the skin of the ship to the boiler 
room. 

(d) Inner discontinuous tanks: The inner bulkhead being placed on the line of the 

g resent coal bimker bulkhead^ and a new outer bulkhead at a distance of about 5 feet 
om the skin of the ship, divided by recesses giving access from the skin of the ship 
to the bf>iler room. 

Considering the small amount of metacentric height possessed by this steamer, and 
the fact that with any of the proposed arrangements of side tanks a serious list is liable 
to develop when the ship is damaged, and considering further the great expense (esti- 
mated at 45 cents a pound or $1,008 a ton) and increase of structural weight necessarily 
involved in fitting any of the proposed arrangements of side tanks, it was unanimously 
decided not to fit any side tanks, but to depend on the use of the double bottom and 
other tanks forward of frame No. 173, and to install two new deep tanks, one in way of 
the present bunker hold, viz: Frames 234 to 245, and other deep tank from frames 245 
to 270, extending up to I deck or H deck, as necessary to gain the requisite capacity 
considering the trim of the ship. The balance of the capacity required will be made 
up of settling tanks installed in the fire rooms, and in such a position and of such shape 
as to eliminate the danger of accidental damage and resultmg listing from bilginff or 
ramming accidents. Aner a full discussion of the total desirable capacity for oil fuel 
considering the above factors, it was agreed unanimously bv the committee and con- 
curred in by Mr. Hague, that the capacity for oil fuel should be 9,000 tons, and that 
if it was desired to fuel the ship for a round voyage, the speed would be determined 
by this oil capacity, as it represents a maximum considering all of the foregoing factors. 
It is understood tnat the fresh water capacity , utilizing all tanks aft of frame 173, will 
be 3,800 tons, and this is deemed sufficient, as it e<^iials me original fresh water capacity 
of the steamer. Mr. Dobson will study the location, weights, and other particulars of 
the installation agreed upon, and submit report thereon to the committee at the next 
meeting. 

NO. 60. HEAVY GRAVITY FUEL OIL. 

The chairman informed the committee that no reports from Hamburg had been 
received, which would indicate difficulties encountered on the steamship Manchuria 
in the handling of 14® B. Mexican fuel oil. However, the cable communications 
with Germany are so bad at the present time that a complete report had not been 
obtained. It was agreed that no serious difficulties will probably be encountered 
in handling this grade of fuel oil in the double-bottom tanks on the Leviathan, espe- 
cially in view of the depth of the double-bottom tanks and their being fitted with 
1} square feet of steam heating surface per ton of oil. 

NO. 61. TEST OF OIL BURNERS. 

It having been ascrertained that it was impracticable for any member of Stevens 
Institute faculty to supervise competitive tests of oil burners, Sfr. Hague announced 
that the Emergencjr Fleet Corporation would assign Mr. Stevens for this purpose. 
Messrs. Peabody, Milne, and Schreiber, as a sulx^ommittee, were instructea to pro- 



1588 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

ceed at on<'e in conference with Mr. Stevens and draw up a set of specificatioDB for 
the conductinjj of these tests. 

NO. 63. BURNERS TO BE TESTED. 

The (*ommitt«e aofreed that the following makes of oil burpers should be t^ted, 
viz, Coen. Whit«, Peabody (Babco<'k & Wilcox), Dahl, and a type to be recommended 
by Mr. Metten, of Wm. (^rarap & Sons Ship & Engine Building Co. Mr. Peabody 
at this point stated that he had severed his connection with the Babock & Wilcox 
Boiler Co. for the purpose of devoting his sole time and attention to the develop- 
ment and use of his type of fuel-oil burner and upon his request, the cammittee 
agreed to permit him to submit his latest type of fuel oil burner for its consideration, 
with a view to possibly including it among the burners to be tested. In this con- 
nect i>n the committee a<?reed that no one should l>e given an opportunity to fit oil 
burning e<(uipment on this vessel, which in its nature is experimental or has not 
been proved out in extensive prac^tice, and it was further agreed that competition 
should be limited to six types of burners above mentioned. 

NO. 64. SPECIFICATIONS FOR OIL-KUEL EQUIPMENT. 

It was a.'^reed that the preparation of specificatiuns would proceed at once, Ifr. 
Dobson handling specifications for structural changes necessary and Messrs, Nichols 
and Milne to speciiy pumps, piping, heaters, etc. In this connection it wbb agreed 
that a representative of tJie Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. snould 
remain continuously on this work until it had been disposed of, presenting a draft 
of the specifications at the next meeting if possible. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

At 11.45 a. m. the committee adjourned, to meet again at 9.30 a. m., Januar>' 
23, 1920. 

Division of Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, January 16, ISItO. 

Memorandum for Mr. G. W. Sterling, assistant director of operations. 
Attention of Mr. Lewis G. Foster, manager, Vessel Delivery Department. 
Inventory, steamship Leviathan. 

Maj. Gushing has referred to me for decision the matter of inventory on the Leviathan^ 
as per his telegram of January 15, No. 1426, reading as follows: 

* 'Attention Foster. Your letter, 16047, January 14. Consult Hague and be guided 
by his instructions. Telegraph what you do." 

After a careful analvsis of the situation, I have decided that I will make the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine responsible for the inventory and will accept this for the 
shipping Board if same is approved by Mr. W. F. Gibbs, chief constructor of the 
international Mercantile Marine. Consequently, to-morrow evening you w^U with- 
draw your checkers from the Leviathan, turning over what work you have done to 
date to the inventory representative of the International Mercantile Marine. 

The International Mercantile Marine pays $6 per day for checkers, not $7, as stated 
in your letter of January 14 to Maj. Cusning. 

I will be glad to discuss with Maj. Gushing the pay of your checkers when I return 
to Washington next Monday. Please furnish me with the necessary data. 

R. L. Hagub, 
Manager Construction and Repaxr DepartmerU, 

Copy to Mr. W. F. Gibl)s, International Mercantile Marine. 



January 15, 1920. 

Memorandum for Passenger Ship Section, Department Construction and Repair. 
Attention of Mr. J. W. Linck. 

In reply to your memorandum of Januar}"^ 15, in re the 18-ton anchor for the steam- 
ship Leviathan, there are attached copies of letters to Mr. J. P. Good, Mr. McC^rren 
of tne fleet siipply basin, and Mr. William F. Gibbs, of the International Mercantile 
"'■^rine Co. Copies of all this correspondence were furnished to Mr. Gibbs and Mr. 
bs. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1589 

For 3rour information, this anchor was forwarded to the veasel on January 10 and is 
now on Army Pier No. 4, Hoboken, at the side of the ship. 

G. S. Earn BH AW, 

Senior Clerk. 



[Official telegram, United States Shipping Board.] 

Wabhinoton, D. C, January 15, 19i0. 
To Assistant D. of O. New York. 

Attention Foster. Your letter sixteen naught forty seven January foiuteenth. 
Consult Hague and be guided by his instructions. Telegraph what you do. 

CUSHINO. 



Januaky 15, 1920. 

Memorandum for Mr. T. J. Miggins, assistant comptroller, New York City. 
Attention Mr. II. P. Gillelen. jr. 

It is our interpretation of the contract dated December 17, 1919, between the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine ('o. and the United States Shippini? Board coverini; the 
reconditioning of the steamer Leriathrn. a copy of which was lodged with your office, 
that the United states Shipping Board is to assume only the responsibility of approv- 
ing purchases by the International Mercantile Marine Co. for account of the owner for 
amounts $5,000 or over and on all contracts. 

It is our desire that this office or any other departments of the Shipping Board shall 
not be burdened with detailed matters in connecti<m with this reconditioning. The 
burden of s-ich detail should be thrown on the Intern iti mH Mercantile Marine ('o. 

In accordance with this policy, you yn\\ kindly make arrangements with Mr. Gibbs, 
chief of construction of the Internaticmal Mercantile Marine (-o., for his organization to 
assume the responsibility of paying off the crew of the above-mentioned veasel and the 
filling of all requisitions. The Shipping Board's part in the matter will simply be 
that of a check on expenditures and honoring the re juisitions for expenditures when 
the final accounting is rendered by the International Mercantile Marine Co. for money 
expended for the account of the reconditioning of this vessel. 

G. S. Earnshaw, Senior Clerk. 
Copies to Mr. Gibbs, Mr. Jacob, Mr. Hague, and Mr. Gill . 



January 15, 1020. 
Memorandum for Mr. W. J. Love, purchasing agent. 

It is our interpretation of the contract dated December 17, between the Interna- 
tional Mercantile Marine Co. and the United Statas Shipping Board that the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine Co. is to assume all responsibility in connection with pur- 
chases and requisitions account of the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan. 

The position r>f the Shipping Board is simply that of a check on the expenditures of 
the International Mercantile Marine (-f>. acting as agents on our behalf for the recon- 
ditioning of the vessel. 

You will therefore kindly be governed by the policy outlined above and in the 
future refrain from filling any requisitions of any nature in connection with the 
recondition of this vessel. 

R. L. Hague, 
Manager Department Construction and Repair. 

Copies to Mr. Hague, Mr. Jacobs, Mr. McCann, and Mr. Gillelen. 



Mr. William P. Gibbs, 

Chief of Construction, International Mercantile Marine Co., New York City. 

Dear Mr. Gibbs: There are inclosed copies of letters addressed to Mr. Love, pur- 
chasing agent, and Mr. Miggins, assistant comptroller of the New York district, relative 
to our mterpretation of the terms of the contract for the reconditioning of the steamship 
Lemthan. 
Will you kindly be governed by the inclosed. 
Yours, very truly, 

G. S. Earnshaw, Senior Clerk. 



1590 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

January 15, 1920. 
International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New Yorl City. 

Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs, chief of construction. 

Gentlemen: Jn reply to your letter of January 14, relative to the contmct for 
telephone service on tne steaniBhip Leviathanjthe writer stopped in the office yesterday 
afternoon, January 14, and talked to Mr. F. H. Gibbs, stating that I had just received 
an opinion fro Mr. Conrad, Admiralty Counsel for the United States Shipping Board, 
custom house, that his interpretation of the contract for reconditionii^ was that you 
were given leeway in purchases up to and including $5,000, but that any contracts 
involving any sum whatsoever must bear the approval of someone on the Shipping 
Board. 

There is inclosed for your information copy of a telegram received from Mr. Hagae, 
Washington, authorizing me to authorize your company to execute contract for tele- 
phone service. 

At the present moment I am still acting under the authority of Maj. ("ushing, idiich 

fave me tne right to approve contracts and purchases with the O. K. of Mr. Jacob of the 
^assenger Ship Section of the Construction and Repair Department, made on behalf 
of your company acting as agent for the Shipping Board in the rehabilitation of the 
steamship Leviathan. As yet I received no notification that this authorization was 
cancelled. 

Upon receipt of such information from either Mr. Hague or Mr. Cushing, I shall be 
glad to turn over this power to anyone whom they may designate to act in tne future on 
behalf of the Shipping Board. 
Yours, very truly, 

G. S. Earnshaw, Senior Clerk. 



January 15, 1919. 
Memorandum for Mr. G. S. Earnshaw, steamship Leviathan. 

It will be in order for Mr. Jacob to approve pay rolls for the Leviathan when in excess 
of 15,000 after same have been passed upon by Capt. Ryan of the Passenger Ship 
Section. 

The matter of feeding of crew is one that should be left entirely in the hands of the 
International Mercantile Marine Co. 



Manager J Construction and Repair Department. 
Copies to Mr. Jacob and ("apt. Ryan. 



January 15, 1920. 
Mr. William F. Gibbs, 
Chief of Construction J 

International }fercantile Marine Co., 

New York City. 

Dear Mr. Gibbs: There are inclosed copies of letters addressed to Mr. Love, pur- 
chasing agent, and Mr. Miggins, assistant comptroller of the New York district, rolativc 
to our interpretation of the terms of the contract for the reconditioning of the steamship 
Leviathan. 
Will you kindly be governed by the inclosed? 
Yours, very truly, 

G. S. Earnshaw, Senior Clerk. 



January 15, 1920. 
Memorandum for Mr. Earnshaw. 
Steamship Leviathan. 

Herewith copy of self-explanatory memorandum from Mr. George Lytle. 

Kindly advise at your earliest convenience what action you are taking in this matter. 

R. L. Hague, 
Passenger Ship Section Construction and Repair Department, 



SHIPPING BOABD OFBRATIONS. 1591 

. Division op Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New Yorhy Jamuxry 14, 19 ?0. 
Attention of Maj. J. E. Cushinj?, director of operations. 
Subject: Inventory of steamship Lemaihan. 

Washington, 

Division of Operations. 

First I wish to jfive you the history of the delivery of this steamer: 

Capt. Dreiman came up from Washington, advising us he had received instructions 
from you to deliver the steamship Le^'iaihan to the International Mercantile Marine 
Co. under special agreement, which had been drawn up in Washington, and the 
steamer was duly delivered at 12 midnight on December 22, 1919, on written advice 
from Capt. Drennan to the International Mercantile Marine. * 

At the time the writer took up tJie matter of inventories with Capt. Drennan, he 
advised that he was making arrangements to have some outside interests take the 
inventories of this steamer, as he was very particular; therefore, the writer left the 
entire matter in the hands of Capt. Drennan and Mr. Eamshaw. 

About three weeks later, I received a telephone advice from your department, 
Washington, r^arding taking inventories of this steamer. The writer immediately 
got in communication with the International Mercantile Marine Co., and they advised 
that they were unable to secure men to check inventories and we therefore agreed to 
furnish them Shipping Board inventory clerks to check for them, we giving these men 
leave of absence for the time they were employed by the International Mercantile 
Marine. 

The rate of pay of our inventory clerks is $125 per month, and when our men re- 
ported to the International Mercantile Marine for duty they found that they had 
nired some additional outside men, most of whom were known to our inventory men, 
as they had worked for the Army and Shipping Board before. The ability of these 
men was of inferior quality, but they were receiving $7 per day, therefore our men 
became very dissatisfied arid requested to be put on some other Shipping Board ship. 

We received authority in telegram dated December 24, No. 38424, signed by Mr. 
Heerbrandt, to put on any necessary men to inventory the Leviathan^ at not exceeding 
15 per day wage. W^e have found it impoe^ble to secure men to do this work f pr $5 
per dsLy. It has now come to the point where the International Xiercantile Marine 
IS pressing us to put on more men, which we are unable to do. 

The only solution, it would seem, is that we be given authority to put on men for 
checking thie steamer at $7 per day to meet the figure of the International Mercantile 
Marine, but if this is done you can understand that we will probably not have any 
men left in our employ to take inventories on other ships. 

I would advise that the Army is paying their inventory clerks $6 per day and $1.25 
for overtime. The Navy men recei-sre $5.36 per day, plus $2 subsistence, whereas 
our men receive $125 per month. 

As you can readily see, the Shipping Board inventory clerks are the poorest paid 
on the water front. 

I would further state that the men that we now have are as good inventory clerks 
as there are in New York, and all, or mostly all, have had extensive exponence in 
inventorying steamers coming from the Army and Navy and being redelivered to 
owners. 

Therefore, the only real solution of the matter, as far as we can see, is to raise the 
ealaries of the permanent inventory staff and give us authority to put on, temporarily, 
the necessary men at $7 per day to cover the Leriathan. 

I understand that Mr. Jett, of the Construction and Repair Department, is very 
anxious to have the inventory of this steamer completed, so that they can store all 
the material now on board while the steamer is being reconditioned . 

We would thank you to advise, at the earliest possible moment, what action you 
"wiah us to take, as you are no doubt aware it is urgent. 

Division of Operations, 
Lewis G. Foster, 
"^^ mager Vessels Delivery Department. 



1592 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Construction and Repair Dbpartmbnt, 

January 14t ^^^• 
Mr. William Francis Gibbb, 

International Mercantile Marine^ 

New York City. 
Steamship Leviathan, 

Mt Dear Mr. Gibbs: In response to your communication of January 12 this 
will confirm understanding that we are in accord with the instructions you have g^ven 
your consulting architects to go forward with the fitting up of a sample first-clsfls 
stateroom on the Leviathan for guidance in the preparation of specifications. 
Very truly, yours, 

» 
Manager Constrridion and Repair Department. 



United States Shipping Board, 

Washington^ January 14, 1920. 
Steamship Leviathan. 
Attention of Mr. P. S. S. Franklin, president. 

International Mercantile Marine Corporation, 

New York City. 

Gentlemen: In accordance with clause U-B, reconditioning agreement dated 
December 17. 1919, I designate Mr. R. L. Hague as our representative, effective as of 
the date of the agreement. 
Verv trulv, yours. 

John Barton Payne, Chairman. 



January 14, 1920. 
Attention of Earnshaw. 

Sterling, 

Shipping Board, New York, 

You may authorize I. M. M. to execute contract covering Leviathan tie line, now 
45 -Roadway, to I. M. M. office, and in addition arrange for once city trunk line. 

Hague. 



January 13, 1920. 
Attention of Mr. W. F. Dunning, 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

Washington, 

Division of Operations. 

Confirming telephone conversation, I have to-day obtained Capt. Ryan's O. K. 01 
the pay roll of the steamship Leviathan for the week ending to-dav, amounting to 
$5,362.70. The large amount of the pay roll is due to the fact that feeding was 
stopped on board the vessel on January 10, and the cost of supplying subsistence to 
the crew amounted to $930. 

It is my feeling that the present arrangement of Mr. McCann's, paying off the crew 
for the steamship Leviathan on the O. K. of Mr. Marshall, of the International Mer- 
cantile Marine, up to $5,000, and the necessity of someone else O. King it from $5,000 
up, is most unsatisfactory and that this system should be changed so that the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine C^. pays off these men direct, billing us for the amount 
of the pay roll. 

Would you be kind enough to take this matter up with Mr. Hague, so that you 
will be atlo to talk to Mr. McCann when vou come back to New York? 

The other day I received a letter from Mr. Gibbs notifying us tJbat on January 10 
the feeding of the crew of the steamship Leviathan on board ship would cease. Up 
to the present time I have received no figures and can not determine whether this is 
the most economical procedure or not. 

Inclosed is a slight summary which I have obtained from the commissary depart- 
ment here in New York, which shows the average cost of feeding per week and the 
average cost of not feeding. According to these figures, it would appear to be more 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1593 

economical to feed, and have therefore requested Mr. Marshall to furnish me with 
some figures upon which he has hased his conclusion not to feed. 

G. S. Earnshaw, Senior Clerk. 

Per week, feeding: 

Consumable stores $\, 436. 3() 

Coal 30.45 

Laundr>' '. 75. 16 

Ice 9.80 

$1,550.77 

Overtime, mess at tendants, and galley 516. 00 

Total 2,066.77 

Not feeding: • 

Subsistence and board, 2 (master and first officer), at $5 

per day 70.00 

11 petty officers, at $4.50 per day 49. 50 

207 men, at $2 per day 414. 00 

Total per day 4 73. 50 

Total fori week (7 days) 3,314.50 

Leas cost of feeding (7 days) 2, 066. 77 

Loss per week by not feeding 1, 247. 73 

Loes per month (4 weeks) 4, 990. 92 



January 13, 1920. 
Mr. A. D. Walters, 

Special Agent f New York Telephone Co., New York City, N. Y. 
Attention Mr. C. B. Downs. 

Dear Sir: In accordance with telephone instructions from Washington, you are 
hereby authorized to cancel the present contract for telephones on tne steamship 
LeviaSumj which includes a tie line from our office. Exchange, Whitehall 1060. to the 
vessel; a subswitchboard and 14 extensions now installed, to enter into a new con- 
tract with the International Mercantile Marine Co. covering the installation of: 

Trunk line from the Hoboken exchange to the vessel, cost per annum $24. 00 

Cost of installation of trunk line 3. 50 

Thirty-line subswitchboard in telephone room of the ship at a cost of, per 

annum > 24. 00 

Fourteen extension stations on the steamship Leviathan in connection with 

the subswitchboard : cost of first 10 extensions at $6, total per annum 60. 00 

Four extensions at $4.80 per annum 19. 20 

Four woiidng station drops at $1.20 per annum 4. 80 

Transfer the present tie line from this office to the switchboard of the I. M. M. 
Co., 11 Broadway, exchange. Bowling Green 8300, and the vessel, at the 
present rate (it is underetood that the trunk-line calls will be on a basis of 
6,000); cost : 160. 00 

Total 295.00 

It is imdeistood that the service connection charge for the 14 extensions will be $49 
and the installation charge for this subswitchboard and extensions will not be greater 
than $200. 

There is indoeed copy of a letter from the director of operations, Washington, which 
states that all requiaitioiis for work, etc., in connection with the agency contract for 
the reoonditioiiing of the steamship Leviathan by the International Mercantile Marine 
Go. must bear the approval of G. S. Earnshaw and the 0. K. of the Ship Passenger 
Section in the Construction and Repair Department. 

Will you kindly be governed by the above. 
I ouiB, very truly, 

Ida Nblson, Chief Opffutor, 

Copies to Mrs. Ida Nelson, Mr. W. F. Dunning, Mr. Robert Jacob, Mr. T. J. Miggins, 
Mr. G. W. Sterling, Mr. George J. Remington, and Mr. W. F. Gibbs. 

177068— 20— PT 4 23 



1594 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

■ 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office Chief of Construction, 

New York, January 10^ 19i0. 
Division of Operations, 

United States Shipping Boards E. F. C, New York City. 
Attention Mr. Eamslmw. 

Dear Sirs: Will you please arrange for the installation of a private trunk line, 
connecting our private branch exchange (Bowling Green 8300) with the private branch 
exchange recently installed on the steamship Lieviathan. We understand that the 
latter exchange has capacity for five trunk lines, and that only one trunk line is now 
connected from your office thereto. 

This request is necessitated by the large volume of telephone traffic necessary in 
connection with the work of the deck, engine and steward departments, the work m 
connection with directing and coordinating the foregoing. 

As at present arranged, the single trunk line from your office to the vessel is entirely 
inade<|uate, there being many times when it is impossible for us to reach the veaael 
and vice versa. Beyond this there have been occasions of emergencies at nizht 
when there was no telephone service operating from the ship, especially whenfire 
was threatened, and we therefore request that a third trunk-line connection be run 
between the vessel's private exchange and the Hoboken Central Exchange. 

It Would be appreciated if this matter received your prompt attention, as it is 
deemed of importance for the safety of the vessel . 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By William Francis Gibbs, (ihi^J of Construction. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York, January 10, 19i0. 
Hon. John Barton Payne, 

Chairman United States Shipping Boards 

Washington, D. C. 

Dear Judge Payne: Your favor of the 9th instant received, asking my sugges- 
tions regarding the contents oi cable given therein from Messis. Bloom <fe Voss offering 
iheir seridces in connection with the rehabilitation of the Leviathan. 

Our experience has clearly demonstrated that for extensive repairs or renewals the 
builder of the steamer is far better than anybody else. Therefore I unhesitatingly 
state that Messrs. Bloom & Voss should, wi&out doubt, be able to rehabilitate Sie 
Lei-iathan in shorter time and at much less expense and as efficient as any other ship- 
builder or repairer hero or elsewhere, particularly as they have all the plans, specifica- 
tions, and complete knowledge of the steamer. 

Notwithstanding the above, I think the experience and knowledge that the rehabil- 
itating of this steamer in this country will ^ve to our shipbuilders, ship outfitters, and 
decorators will be invahiable to them, which should be weighed as against the econ- 
omies in time and cost by sending the steamer abroad. 

The risks of fire and other damage in connection with the work on this steamer are 
so great that my recommendation is that if you should decide to send her to Germany 
for repairs, that you will make it a condition that you will not pay for the work until 
the steamer is cleli\ered to you at a port in the English Channel, completely finished 
and outfitted for immediate commission. 
Yours, very truly, 

P. A. S. Franklin. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief op Construction, 

New York, Janxwry 5, 19:t0. 

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

New York City. 
Attention Messrs. Eamshaw & Link. 
Subject: Messing and sleeping aboard steamship Leviathan. 

^ Dear Sirs: In view of the necessity for paying overtime and the general ineffi- 
ciency resulting from the crew messing and sleeping aboard the ship, we are terminat- 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1595 

ing this arrangement as of 3 p. m. January 10. Thereafter the usual Shipping Board 
allowance for meBalng and room accommodation will be given the crew. 

We have made a caret il investigation of this matter, and we are convinced that the 
crew's messing and sleeping on board leads to inefficiency and waste, hence our step 
in the premises. 

Very tnily, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine, 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation^ 
By William F. Gibbs, Chief of Construction, 

Copies to Maj. Gushing, Mr. Sterling, Mr. Hague, Mr. Jacob, Mr. Miggins, Mr. Love. 



January 2, 192U. 
Mr. William F. Gibbs, 

Ckifif of Construction y I. M. M. Co., New York City, 

Dear Mr. Gibbs: I have for acknowledgement your letter of December 30 request- 
ing us to approve the appointment of Messrs. Walker and Gillette to work on the plans 
and specifications of interior decorations of the steamship Leviatlian. 

Please be ad\Tsed that this letter will constitute your authority for employing Messrs. 
Walker & Gillette under the terms of your letter to them under date of December 
22, 1919, in which you statt^ that as agents for the United States Shipping Board 
Emereency Fleet Corporation you will pay them the actual out-of pocket expenses 
that tney are put to in connection with the work, and that they are to bill you monthly 
as the work continues; and it is further understood that if the rehabilitation work is 
done in accordance with the plans and specifications prepared by thfe architects, 
the fee to them covering the profit and compensation of their members in connection 
with their work will be actually agreed upon at a later date: and if you decide that at 
any time the cost of the preparing of the plans and specifications by the said firm of 
ardiitects is excessive, it is understood that your company will stop work and that the 
Shipping Board will be under no further obligation to pay out-of-pocket expenses 
from that date. 

Yours very truly, 

G. S. Earn SHAW. 

Senior Chrk. 
R. L. Hague, 
By J. N. LiNCK, 
Department Construction and Repair. 

Copies to Maj. C. E. Gushing ^Iklr. T. J. Miggins, Mr. F. M. Bynum, Mr. Robert 
Jacob, Mr. L. G. Foster, Mr. G. H. Jett, and Mr. W. F. Dunning. 



December 30, 1919. 
Mr. G. S. Earnshaw, 

Division of Operations y United States Shipping Boards E. F. C, New York City. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

Dear Mr. Earnshaw: In connection with the preparation of plans and specifica- 
tions and later the supervision of work on the above vessel, we consider it would be 
neceflsary and very advantageous to employ a firm of competent architects to deal 
with the interior decorations, furnishings, draperies, color scheme, etc. To this end 
we have made to Messrs. Walker & Gillette a proposition as per inclosed copy of our 
letter of December 22. 
We inclose a cop^ of their acceptance under date of Deceml)er 30. 
It will be appreciated if you will promptly approve this agreement and advise us 
accordingly. 

Messrs. Walker & Gillette have had a very considerable experience in interior 
decorative work of the highest class; we believe they are fully competent to deal 
satisfactorily with the situation we have in hand. 
Very truly yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Agents for the Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By Willlan Francis Gibbs, 
9 Chief of Construction. 



1596 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York, December 29, im, 
Mr. C. S. Earnshaw. 

Senior CUrk, DivUion of Operations, 

United StaUs Ship /ring Board, E. F. C, 
Neil) York City. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, 

Dear Mr. Earnshaw: Your letter of December 26, inclosing copy of memorandum 
from Capt. Drennan to Mr. Miggins on the subject of stewards* overtime has been 
received and we note therefrom mat you have been paying overtime for the steward 
department prior to December 17. 

We now have under consideration the most economical and efficient method of 
dealing with this situation, and we will be in a position shortly to advise you as to 
whether we recommend continuing the feeding of the crew on the ship or not. 
Very truly, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 
Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By William Francis Gibbs, 

Chief of Construction. 

Copies to: Capt. Drennan, Mr. R. H. Gregory, Mr. Robert Jacob. 



December 28, 19ia. 

(Memorandum for Mr. W. H. Moore, superintendent of guards.) 
I have received from Mr. Gibbs^ chief of construction, I. M. M. Co., notification 
that they will take over the guarding of the steamship Leviathan by their own men 
at 8 a. m., Tuesday, December 30. You will therefore be relieved from responsibility 
of guarding the vessel as of this hour and date. 

C. S. Earnshaw, Senior CUrk. 

Copies to Mr. T. J. Miggins, Mr. Geo. J. Remington, Mr. L. G. Foster, Mr. Robert 
JacoD. 



Division op Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emeroency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, December 2S, 1919. 
International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York City, N. Y. 

(Attention Mr. Wm. F. Gibbs, chief of construction.) 

Gentlemen: Please be advised that, effective this date, the United Shipping 
Bouxi hereby turns over to the International Mercantile Marine Co. the steamship 
Lemathan, in accordance with the terms of the contract between the two companies 
dated December 17, 1919. 

In accordance with the terms of the contract mentioned above, you are authorized 
to take over, as of this date, the management of the crew and watchmen. 

You will further kindly arrange at once with Mr. Foster^ manager of the redeliver)* 
department, to take a joint inventory of the stores and equipment of the above-named 
vessel at the earliest possible moment. 
Yours, very truly, 

Rtland Drennan, 

Deck Department. 

Copies to Maj. J. E. Cushing, Mr. R. L. Hague, Mr. W. F. Dunning, Mr. R. Jacob, 
Mr. T. Miggins, Mr. L. G. Foster, Mr. F. M. Bjnum. 



December 23, 1919. 
International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York City. 

(Attention Mr. P. A.' A. Franklin, steamship Leviathan.) 

Dear Sir: In accordance with the terms of the contract signed between the Int-er- 
national Mercantile Marine Co. and the United States Shipping Board, please be 
advised that the United States Shipping Board will turn over to the Inteaiational 
Mercantile Marine Co. the steamship Leviathan for management and operation, and 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1597 

the International Mercantile Marine Co. will hereafter be in charj;e of crew and 
property as outlined in the contract, effective this date. 
\ ours, very truly, 

R. L. Hague, 

By , 

Canstniction and Repair Department. 



Division of Operations, 
United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, December 2S, 1919, 
Mr. Wif. H. Moore, 

Superinterufent of Guards United States Shipping Boards 

Customhouse, A>i/' Y'ork City. 
Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

There is attached letter of authority to the International Mercantile Marine Co. 
to take over the steamship Leviathan under contract ^ith the Shipping Board dated 
December 17, 1919. Under the terms of the contract the I. M. M. Co. are to take over 
the management of the crew and the watchmen. 

It is the desire of the I. M. M. (^o. to leave our guards on the host for a few days 
until they can make arrangements for their own guard system. This i» ill be perfectly 
s,%tisfactor\' to us. 

I am to day writing to Mr. Gibbs of the I. M. M. Co. that it is perfectly agreeable 
to have oiu^ guards remain, although the burden of expense from this day on must 
be borne by their company. 

G. S. Earnshaw, 

Senior Clerk. 

(^opies to Capt. R. Drennan and Mr. F. Bynum. 



December 22, 1910. 
Messrs. Walker & Gillette, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs: Referring to your letter of December 19, the work of reconditioning 
tho steam^ip Leviathan is being undertaken by this company as agents for the United 
Stat<3e Shipping Board and under these circumstances we desire to have the approval 
of the board to any arrangement we may make with you in connection with this 
steamer. 

There are points contained in your letter which we do not feel we can recommend 
to the Shipping Board, and in view of this we suggest in place of the basis proposed 
in your letter, the following: 

To aid the committee having in charge the general subject of the rehabilitation 
specifications, we will be glad to have you undertake the preparation of plans and 
specifications for the redecoration and reifurnishintr of such of the passenger accommo- 
dations of the steamship Tjeinathan as we may indicate and subjec't to our approval 

As agents for the Umted States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, we 
will pay the actual out-of-pocket expenses you are put to in connection with this 
work which you will bill to us monthly as your work continues. It is further under- 
stood that if the rehabilitation work is done in accordance with plans and specifica- 
tions prepared by you, the fee to your firm covering the profit and compensation of 
its members in connection with this w^ork will be mutually agreed upon at a later 
date. If, however, we decided at any time that the cost of preparing the plans and 
specifications hereunder is excessive, it is understood that you will stop work at our 
request, and the Shipping Board shall be under no further obligation to you except 
the pay out-of-pocket expenses to date. 

We understand t^at you contemplate putting an organization in charge of this wo k 
which will be separate from the or^nization m charge of your regular architectural 
practice, but which will be equal in skill to your r^ilar organization and that the 
members of your firm will give their personal attention to this work. If your plans 
and speciQcations are satisfa^^tory to the Shipping Board and to us, it is the intention 
to have you supervise the execution of the work under our direction. 

If the above meets with your approval, kindly advise us prompt'y when we will 
plare the arrangement before the Snipping Board for their approval. 
Very tnily, yours, 

International Mercantile Marine Co.. 

Agents for Emergency Fleet Corporation. 
By William FRANns (iibbs, 

rV/ iff of ( Construction . 



1598 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

DivrsioN OF Operations, 
United States Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York, December tO, 1919. 

(Memorandum for Mr. (J. H. Jett, Mr. Robert Jacob, Mr. L. G. Foster, Mr. T. J. 
Mij^ns.) 

There is attached herewith copy of a contract between the International Mercantile 
Marine Co. and the United States Shippino: Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
for the purpose of preparing plans and specifications for the reconstniction, prepar- 
ing, and outfitting of the steamship Letiathan. 

Your attention is called to paragraph C, where it states: 

''All contracts shall be in the name of the owner, and all purchases of the amount 
of 15,000 or over and all contracts shall be subject to the approval of the own^/* 

G. S. Earnshaw, 

Senior Clerk. 



December 18. 1019. 
Mr. William Francis Gibbh, 

International .\ferchantile \farine. 

New York City. 

My Dear Mr. Gibbs: This will acknowledge yoiu" communication of December 
15, inclosing copy of minutes of meeting of the Leviathan committee, together with 
preliminary plans prepared bv your company. 
I appreciate very mucn your !urni?hing tfiis information. 
Very truly, yours. 

.\8.m8TANT TO MANAGER CONSTRUCTION AND RePAIR DepT. 



No. 14187. 

December 18, 1920. 
Washington Division of Operations: 
Attention of Mr. W. F. Dunning. 

In confirmation of our telephone conversation this morning it is my understanding 
that it is Maj. Cushing*H desire to have me confer with the International Mercantile 
Marine in matters regarding the S. S. Leviathan during Mr. Sterling's absence. 

Farther, that I am, in case of importance or where there is any doubt arising in 
my mind as to the proper action to pursue, to call you on the phone and receive your 
authorization for any negotiations before the same is actually entered into, con- 
firming conversation* and your reply by letter. 

G. S. Earnshaw, 

Senior Clerk. 



December 17, 1919. 
International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York City. 
Attention of Mr. W. F. Gibbs, S. S. Leviathan. 

Gentlemen : We inclose herewith for possible consideration in connection with the 
specifications of the S. S. Leviathan description pamphlet of the Sloan Valve Co. 
Yours. \ ery truly, 

R. L. Hague. 
By Passenger Ship Section. 
Construction and Repair Department. 



(At this point in the file appears copy of contract between the International Mer- 
cantile Marine Co. and the United States Shipping Board, which contract has been 
copied heretofore and marked "Exhibit C.** 

December 16, 1919. 
Memorandum No. 283. 
United Stat-es Shipping Board, U. S. S. Leviathan. 

We jointly submit to the board final draft of contract with the International ?ier- 
cantile Co. covering the reconstniction of the U. S. S. Leviathan and recommend 
that this contract be executed. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1599 

The compensation of $15,000 per month has been carefully considered by the 
undersignea in conference with the officials of the International Mercantile ?.f arine 
Co. and we recommend it as fair. In tin? connection it is tentatively agreed that a 
figure of $5,000 each per month be recommended for the reconditioning of the V. S. S. 
Mount Vernon and IJ. S. S. Agawemnon. 

The contract in its present form haa been submitted to our legal division, the comp- 
troller and the treasurer, and is satisfactory to them. 

J. Vj. CiHinxo. 
Director of Operations. 
R. L. TIaoie, 
In charge of Passenger Ship Program. 



December 16, 1919. 
Mr. G. W. Sterlixcj, 

Shipping Board, Netv York. 

Steamship Leviathan. 

My Dear Mr. STERLiNCr: Mr. Gibbs, who represents the International Mercantile 
Marine on the Leviathan, aiid myself have talked over question of crew. We have 
agreed that as soon as the conditions of the agreement, whereby the International 
Mercantile Marine acts as our agent on this job have been consummated they take 
over the responsibility of the crew and the watchmen. 

Please arrange ^ith Mr. Gibbs some way in which International Mercantile Marine 
paaeea for access to this vessel will be recognized. 
Very truly, yours, 

R. L. Hague. 

Copies to Mr. W. F. Gibbs. 

EXTRACTS FROM MINUTES OF CONFERENCE HELD DECEMBER 16, 1919. 

Mr. ITague reported, relative to the plans for the interior decorations for the 536 and 
502 passenger ships under construction, that there would be no change in the general 
work planned and that it was proposed to have different color schemes for interior 
decorations; that with respect to the specifications of the larger passenger ships, such 
as the Leiniuhan, he stated he expected to have the si)ecification8 completed about 
the middle of January. 

International Mercantile Marine (^o., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

Neiv York, December 75, 1910. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager ^ Bureau of Construction and Repair, 
tlnited States Shipping Board, 

Emergency Fleet Corporation, Washington, D. C. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan committee. 

Dear Mr. Hague:- In accordance with your request, we hand you herewith, 
minutes of the meeting of shipbuilders, held at our office December 3, 1919. 
Very truly, yours, 

William Francis Gibbs, 

Chief of Construction. 

I 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office of the Chief of Construction, 

New York, December 15, 1919. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Bureau of Construction and Repair, 
Ignited States Shipping Board, 

Emergency Fleet Corporation, New York City, A'. Y. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan. 

Dear Mr. Hague: We are informed that there is a quantity of permanent ballast 
placed over the openings to tank No. 17, and there is no certainty as to the amount of 
permanent ballast which has been placed in tank No. 17. 

Under these circumstances we recommend that suflficient ballast over tank No. 17 
be removed to enable the tank to be entered and the amount of ballast therein to be 



1600 



SHIPPII!76 BOABD OFBBATIOHS. 



(letennined. This is most necessary in working up to the inclining experiment and 
it will be appreciated if you will issue the necessary orders. 
Very truly, yourp, 

William Fbancis Gibbs, 

Chuf of Construehon. 

Intervational Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office op the (^hibf of Construction. 

New York, December 15, 1919. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Bureau of Construction and Repair, 
United States Ship-ping Board, 
EmergeTicy Fleet Corporation, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Subject: Leviathan inclining experiment. 

Dear Mr. Hague: The hatch covers, fore and aft, having been removed when the 
track to carry the inclining weights was placed in position, we suggest that you direct 
the W. & A, Fletcher Co. to place temporary covers in place without disturbing tracks, 
so water pipes in these holds will not freeze. 
Very truly, yours, 

William Francis Gibbs, 

Chief of Con»trw±ifin. 

December 13, 1919. 
Mr. H. C. Sadler, 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Ex-German Vessels. 
Dear Mr. Sadler: I am forwarding herewith list of vessels giving dimensions of 
same upon which it is our deedre that you perform stability tests: 



Present name. 



Aflolii« 

Agaroemnon 

America 

Antigone 

DeKalb 

Ceorxe Wa.shlngton . 

Huron , 

Madawaska , 

Mount Vernon 

Martha Washington. 

Pocahontas , 

Powhatun 

Princess Matoika 

President Gmnt 

Von Steuben 



I/«ngth. 


Beam. 


Depth. 


D.ET. 


Gross. 


Net. 


Dmft. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 






Ft. in. 


580 10 


62 3 


35 9 


12,350 


13.102 


7.881 


27 1 


706 fi 


72 3 


40 2 


8,700 


19,320 


6.353 


29 10 


A69 


74 3 


47 8 


20.765 


22.621 


13.637 


39 5 


M8 1 


58 1 


37 


11.000 


9,835 


6.200 


26 


d06 A 


55 


32 1 


.8.200 


8.797 


4,812 


26 


722 5 


7K 2 


50 1 


15.300 


25.579 


15,378 


33 


54o 6 


60 I 


34 8 


11, OW 


10.771 


6,685 


28 


4go 4 


55 3 


31 2 


6,850 


9,459 


.5.764 


27 


706 6 


72 2 


40 5i 


8,300 


25,070 


19,760 


31 6 


400 


56 


24 


8.312 


8.145 


5,379 


24 9 


.')64 


60 2 


34 7 


10,550 


10,892 


6,443 


26 


499 3 


60 2 


34 7 


9.510 


10,531 


6,420 


29 9 


523 5 


60 I 


34 7 


10.500 


10.492 


6,088 


29 61 


:m 


68 2 


48 3 


19,810 


18.072 


11.112 


38 4 


663 

• 


66 


39 3 


6.900 


14.1108 


5.162 


30 fl 



Kindly submit at your earliest convenience your price per vessel for doing this work. 
Very truly, yours. 

Manager, 

Construction and Repirir Department. 



December 13, 1919. 

Meniorandum for Mr. Geo. W. Sterling, assistant director of operations. 
Subject: Property on steamship Leviathan June, 1917. 

In compliance with instnictions received from Mr. R. L. Hague about same property 
his attention was called to, taken from the steamship Leviathan in June. 1917, oririor, 
and put in the storehouse of the Manhattan Storage & Warehouse Co. either on Forty- 
second and Fourth Avenue or at Fifty-second Street and Seventh Avenue. 

Recalling that a friend of mine. Inspector Manley, of the customs service, who 
during the war was stationed at the Hoboken piers, Hoboken, N. J.. I located him 
to-day at Pier 6, Hoboken, on the phone and he informed me that there was an in- 
spector named Percy Reynolds detail e<l on the said ship and a Mr. Judson, of the 
Hotel Biltmore. 



SHIPPIlffG BOARD OPERATIONS. 1601 

Mr. Manley stated that to the best of his recollection the Navy commander of the 
said ship picked out what he thouR:ht was necessary to keep on board and the other 
sfuff, such as furniture, rugs which were cleaned and packed in camphor by some 
company engaged for that purpose, and pictures taken from frames by same company 
enga^ged for that purpose — all of such stuff was sent to the Manhattan warehouse at 
Fifty-second Street and Seventh Avenue, and receipts for the same, to the best of 
Mr. Manley *s recollections, were given to Capt. Yates or Mr. Seth, but he thinks the 
former. 

T learned that Inspector Reynolds is now on his vacation and would return next 
week. Mr. Judson, of the Biltmore, is now manager of a hotel in Habana, Cuba, for 
the Biltmore (3o. 

Mr. Andrew Kiefer, former secretary to Capt. Yates, states that he recalls seeing the 
receipts for the furniture, pictures, and otherwise, taken from the said steamship, in 
the bands of Capt. Yates and Mr. Seth, but never in the files of this office. 

The receipts for articles taken from the steam^ip George Washington are now in the 
tiles of the Shipping Board at 45 Broadway. 

- Superintendent of Guards. 



Decbmrek 12, 1919. 
Collector op Customs, 

Custom HotLUj New York City. 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan (furniture, etc.). 
Attention of Mr. Stewart. 

Dear Sir: This will serve to introduce to you Mr. J. E. Farrell, connected with the 
ITnited States Shipping Board, Division of Operations, Passenger Ship Section, Con- 
struction and Repair Department. 

The object of Mr., FarrelPs visit is to seek information in reference to the furniture 
and other fittings which were removed from the steamship Leviathan during the time 
that she was under the jurisdiction of your office. 

Any information that you can give us, as to what disposition was made of this 
material, will be appreciated. 
Very truly, yours, 

R. L. Hague. 

By , 

Passenger Ship Section^ Construction arid Repair Department, 

December 12, 1919. 
Mr. P. A. S. Franklin, 

Intematumal Mercantile Marine Co.^ New York City, 

Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs: Steamship Agamemnon, Steamship Leviathan. 

Dear Sir: This will advise you that while I am away it is my desire to have you 
take up all details of work for the steamship Agam£mnon and the steamship Leviathan, 
which you would ordinarilv take up with me, with Mr. George W. Sterling, assistant- 
director of operations, at this address. 

Mr. Sterling will also represent me during my absence on the committee on fuel 
oil and in the preparation of plans and specincations. 
Yours, very truly, 

Manager, 
Construction and Repair Department. 



University of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor. December 11, 1919. 
Mr. R. L. Hague. 

Divisi/)n of Operations, United States Shipping Board, New York. 

Subject: Inclining experiment, steamship Leriathan. 

Dear Mr. Hague: On receipt of a telegram from Mr. Gibbs. of the International 
Mercantile Mariiie, at your request, 1 attended the inclining experiment of the steam- 
ship Leviathan. 

Far purpNOses of record I am sending the following results, which are subject to 
final checking: 



1602 SHIPPING BOARD OFBRATIOKS. 

The average value of the metacentric height at the time of the experiment 
appro ximatelv 1.60 ffeet (one, point six). 

The vessel had also approximately 3,000 tons of water ballast, as well as the p«ma- 
nent pig iron already placed in her. 

Under the circumstances, therefore, I would not advise that the veasel be moved 
about in the ''light condition," or. in other words, the water ballast should be retained 
when no cargo or ccial is on hoard. 
Yours, very truly, 

Herbert C. Sadler. 

P. S. — I have not vet received the letter of instructions relative to these vi 



December 10, 1919. 
Mr. Frank Munson^ 

Munson Steamship Lint, New York City, 

My Dear Mr. Munson: I tried unsuccessfully several times to get you on the tde* 
phone before my departure for Washiijgton. 

The tentative agreement between the International Mercantile Marine and the 
Shipping Board regarding the steamships Leviathan, Agamemnon^ and the Mount 
Vernon Has not been signed as yet, consequently I am not in a position to furnish you 
with copy of same. 

I have carefully gone over the figures for the necessary inspection force on the South 
American vessels, and this, according to my calculations, can be done for not over 
|2,600 per vessel. However, I am prepared, if your figujres can justify it, to recom- 
mend $3,000 per ship per month. 
V«y truly, yours, 

Manager, 
Conttnustion and Repair Department, 



EXTRACT PROM MINUTES OF CONFERENCE HELD DECEMBER 9, 1919. 

Mr. Hague reported that as to the expense and delay entailed by proposed changes 
in plan for interior decorations, etc., of the 535 and 502 foot passenger ships under 
construction, there was a meeting in New York last Thursday, at which it was learned 
that none of the yards knew exactly what they were building. He stated that the 
builders were directed to prepare complete specifications of the vessels; that the build- 
ers complained about the chuiges which were made from time to time, and no builder 
knew wnen the first vessel would be completed; that it was thought some may be com- 

Jleted in April, but he personally does not think tlie first ship will be completed before 
uly. He stated that he is preparing definite specifications and that there would be 
appointed a committee from each of the three builders engaged in this work, and the 
Division of Operations would take care of any dispute that might arise; and that 
arrangements nave been made with the International Mercantile Marine Co. to act as 
the agents for the Shipping Board in this matter. 

He stated that tentative arrangements had been made with Cramps and Fletchers on 
the part of the International Mercantile Marine Co. to restore each vessel; that the 
repair yards at Newport News and Bethlehem thought that specifications should be 
prepared with sufficient detail to enable an intelligent bid to be made on a lump-sum 
basis, which is the only businesslike basis, as it would then be known what the job 
will cost; that these specifications will be ready in four or five weeks. 

Mr. Gillen suggested that action on this matter be postponed until the next meeting 
so that a discussion could first be had with Chairman Payne. 

After a further discussion, on motion of Mr. Ackerson, seconded by Mr. Cuahlng, and 
duly carried, the following resolution was adopted: 

Renohedf That consideration be given to the question of employing an expert 
architect or architects to assist the board in fixing the plans and specifications for the 
rehabilitation of the three IxMits Lexiaihan^ Agamemnon, and Mount Vernon. 



December 9, 1919. 
Capt. William J. Ryan, 

Master Steamship ' 'Leviathan,'* Hohoken, N, J, 

Dear Sir: Referring to vour letter of the 5th instant, in which you advise that the 
Inclining experiments on lx)ard your vessel have been completed and that tanks are 



SHIPPING BOARD OFBRATIONS. 1603 

» 

filled for proper ballastiiif , you are hereby authorized to again open necessary porta 
^md doors on F and G decks and to ship F deck gangway. 
Very truly, yours, 

R. L. Hague. 

By , 

Passenger Ship Sectum, Construction and Repair Department. 

Dbcember 8, 1919. 
H. A. Evaofl, 

President Baltimore Drydock d: Shipbuilding Co.^ 

Baltimore^ Md. 

Acknowledging your message this date relative repairs on former German passen^r 
ships. It is my intention to put out all this work to competitive bidders, and with 
exception Leviathany Mount Vemon, Von Steuben^ and Agamemnon^ are contempiatinfi; 
asking your company to bid. Have already given instructions that vou should 
receive copies specifications on following vessels: Santa ElisOy De Kcdb. Maeolus^ 
and Gudloa. All these bids are to be in next Monday, and in case through any mis- 
take you have not received copies specifications telephone me immediately. 

Robert L. Hague. 



International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office Chief of Construction, 

New York, December 8, 1919. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Division of Constnidion and Repair. 

United States Skipping Board E. F. C, New York QUy. 

Dear Mr. Hague: In view of the fact that we expect to place our crew on the 
'Steamship Leviathan in the near future, it would be very much appreciated if ^rou 
will send ua a crew list, with rates of pay and information as to the terms ux)on which 
this crew is at present employed. 
Very truly, yours, 

Wm. Francis Gibbs, 
Chief of Construction. 

m 

International Mercantile Marine Co., 

Office Chief op Construction, 

Netv York, December 8, 1919. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Manager Construction and Repair Department, Division of Operations, 

United States Shipping Board, E. F. €., New York City. 

Bear Mr. Hague : Your letter of December 4, authorizing the employment of three 
nude stenographers to be used by the representatives of the different repair yards on 
the steamship Leviathan has been received and we will proceed in accordance with 
«iine. 

Very truly, yours, 

Wm. Francis Gibbs, 

Chief of Construction . 



December 8, 1919. 
Mr. Cletus Keating, 

Care of Messrs. Kirlin, Woolsey dc Hickox, New Ybrk. 

Dear Mr. Keating: Yoiur letter of December 3. I have been over the proposed 
agreement inclosed with your letter with Mr. Dutch and Mr. Hague. We are agreeable 
to the suggested changes with the following exceptions: 

^^ Paragraph A. We feel that the words ''and regular staff" should be retained after 
^'executive officers. " 

Paragraph D. We can not accept vour second sentence in place of second sentence 
» our draft which read *'They shall be duly inspected by the agent's construction 
^partment". As to employment of additional mspectors you are protected under 
ClauBe B. 

Paragraph 4. We feel we should not add your sentence as to access to owner's books. 
We are sure that we are in a position to protect your interests without this clause. 



1604 SHIPPING BOABD OPBRilTIONS. 

Paragraph 6. We desire to strike out the last words, namely '* sails on her first voy- 
age ". This more accurately defines the termination of the agency service. 

Paragraph 7. Following out the suggestion of the previous paragraph, strike out in 
the third line the words ''sales on her first voyage" and substitute therefor '^ those on 
berth for loading. " • 

If you will approve of these changes, Mr. Ha^ue and I will submit the agreement 
to the trustees of the Emergency Fleet Corporation for their final approval. You will 
understad, of course, that thev have not yet agreed to the rate of compensation; but we 
are prepared to recommend the suggeste^i figure of $15,000. 
Yours, very tnily, 

J. E. CvHHiso, Director of OprratwM. 



Dkcembrk 8, I9I9. 
International Mercantile Marine Co., 

New York City. 
Attention Mr. W. F. Gibbs, steamship Leviathan. 

Dear Sir: For your information, we inclose herewith copy of instructions issued 
to our Capt. Parker in connec'tion with the accommodations of your inspectors. 
Very truly, youis, 

R. L. Hague, 

By 

PoMrnger Ship Sertionf Corutnictian and Repair Department. 

December 8. 1919. 
Memorandum for Capt. Parker, steamship LetuUhan. 

We are advised that the International Mercantile Marine wish to have arrange- 
ments for six or seven of their inspectors to sleep aboard the above vessel. 

I have taken this matter up with Mr. Hague over the telephone and am instructed 
to have you make such ne<*e8sary arrangements, not only to sleep these men alxMUtl, 
but also to furnish them meals. 

R. L. Hague, 

By 

Passenger Ship Section, Construction ana Repair Department. 

Dbcembbr 6, 1919. 
Mr. Cletus Keating, 

In care of Messrs. Kirlin, Woolsey A Jliekox, Nen^ York. 

My Dear Mr. Keating: This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter of December 
4 inclosing revised form of agreement covering the reconditioning of the I^tnathan, 
I have submitted this form to our legal division for their comments and expect to 
present it to the board early next week. N 

In 80 far as I can tell from a rather hurried examination, the form of agreement is 
satisfactory although as you know the board has not yet expressed its acquiescence in 
the compensation suggested by Mr. Franklin. 
Yours, very truly, 

J. E. CusHiNG, Director of Operations. 



The Conneaut Metal Works Co., 

Conncaut, Ohw, December 6, 1919. 
International Mercantile Marine, 

Nnr York City. 

Attention Mr. W. L. McQuillan, Office of Chief Construction. 

Gentlemen: 1. Following your inquir>', the writer made on December 4, 1919, 
a cursory examination of the electric lighting equipment on )x)ard the Leviathan. 

2. Not knowing how extensive any plans may be for reequipping this vessel, I can 
only outline briefly my impressions both as an illuminating engineer and as a light- 
ing equipment manufacturer, 

3. Reequipment plans fall under two schemes: One utilizing present German equip- 
ment as lar as possible; the other to completely replace with American standaid 
equipment. 



SHIP^INO BOARD 0PBBATI0K8. 1605 

With a detailed survey available it M^ould be a simple matter to decide between the 
above on the basis of cost. I note instances of the usual conflict between the engi- 
neer and the artist or decorator in the present installation. 

Structural features of the ship, plus appearance, some times cause lights to be lo- 
cated at points where they do not give the best illumination; but usually in such in- 
stances the result can be improved by proper reflection and right-sized lanlp without 
aacriflcing standardization. 

4. Undoubtedly the crounded return, or single wire system, used will be replaced 
by American standard full metallic wiring. The labor involved in this would not be 
materially increased by changing location, increasing or decreasing the number of 
light outlets where it would seem advisable. 

5. The capacity of the present generating equipment may, or may not, permit a 
quantity of light to conform to established American illumination standards. 

6. It certainly seems desirable, for many reasons, to replace all German sockets, 
switches, and receptacles with American makes. 

7. With the exception of water-tight fixtures, single-light fixtures on both decks 
and bulkheads are laigely made of porcelain. 

Porcelain fixtures have not been used in America to an^ extent. The number of 
broken, chipped and cracked fixtures observed by the writer on the Leviathan, CaU 
iahOj and Cap Fivestre would especially condemn them for use on board ships. To 
retain the good ones, and duplicate them, would not be a serious or expensive matter, 
but as all fixtures will have to be removed, for rewiring and refinishing, it would 
appear best to replace them with brass fixtures. 

8. The decroative types, or artistic fixtures, in large public rooms would need to be 
rewired and refinished. Where some of this type of fixture is missing the cost of new 
pattemfr to duplicate, plus the expense of rewinng and refinishing, might prove more 
expensive than furnishing a new design of fixture throughout for this particular room. 

9. Switches and receptacles are all siuiace tvpe, ungainly in appearance, and do 
not conform to American Fire Underwriters requirements. The writ«r noticed 
where one closet-door switch had caused a fire . This equipment should all be replaced 
with American makes, using flush type where appearance should be given consider- 
ation. 

10. The writer will be pleased to go into this matter further with whoever imder- 
takes to decide these questions. 

For myself I gladly offer my services, and time, where it will not conflict with my 
duties to my companv. 

My company is well equipped to handle work of this character, as our organization 
not only embraces men of long experience in high-grade fixture construction, but 
our experience is building rugged equipment, plus the tools and patterns reauired 
for fixtures especially adapted to ship use, should be of distinct advantage ana offer 
you service not possible from a manufacturer not having our experience or the equip- 
ment we possess for making this type of apparatus. 
Thanking you for your past interest. 
Very truly, yours. 

The C'Onneaut Metal Works Co., 
Heckert Parker. 



Division of Operations, Unfted States Shipping Board E. F. 0. 

Hoboken, N. /., Decembers, 1919, 
From: Master. 

To: R. L. Hague, manager Oonstniction and Repair Department. 
Subject: Including experiment, completion of. 

1. Experiment having been completed and tanks filled for proper ballasting, it 
is requested that I be authorized to again open necessary ports and doors on F and G 
decks and to ship F deck gangway. 

Wm. J. Ryan, 

Master Leviathan, 



December 4, 1919. 
Mr. Wiluam F. Gibbs. 

Chief of Construction, International Mercantile Marine , New York, 

Dear Mr. Gibbs: Confirming telephone conversation of even date, this letter 
will constitute your authority for the employment of three male stenographers to 



1606 SHIPPING BOARD OFBAATIONS. 

be used by the representatives of the different repair yards on the 8team<^p LfHa- 
than. 

You will kindly employ these men and pay them, billing us the same as is ueuat 
for repair W()rk. addrasrting all communications to Mr. R. L. Hague, mani^?er. Depart- 
ment ('onstrurtion and Re|)air. care ship passenger section. No. 45 Broadway. 
There are attached paane'* f4>r the different representatives. 
Very tnily, yours, 

R. L. Hague, 
Manager, Construction and Repair Departnvent. 



MINUTES OP MEBVING HELD DECEMBER 3, 1910, TO DI8CU88 RECONDITIOXIXG OF 



"leviathan " 



The following were present: Mr. R. L. ITaGfuo of the United States Shipping Board* 
Mr. G. W. Sterling of the United States Shipping Board; Mr. P. A. S. Franklin* 
president of the International Mercantile Marine Co.; Mr. W. F. Gibbs, chief of con" 
struction of the International Mercantile Marine Co.; Mr. J. W. Powerll, president o 
the Bethlehem Shipping Corporation; Mr. E. E. Palen, "vice president Newport New' 
Shipbuilding & I>ry Dock Co.; Mr. T. Ross, repair manager of Newport News Ship-* 
building & Dry Dock Co.: Mr. M. A. Neeland, president of New York Shipbuildings 
Corporation: Mr. J. 11. Hull, president of Cramp Ship & Engine Buikling Co.; Mr^ 
W. H. Todd, president of Todd Shipyards Corporation; Mr. Andrew Fletcher, presi- 
dent W. & A. Fletcher Co.; Mr. W. A. Fletcher, jr., vice president W. & A, Fletcher 
Co. ; Mr. E. P. Mor3e, sr., president Morse I)r\' Dock & Repair Co. ; Mr. Cletus Keating, 
of Kirlin, Woolsoy & I lick ox. 

1. The above committee met in pursuance of the following telegraphic in\'itation: 
"With object discussing rehabilitation I leviathan, it would be greatly appreciated 

by Mr. Hague of the Shipping Board, and myself, if you would attend a meeting at 
our office, 9 Broadwav, at 10 o'clock Wedne^ay morning, Decembers. 

"P. A. S. Frankun/' 

2. The meeting was called to order at 10.15 a. m., December 3, 1919, at 9 Broadway, 
by Mr. Franklin, who acted as chairman. The chairman requested Mr. Ua^nie to- 
outline his \iews on the reconditioning of the steamship Leviathan. 

3. l^lr. Hague made the following statement: "In handling this job there has been 
a scheme proposed w^hich we will discuss later, but before agreeing on anything so 
far as the Shipping Board is concerned, and so f ar a« Mr. Franklin's organization is 
concerned, we wanted to get the benefit of a heart-to-heart talk with the leading ship^ 
builders and ship repairers in the country, and try to make use of every suggestion, 
and of all you gentlemen's experience. What we would like to do in the first place 
is to see if it is possible to get a lump-sum price for the complete restoration of that 
vessel. We have no definite plans or specifications. I woula like to hear from you, 
gentlemen, whether it is possible, in view of the indefinite nature of the job, to 
get a lump-sum estimate which would cover restoring that vessel to her original con- 
dition j>lus the installation of a fuel-oil system." 

4. Tne chairman then called on Mr. Palen, who made the following statement: 
"I do not mind being very frank with all you gentlemen at the start. To start Tsith 
the question of taking the ship to Hampton Roads is the thing we are more concerned 
about than anything else. A.side from Mr. Ross, superintendent of repairs, all of our 
people think it is dangerous to take the ship in there. We have not gone very far into 
our investigation as to whether it would or not. The ship draws, I think, 35 feet of 
water and in our channel which runs out to Cape Henrv, 20 miles, there is only 35 feet 
of water and if the ship got ashore I do not know whetlier we could get her out or not. 
W^e do not want to be a party to getting the ship ashore in Hampton Roads. If we 
could handle the ship in Hampton Roads we probably could give a fixed price on her^ 
It would probably take two or three months to get up the specifications and make a 
survey. A lot would depend on how light you could get the ship, (^ould you get it 
to 35 feet? If not, we do not want to be a party even though you took the responsi- 
bility of taking her in. However, we are willing to cooperate even though some one 
else does the work, and help prepare specifications and ad\ice, etc., but as far as the 
work goes, I do not think we could take her in." 

5. At the chairman's invitation, Mr. Powell made the following statement: ''For 
the same reason as Mr. Palen states, we can not dock the ship at any of our yards. 
The yards have not water enough in the approaches leading to them. We are liable 
to work in with some one else, but only part of the work because of the bulk of the 
work is to be done at New York. I think if I would do the job I would split it in two- 



SHIPPING BOAKD OPERATIONS. 1607 

parts. I would do as much as was reasonable to do on a fixed price basis, coal burning 
change to fuel oil, electrict lighting, plumbing, etc., and the rest on a cost-plus fee 
basis. If we could take time enough to get specifications, I think we could make a 
lump-fiiun bid on it. I would have hesitation on bidding on some parts of the wood- 
work and decorations. On the rest of it, provided there is enough time, there is no 
reason why you should not receive a lump-sum price on it. However, any assistance 
we can give whether we are in the job or not we will be glad to do so. So far as the work 
of stability, trim, and that sort of thing goes any help we can give is at the disposal of 
whoever gets the job." 

6. The chairman replied: "We are of the opinion that the ship can not go to Hamp- 
ton Roads, can not go to Cramps, and we know really of no place outside of New 
York where she can go. It would be exceedingly risky and we would not recommend 
the Shipping Board doing it." 

7. The chairman requested the views of Mr. Morse as to the possibility of porforming 
the work on a lump-sum contract basis. Mr. Morse replied as follows: "I have not 
gone over the matter and given it very much consideration, but I think before giving 
an opinion our people would like to look the ship over. I think we could figure on 
the job and doing the job. 1 think we could make a lump-sum proposition for the 
job. Of course, we have not looked the ship over, and we would like to do so before 
making a definite decision. I could make a decision by to-morrow as to whether or 
not we could make you a lump-sum ^timate, then it would be up to your surveyors 
to make up the specifications as to what you wanted and we could figure on it. It's 
a big job, but I can not see why a firm with facilities could not do the work." 

8. The chairman made an inquiry as to where Mr. Morse would propose to do the 
work, and Mr. Morse replied: "All during the war we had an oflSce at the pier, I 
think the place is there yet, and with lighters, boats, automobile trucks, etc., we 
turned out the ships as fast as at our yard, in fact, a little faster. Of course, I appre- 
ciate that this is a very heavy job, and a job difficult to figure on, but I think it can 
be done." 

9. The chairman then called on Mr. Gibbs, who replied as follows: "Of course, Mr. 
Morse puts the burden of time required to figure on a lump-sum basis on the owners, 
who have to draw plans and specincations. I think that we all agree that the specifi- 
cations for all the work on the ship, to enable men to go into it, would mean the taking 
up of a tremendous amount of time, and when the specifications were finished a great 
deal of time would be needed by the builder to go over them and determine his bid. 
I do not know how long the specification work would take, but I think as Mr. Pal en 
said it would take a matter of months for us to draw specifications of sufficient detail 
to enable men to intelligently bid on them and then, for a man to go over them and 
make up his bid would take a great deal more time. It would mean a matter of 
months to do it. 

10. Mr. Powell then suggested that the work could be divided into certain big 
items; for example, the fuel-oil installation, and that certain of these items could be 
handled on a fixed price basis, leaving the other items to be handled on a cost-plus fee. 

11. Mr. Gibbs, in reply, then pointed out the verv^ great difficulty of subdividing 
the work with the exception of the oil-fuel installation. He poiTited out that the 
plumbins:, ventilation, electric light, interior communications, and joiner work in a 
ship of this type, that all of the work, in fact, has <rot to proceed as a whole-, and that 
under the=»e circumstances it would be very complicated to have four or five firms, 
for example, doing a particular class of work, f'urther, it would mean the greatest 
difficultv and a great expenditure of time to make complete specifications to enable 
a lump-sum bid to be made. 

12. The chairman then a?ked Mr. Morse, "Wliat do you think of what Mr. Gibbs 
has said about the time to draw the specifications as really being the time corsiimed 
to make repairs in some cases?" 

Mr. Morse replied to this a.s follows: **I should not think it woiild take montlis. It 
might take a month. I suppose that it would be dependent enMrely on the numbcT 
of men vou send to the ship and put on the job." 

13. The chairman then asked Mr. Mull for his views and he replied as follows: 

'*I think 1 have said all I can sav. You are familiar with my views. We absolutely 

would not undertake anv part of the work bv estimating or giving a lump-sum price, 

I have spent hours on the ship, and after what we have gone through with the Nfw 

York, tearing her out and going over the whole shooting match. 1 think that aftor 

that experience we would never try to tackle another job by giving an estimate." 

14. The chairman then called on Mr. P'letcher, who replied: ** I have been over the 
ship and spent quite some time on her and 1 think it Is a job that you can not give a 
lump-sum pnce on. I d i not see how an vone can doit. 1 feel that if you get a bunch 
of contractors on there you are going t) have all kinds of trouble with labor. 1 believe 



1608 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

that the job should ]>e given out to someone. Regarding the oil-fuel installation, we 
are dealing with water-tube boilers and not Scotch boilers. I think the oil in^tslU- 
tion is pretty nearly like a Government war Bhip. and quite a difference between 
water-tube boilers and ordinary Scotch boilers. There is a lot of responsibility con- 
nected with the job, lot£i of technical things to be considered, stability of the ship, 
etc., and anyone to say what he could do would have to look it over. The whole 
thing must be carefully gone into, even the installation of the oil has to be very care- 
fully gone into. This is a job that will take the very best talent you can get. It is 
ho ordinary repair job bv any means. 1 am very much a^id that the utbor con- 
ditions around the port of New York are none too good. If you start to subdivide the 
work, some contractors might work 44 hours a week, others 48 hours a week. Some 
subcontractors might pay their labor more than we pay. I only look into this in the 
interests of the United States so far as the Fletcher Co. is concerned. If we do not 
get the job, 0. K. It ia a job everyone should be interested in. Not only the money 
end of it but to make a job everyone would be proud of. I think Mr. Gibbs hv 
expressed this matter very well. I think that if the gentlemen here who have not 
been on the ship were to go on they would think pretty.nearly as Mr. Gibbs has said." 

15. The chairman then made the following remarks: **The situation regarding this 
ship is that Mr. Hague represents the Shipping Board and has a tremendous respon- 
sibility in connection with this ship. In addition to that, it seems to me that evoy- 
body around this table and everybody interested in the development of an American 
Merchant Marine should be interested in seeing that the very best thing possible b 
done in connection with this steamer so as to get out a job that will be a credit to the 
United States. We should look at this from a national point of view. I think Mr. 
Hague was very wise in suggesting this conference because he gets not only the opinion 
of everyone present but he wants to be sure that whatever is finally decided up^n 
that action is only taken after very careful thought and deliberation, then I am sure 
that whatever is done, he would like to have from time to time suggestions from every- 
body, and if we are in it, as we hope to be in it, that would be exactly our position. 
We really only look at it from a national point of view. If anyone has a suggestion 
to make, I hope he will make it. We would like to think aloud. 

16. The chairman then asked Mr. Todd what he had to say on this subject and the 
following conversation ensued: 

Mr. Todd. We are in a position to restore that ship aa she was before for a hmip- 
sum price. We have always been against cost plus as you know. We always wanted 
to give lump-sum prices. 

Mr. Franklin. You believe that you can make specifications for restoring the ship 
on which you can make a lump-sum bid? 

Mr. Todd. Yes; I'm sure of tnat. 

Mr. Franklin. How lone would it take you to do it? 

Mr. Todd. About a monui, or maybe six weeks. 

Mr. Hague. Suppose you get up specifications and they inet with Mr. Franklin 'd 
approval, could we use these specifications in getting other bids? 

Mr. Todd. Yes, I would not mind that. 

Mr. Franklin. You would get up specifications and you are willing to have those 
specifications submitted to somebody else for a bid? 

Mr. Todd. Yes. 

Mr. Franklin. Mr. Todd you are prepared to make a lump sum bid for the whole 
business. 

Mr. Todd. We will give you a lump sum on reconditioning job and a lump sum on 
furnishing and installing oil system and price for our oil Dumer. We would not 
take the job on a cost-plus basis. 

17. The chairman then made the following statement which drew forth comment 
as below: 

''Mr. Todd^ my understanding from what you said was that you felt that you could 
prepare specifications with the object of making Uie Shipping Board a proposition 
to put this ship back in exactly the same conaition as she was before ana also a 
furuier proposition to equip her as an oil burner, plans and specifications to be sub- 
mitted. 

Mr. Todd. That is right. 

Mr. Fletcher suggested there would be extras and Mr. Franklin stated, "I do not 
see whv there should be any question of any extras, because you can see exactly 
what the ship was. You can see what her decorations were, glasswork, etc.. was. 
You can give special contracts to decorating firms, furnishing contracts to fumiahing 
firms. You can get estimates from them and I do not see why there should be a 
question of extras. 

Mr. Todd. Nor I either. 



SHIPPIKG BOARD OFBRATIONS. 1609 

Mr. Frank UN. My point is that you want to undertake it and it ought to be under 
taken on a basis that there really be no extras unless the Shipping Board should 
decide as you went along that they wanted something in addition to what the ship 
was before'. 

Mr. Keating. Let them submit a form of contract which would show whether 
thev understand all these matters. 

Mr. Todd. The boilers and engines are in excellent condition. 

Mr. FoANKLiN. In making your tender this has nothing to do with engines, 
bollerd, et:;. 

Mr. Hague then stated that he did not feel that Mr. Todd's corporation as at present 
organized, was capable of successfully carrying out the rehabilitation proposea. 

18. The chairman then called on Mr. Neeland for his opinion which was as follows: 
'*Mr. Franklin, I want to say as a prelude that we could not undertake the work in 
any way. But in my judgment, you would get most satisfactory results by placing 
it with some reliable firm on a cost-plus fixed fee or percentage, I thinx that on 
job of repair and overhauling of that magnitude, it would be so diflicult to determine 
everything in advance the way you want it that you would be delayed in starting to 
be sure you had everything as you wanted or else there would be some changes for 
extra charges. No matter now long vou took, you wpuld still make changes. Ideas 
will grow with the development of the job and maybe changes in the services, etc., 
that you might want to make. I do not see how you can make any contract that 
will prevent the contractor making extra charge for changes. You hiave to pay him 
extra for them. 

Furthermore, I think that any contractor that would bid a fixed price in order to 
provide for extras that will arise for little details here and there will have to put on 
such a large figure to make sure and cover himself, that in the end you will get a lower 
cost by placing it with a reliable firm at the cost-plus fixed fee or cost-plus percentage. 
This is my recommendation in the matter. In addition you should nave some good, 
reliable engineering organization go over the stability and be responsible for stability 
and engineering work, and we would be willing to give such advice and help as we 
could, but we are not in a position to do any drawing office work or shop work. 

Mr. Franklin. My understanding is that you do not feel that you are in a position 
to make a lump sum bid or to do any important work on the ship but are glad to put 
your talent in a consulting capacity in connection with the work to be oone. You 
would be quite prepared to do anything that did not involve drawing office work or 
shopwork. 

Mr. Neeland. Yes. 

19. Mr. Ross made the following statement: *'I was over the ship pretty carefullv 
and I do not see any reason why you can not make a specification for doing the work 
and I do not see why you can not make an estimate for doing the work. I think the 
owners or the Shipping Board should make their own specifications thoroughly and 
completely before anybody else does any work on it, and then let everyone that wants 
to do BO, submit a figure in a lump sum to take care of practically all of the work. 
There are things that can never be duplicated, some of the German work, for instance, 
the Grerman glass that it is impracticable to get in this country or over there. I do 
not see any reaaon why you could not make a lump sum price for nine-tenths of it with 
competent people to make the change to conform with our own practice over here. 
I agree with Mr. Todd absolutely, 1 think to do a cost-plus job would be demoralizing 
to the shipbuilding business. I think you can make proper specifications in a month 
with a proper Organization of men — that is, different people tnoroughly familiar with 
different branches of the work, one to take care of joiner work, another plumbing, 
another decorating, etc., electric lighting, etc. Let these people go over the ship and 
in a month they could produce proper specifications. The difficulty most repair 
people have in doing jobs on a fixed sum is, not in giving a definite price on the work 
as specified, but it is difficult to estimate on your general clauses. The difficulty 
comes when workini? out. It is the general clauses that nobody knows how to esti- 
mate on. General clauses in reconditioning jobs give the difficulty insofar as a defi- 
nite quotation on missing parts are concerned. Sometimes these are taken care of 
in a separate item. If done on that basis, I do not see why a contractor should not be 
able to get it on a lump-sum basis. 

20. The chairman then said-: ''Mr. Hague, you have heard these statements, <^hat 
do you think? 

Mr. Hague replied as follows: "It seems to me that if we can get a lump-sum price, 
we know where we stand. With most shipbuilders here we ha«re had cost-plus con- 
tracts and there is not one whose contract aid not ran long bevoud the time when we 
expected the ship. If it were possible to get a fixed sum on this job with responsible 
people and bear in mind what I said, if we could get a price with responsible people, 

177068—20— PT 4 ^24 



1610 SHIPPING BOABD OPBRATIOlirs. 

I think it ia the ideal way of doing the job and we hold the firm financially and other- 
wiae for the job. It ia much better buainees to know that we are going to spend aeven 
or eight million dollars on the job, than to eueoB what we are going to spend and let it 
un up to twelve millions on a cost-plus. If we start on the cost-pins, there is no know- 
ing wnere we will stop. 

Mr. Franklin. Which is going to be the best for the United States — ^to let this ship 
on a cost-plus or as a lump sum — ^which is going to cost the United States less? 

Mr. Powell. I think I would do the job-~I would split it in two parts; I would do 
as much as reasonable to do under a fixed-price basis — oil-burning chajige, fuel oil, 
rehabilitation, electric, plumbing, etc.— and the rest on a cost-plus fee. 

21. Mr. Powell then su^^ested that two committees be formedi to draw up the nec- 
essary specifications to enable a lump-sum bid to be nmde or to determine that part 
only of the work could be done on a lump-sum basis. He farther suggested that Jfr. 
Gibbs be made chairman of both committees. 

22. The chairman then replied as follows: ''Now, gentlemen, the difiSculty is there 
will be endless questions arising, and the committee ought to live on that ship and 
should devote their entire time and have no call to their own business and the speci- 
fications when completed should be so complete that Mr. Morse and Mr. Todd should 
not be able to say that they were not in accordance with what was in their mind, 
etc. Plans should be first drawn and then tenders asked for. What is the most 
effective wav of having the specifications drawn so that they will not only cover 
everything, but will be as expeditiously done as possible for the two firms who are 
Quite prepared to make a lump-sum bid. and in such a wav that there will be no 
aiscussion about it? If it will nelp matters, we are quite willing to have Mr. Gibbs 
and his organization do any part of the work that it is desired for them to do, and 
if there is some engineer we could associate with Mr. Gibbs, we are quite willing to 
take him on, but it will be necessary to have a representative on that committee of 
those who have intention of making a bid and also such other talent as is desirable to 
make a thorough job as possible. What sort of a committee could we get?" 

23. A general discussion then followed, and it was finallv decided (hat each of the 
heads of the large shipyards, viz: Mr. Powell, Mr. Palen, Idr. Mull, and Mr. Neeland, 
should select experts from their organizations and that these experts should be di- 
vided into two committees, one committee to take in hand the entire oil-burning 
matter and write the necessary specifications and prepare the necessary drawing, 
taking into account the construction, stowage, stability, etc.; this committee to consiset 
of representatives as follows: 

Mr. Nichols, engineer, will represent the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock 
Co.; Mr. Dobson. naval architect, will represent the Cramp Snip & Engine Building* 
Co.; Mr. Milne, engineer, will represent the Todd Shipyards Corporation; Mr. Gibbs 
will represent the I. M. M. Co. 

The second committee will deal with the general rehabilitation specifications and 
will be formed as follows: 

Mr. Atlee. a representative familiar with pliunbing from the Cramp Ship and 
Engine Building Co.; Mr. Parker, an electrical engineer from the New York Ship- 
building Corporation; Mr. Russell, an expert on joiner work and ventilation from the 
Bethlehem Snipbuilding Co.; Mr. Gibbs will represent the I. M. M. Co. 

In addition tnere will be a representative from each of the repair yards, viz: 

Mr. Hodge from the W. & A. Fletcher Co.; Mr. Jamin from the Todd Shipyards 
Corporation; Mr. Miuray from the Morse Dry Dock & Repair Co, 

24. It was unanimously agreed that Mr. Gibbs should be the chilirman of both 
committees. 

25. The question was raised as to how the expenses of these committees should be 
met, and at Mr. Powell's suggestion it was unanimously agreed that the yards would 
make no charge for the time and expenses of their representatives on these committees, 
but that the expenses of the clerical assistants necessary should be Ixxne by the 
Shipping Board. 

26. It was further decided that the committee should have the right to call in any 
experts that they may consider necessary to aid them in their work, the expenses 
to be lx)rne by the Shipping Board. 

27. It was further unanimously agreed that Mr. Hague should be a member ofilcio 
with the right to attend meetings of the committee. 

28. It was further unanimously agreed that each of the yards would see to it that the 
member representing them shoujki give his entire time to this work for the period 
necessary to complete the specifications and for this purpose the members will uve in 
New York during the progress of the work. 

29. It was further unanimously agreed that the specifications should be prepared 
by the representatives of the four shipbuilding yards and the I. M. M. Co., viz: Cramp 



SHIPPING BOABD OPBRATIOKS. 1611 

Ship & Engine Building Co., New York Shipbuilding Corporation, and the I. M. M. Co. 
and that the repreeentativee of the repair yards would have the right to criticize and 
suggest improvements in such specifications and familiarize themselves with the specifi- 
cations ana with the ship so tnat when the specificationB are finished and bids are 
asked for, various repair yards will be familiar with the specifications and all condi- 
tions surrounding bias and no changes wUl be made at the request of the repair yards 
in the specifications after they have been prepared, because the repair yard repre- 
aentatives will have ample opportunity to present changes they desire to have made 
to the committee and if such changes are not agreed to'by the committee at the time, 
thev will not be made thereafter. 

3&. It was agreed that specifications and plans should be so drawn that extras will 
be absolutely eliminated from the contract and that the repair yards or other bidders 
will be reqiured to make such changes as the work progressed as may be necessary to 
make oil utilities workable and give us satisfactory a ship as when the vessel first 
came out. 

31. The first meeting of the committee will be a joint meeting to be held at Room 
406, 9 Broad wa}r, at 10.15 a. m., Thursday, December 4, 1919. 

32. The meeting adjourned at 10.30 p. m. 



[Page No. 1 of the following letter is missing from the file in Exhibit D.] 

possibility of obtaining sufficiently skilled firemen. Twenty knots with coal call fo 
the best quality coal, which costs $7.50 per ton in ship's bunkers, Eoboken, and 
$19 at the British port, Southampton, where this vessel would coal. 

The Division of Operations contemplates using the Leiiaihan on a 21-day schedule 
between New York, Southampton, and Cherbourg, France. It is impossible for this 
vessel to maintain this schedule burning coal and we have contemplated changing 
^e Leviathan to an oil burner with a total fuel capacity of 10,250 tons which will be car- 
ried in the wing bunkers abreast the boilers, the double bottoms under the boilers, and 
in deep tanks installed in the after part of No. 3 hold. 

Your attention is called to the fact that the Navy Department planned to install a 
number of independent tanks in the hold and bunker spaces of theXmat/ian, claiming 
that the ship's structure worked and that it would be impossible to make the ship's 
aide, bulkheads, or decks oil tight. With their plans, the vessel would not carry 
sufficient bunkers for round trips and it would be necessary to replenish ship's 
bunkers on the other side. 

At present the wing bunkers are being tested with water to a^ertaiu definitely the 
structural changes involved in the conversion to oil tanks. 1 went into this personally 
very carefully and can assure you there is no logical foundation for this assumption. 
There are no signs of working on calking seams or rivets of any part of the structure 
which we intend to make oil tight. 

In the meantime it ia knowii that the following work is reauired, and although an 
actual quotation has not yet been received, due to the fact tnat our detailed epocifi- 
cations can not be completed until the bunkers have been tested, I estimate the cost 
will be approximately $1,350,000 and it "will require 6 months' time: 

FORWARD OROSS BUNKERS, FRAMES NO. 224 TO NO. 236 FROM TANK TOP TO 1 DECK. 

Forward bulkhead on frame No. 236, built of f-inch plating, }-inch single riveting, 
4-inch pitch, 7-inch channel iron stiffeners, 36 inches apart., with |-inch rivets, 6-inch 
pitch. This bulkhead is attached to tank top \(ith 4 by 4 oy } inch angle bar, single 
riveted. 

This bulkhead is not suitable for oil work; same to be completely removed and new 
oil-tight bulkhead installed. 

After bulkheads on frame No. 224 in yxings and frame No. 226 amidships built of 
J-inch and |-inch plating, |-inch double riveting, 3-inch pitch; 11 -inch channel iron 
Btififeners, 30 inches apart, reinforced on outer edge ^ith 4 by 3 by ^ by ^ inch angle 
bars and i by 6 inch face plates. 

This bulkhead is suitable for an oil bulkhead. 

Water-tight doors in amidship section of thiB bulkhead to be plated over and neces- 
sary stiffeners fitted in way of same. 

Tunnel through bunkers built of i-inch plating, |-inch double riveting, 3-inch pitch. 
Stiffeners spaced 36 inches apart, |-inch riveting, 6-inch pitch. 

Tunnel connected to tank top wkh 7 by 3} by i inch angle bar. 



\ 



1612 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

To make thu« tunnel suitable for oil work will be neceasan' to fit additional stiffeners 
between present Htiffeners and remove present angle bar at tank top connection and 
inntall a 7 by 5 by ^ in^h anj^le bar. 

All insulation on intdde of tunnel to be removed in way of proposed oil tank. 

Piping, electric wirefl. conduita, etc., running through tunnel to be removed to 
effect repairs and afterwards replaced. 

Center line bulkhead from top of tunnel to I deck built of }-inch plating, {-inch 
single riveting, 4-inch pitch, 7-inch channel iron stiffeners 36 inches apart. 

This bulkhead in not suitable for oil work; same to be completely removed and new 
oil-ti?ht bulkhead installed. 

I deck built of i-inch plating, {-inch single riveting, 3-inch pitchy 10-inch channel 
iron deck beams 36 inches apart. Plating fastened to inner snell « ith 4 by 4 by } 
inch ande staplesi around beamit under deck and a 4 by 4 by i inch angle bar on top 
of deck. 

This deck is suitable for oil-tii?ht work. 

Eight trimming holeii in deck plating to l>e plateil over. 

Suitable longitudinal and transven>e swash bulkheads to l>c installed in both port 
and starboard cros« bunkers for carrying oil. 

Manholes in tank top and inner shell to be removed and suitable oil-tinht manhole 
covers fitted. 

All piping and electric wiring extending into forward cross bunkers to he removed 
and rearranged. 

All insulation on after bulkheads of cross bunkers to he removed. 

FORWARD PUMP ROOM AND BLOWER ROOM. BOTH PORT AND STARBOARD SIDES. FROM 

FRAMES NO. 219 TO NO. 224. 

After bulkhead of pump room in way of No. 1 port and starlioard side bunkem, 
bulit of J-inch plating, fastened to present channel frame of ship with J-inch single 
riveting, 3 f -inch pitch. 

This bulkhead i** not suitable to form oil-tight bulkhead at a forward end of Xo. 1 
ride bunkers, necessary to remove section of bulkhead in way of bunkers and build 
new oil-tight transverse bulkhead in pump room. This bulkhead to be riveted to 
present ship's frame and made as near oil-tight as possible. 

Will be necejwary to remove part of fan casing and air duct in blower rooms to install 
new bulkhead. 

LONOITUDIN.\L BILKHEADS FOR PORT AND STARBOARD SIDE BUNKERS FROM FRAMES 

NO. 219 EXTENDING PROM TANK TOP TO H DECK. 

Bulkheads built of J-inch plating, J-inch double riveting, 4J-inch pitch up to I 
deck, l-inch single riveting, 4i-inch pitch I deck to H deck. 

Plate laps below I deck triple riveted, J-inch riveta, 3}-inch pitch. 

Plate laps above I deck double riveted. »Stiffeners are 8 and 12 inch channels, 
alternat.? 36 inches apart, J-inch riveting. 7-inch pitch; 8-inch channel iron stiffeners 
stop at I deck; i 2-inch channel stiffeners extend to H de<*k. 

Bulkheads connected to tank top with 4^ by 4^ by J inch angle bar, single riveted 
Bulkheads connected to transverse bulkheads with 4 by 3^ by J inch angle bar. 
I inch single riveting, lx)th flanges 3i-inch pitch. 

To make these bulkheads oil-tight, will be necessary to remove angle bar at tank 
top connection and fit new 6 by 6 by | inch angle, double riveted, fit a 10-inch channel 
iron stiffener between present 8 and 12 inch channel stiffeners from tank top to 1 deck 
and 10-inch channel iron stiffeners between present 12-inch channel stifTenerg« from 
I deck to II deck. 

H deck beams parsing through these bulkheads to be cut and bracketed both sides. 

Ash-ejector openings, door openings, flooding openings, etc.. to be suitably plated 
over. 

All steam, water, and exhaust piping, electric wires, conduits, etc.. fastened to 
bulkheads to be removed to effect repairs and afterwards replaced with suitable oil- 
tight hangers fitted to bulkheads for same. Longitudinal air ducts on bulkheads 
fastened to same with 2 by 2 by i inch angle bar, f single riveted. 

The bulkhead forms the outboard side of this casing. 

Not necessary to remove air ducts, and consider connection of same to bulkhead 
suitable for oil work, but recommend cutting number of doors in same for convenience 
of additional work to bulkhead. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 



1613 



TRAK8VER8E BULKHEADS. 

In port and starboard side bunkers, from tank top to H deck on frames Nob. 126, 
161, 174, and 199, built of j-inch plating, f-inch double riveting. 3-inch pitch. 
Stiffeners, 8 and 12 inch channels, alternate, }-inch rivets, 8-inch pitch. BulkneadB 
i-onuected to shell with double 5 by 4} by } inch angle bar riveting to bulkhead , 
|-inch single. 3|^inch pitch, riveting to shell, 1-inch rivets, 4-in(h pitch on one bar 
and 8-inch pitch on other bar. 

To make these bulkheads oil-tight, will be necessary to fit an additional 10-inch 
channel stiffener between present stifTeners. 

Pump-room bulkheads in port and starboard side bunkers, from t<ink top to I deck, 
on frames Xoe. 149, 164, 197, and 202, built of ^-inch plating, |-inch single riveting. 
4-inch pitch. Stiffeners 3 feet apart. Bulkhead fastened to ship's channel frame. 

I deck plating o\ er pump rooms in cut-out in way of frames and openings covered 
w4th cement checks. 

These bulkhead and decking in wav of pump rooms can not be made oil-tight with- 
out dry-docking the vessel and completely renewing same ^^dth suitable shell connec- 
tions, therefore, recommend pumps be installed in firerooms on suitable foundations. 

Additional oil-tight bulkheads to be fitted in port and starboard side bunkers from 
tank top to H deck on frames Noe. 134, 142. 158, 166, 182, 190, 207, and 215. 

These bulkheads to be connected to present ship's frames and shell connectionB 
made as near oil-tight as possible. 

By installing above bulkheads the port and starboard side bunkers will be divided 
into 12 oil tanks each side. 

It ynW be necessary to install a transverse swa^h bulkhead in each one of these tanks 

H de(!k in way of port and starboard side bunkers built of J-inch plating, f^incb 
riveting. 3-inch pitch, 10-inch channel deck beams 36 inches apart. Deck plating^ 
fastened to shell plating with 5 by 5 by ^ inch angle clips and to inboard side of frames 
with 5 by 5 by ^ inch angle bar. Space between this bar and shell plating filled in 
with cement chocks. 

To make this deck oil-tight, will be necessary to remove cement chocks, shell clips^ 
and frames binding bar and fit 5 by 5 by } inch angle stapled to shell and frames. 

All trinmiing holes in deck to be plated over. 

All coal ceiling, piping, electric wiring, and conduits in side bunkers to be removed 
and piping, wiring, and conduits to be rearranged. 

Both port and starboard side bunkers, from H deck to J de<'k, extend aft to frame 
No. 118. Both these pockets will be suitable for oil, J deck being stapled to shell of 
ship and H deck to be dealt with as previously recommended. 

Double-bottom tanks to be used for oil to be opened up, cleaned, and tested U> 
suitable head of water. 

All manhole doors in ballast tanks to be used for oil to be fitted with oil-tight gaskets* 

Will be necessary to remove large part of flooring in firerooms and passages between 
boilers when testing tank tope, and piping on tank tops removed and rearranged to 
suit oil installation. 

A number of drains and scuppers through ship's side in side bunkers to be blanked 
off under deck and new leads fitted above H deck. 

The oil burning equipment itself indicated below will cost $89,700: 



138 special forced-draft furnace fronts to 
operate in connection with the existing 
system of forced draft. 
46 spare bumere'. 
368 spare burner tips. 
268 spare burner atomizing cones. 
8 complete oil heating, pumping, and 
straining outfits each consistine of — 
4 oil heaters, any three of which are 

capable of operating six boilers. 
2, 74 by ^ by 10 duplex horizontal 

oil-fitted pumps. 
1 duplex suction oil strainer. 

1 duplex discharge oil strainer. 

2 pump-regulating valves. 



8 complete oil heating, pumping, and 
straining outfits each consisting of---Con.. 
1 3-inch oil meter. 
1 stand pipe. 

1 steam trap. 

5 thermometers. 
5 pressure gauges. 
Spares: 

2 suction strainer baskets. 

2 discharge strainer baskets. 

1 spare set valves, studs and' springs 

lor oil end of service pumps. 
1 slide valve, rod with nut and 

double eye for steam end of service 
. pumps. 



There can be no question as to the advantages of operating this vessel as an oil burner. 
As a matter of ^ct, it is only by doing this that we can at all operate the Leviathan 
under the American flag. ySi ith coal, the best possible speed win be under 20 knots, 
while with oil a schedule of 21 knots can easily be maintained. 

For your convenient reference, I submit below a statement reflecting a comparison 
of the results between the operation of this vessel as a coal, and as oil burner at '^ 



1614 SHIPPING BOARD OPEBATIONS. 

knots and as an oil burner at 21 knots. This statement is based on the &ct that the 
vessel will be laid up out of commission for repairs, dry-docking, etc., one voyife 
per year: 



Burning coal 20-knot schedule: 

Steam days 14 

Portda>s 11 

Tumaroimd, days 25 



Burning oil 20-knot schedule: 

Steaming days 14 

Port days 8 

Turnaround, days 22 



Voyage per year 12 | Voyage per year 15J 

Burning oil 21-knot schedule: 

Steaming days 15 

Port days 13 

Tiunaround, days 28 

Voyages per year 16^ 

Daily consumption at sea, 860 tons coal. Daily consumption in port, 73 tons coal. 
Consumption per voyage, 12,865 tons. Cost of coal per voyage, 1170,461.25. Number 
engine-room crew, 293. Wages engine-room crew, $23,643.75. Subsistence pe^ 
voyage, $7,325. Total, $201,430. 

Dsoly consumption at sea, 580 tons or 3,551 bazrels. Daily consumption in port, 
50 tons or 335 barrels. Consumption per voyage, 7,8^ tons or 52,394 oajrels. Cost 
of oil per voyage, $51,346.12. Number engine-room crew, 187. Wages engine-room 
crew, $13,113.76. Subsistence per voyage $4,114. Total, $68,573.88. 

Daily consumption at sea, 650 tons or 4,355 barrels. Daily consumption in port, 
50 tons or 335 barrels. Consumption per voyage, 8,850 tons or 72^65 bairelfl. Cost 
bunkers voyage, $71,897.70. Number engine-room crew, 187. Wages engine-room 
crew, $13,113.76. Subsistence per voyage, $4,114. Total, $89,125.46. 

Burning oil at 20 knots the vessel actually saves, against 20 knots schedule with 
coal, $132,856.12 per voyage, or in 12 voyages, the number of trips the coal-buminf 
vessel would make in a year, $1,594,273.44, and in addition to this saving as an ou 
burner the vessel would make 3} round trips more than as a coal burner. 

Burning oil at 21 knots the vessel actually saves, against 20 knots schedule with 
coal, $112,304.54 per voyage, or in 12 voyages, the number of trijM the coal-bumu^ 
vessel would make in a year, $1,347,654.48 and in addition to tms saving as an (dl- 
biuner the vessel would make 4^ round-trips more than as a coal burner. 

These proposed voyages are in passenger trade from New York with a port of call 
Southampton, voyage terminatiDg at Cherbouig, France, returning to New York via 
Southampton, port of call. 

I will be able within the next 10 days to seciH;e competitive bids for this work £rom 
the various shipyards in New York Hjurbor. 

Attached find capacity plan of fuel tankage, which has been carefully checked. 

Construction and Bepaib Dbpastmbnt. 



December 3, 1919. 
Mr. Philip Lavoie^ 

New York City, 

Dear Sir: Subject: Steamship Leviathan, Replying to ^ur inquiry of Novem- 
ber 24, we would state that the contract covering the painting and decorating of the 
steamship 'Levialhan has not yet been awaided. 
Very truly youis, 

R. L. Haoub, 

By 

Passenger Skip Section^ 
Construction and Repair Department, 



MINI7TES OF A CONFERENCE OF THE EXECUTIVE HEADS OF THE UNITED STATES 8HIF- 
PING BOARD AND THE BMBROENCT FLEET CORPORATION, DECEMBER 2, 1919. 

Convened 9.35; adjourned 11.20 a. m. 

I^esent: Chairman Payne; Treasurer Tweedale; General Comptroller Abadie; 
Assistant General Counsel Dean; Director of Operations Cushing; Vice President 
Ackerson; Mr. Wilkie, Mr. Tyre, and (?apt. Russel of the division of construction: 
Mr. Hague, of the construction and repair department; General Counsel Patterson, 
special asaifitant to the chairman Gillen. 

At the request of the chairman, Mr. Hague reported on the progress made in recon- 
" '^ning the ex-German passenger vessels to the effect that the Moccasin will be ready 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1615 

to go into commiflrion on or before December 15; that she is scheduled to start on her 
fixBt trip to South America on December 27; that the Huron is now bein^ fitted for the 
South American trade at the Morse shipyard in New York; that within a few days 
bids will be asked for conditioninff the De KaU), Aeolmg, and the Callao, for the South 
American run. He stated that the biggest problem was the reconditioning of th^ 
Leviathan; that present plans called for the International Mercantile Marine Go. to 
act as the agent of the division of operations in the reconditioning of that vessel toseiher 
^th the Agamemnon and the Mount Vernon^ because of the size of those vessels and 
the fact that that company has the necessary passen^ experience to enable it to get 
up the plans and look after the work. He described m some detail the difficulties of 
the work of reconditioning, and explained the efforts being made to secure lump- 
sum bids for the work on tne Leviathan, The chairman asked Mr. Hague's opinion 
as to the advisability of securing mechanics familiar with the electrical wiring of the 
Leviathan from the other side, and was informed that such action would not be advis- 
able at this time. 



International Mercantile Marine Oc, 

Office of President, 
New Yorhy November 29, 1919. 
Mr. Andrew Fletcher, 

New York City. 

Dear Sir: Keferrm^ to our several conversations with Mr. Mull and yourself regard- 
ing the st^imship Leviathan, as the Shipping Board are naturally anxious to be sure 
that no step is taken in this important matter without having carefully considered the 
whole fiela, in a conference to-day with Mr. Hague it was decided that we should send 
the following tel^am to the gentlemen whose names appear below. 

Mr. Hague and I are desirous of having Mr. Mull and yourself present at this inter- 
view, as we are anxious to have a perfectly frank discussion with all of the shipbuilders 
uponthis important matter: 

Telogjram to — 

M. A. Neeland, New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden; W. H. Todd, Todd 
Shipyards, New York; E. F. Morse, Morse Dry Dock & Repair Co., Brooklyn; H. L. 
Fere^son, Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News; J. W . Powell, 
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Bethlehem: 

''With object discussion rehabilitation Leviathan it would be greatly ajjpreciated 
by Mr. Hi^e of the Shipping Board and myself if ]^ou could attend a meeting at our 
office, 9 Broadway, at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning, December 3." 
Yours, very truly, 

P. A. S. Franklin. 

Copy to Mr. J. H. Mull, Cramp Ship &, Engine Building Co., Philadelphia. 



(This cablegram requires immediate attention — ^Please answer at once. Cable- 
gram, Amshibo, 1824. From London; received: Nov. 28, 1919.) 
U.S. Shifpino Board: 

Will make effort secure plan but entirely improbable that immediate success will 
attend effort. 

Amshibo 

Payne, Stevens, Donald, Scott, operations. 

Ha^e for action. 

Note. Presumably answers Boardsnavy 2061. 



November 28, 1919. 
International Mercantile Marine, 

New York City. 

(Attention Mr. W. F. Gibba, steamship LevtotAon.) 

Dear Sir: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of November 25 in con- 
nection with the inclining experiment on the above mentioned vessel. 

We be^ to advise that this work was this date put in hand, as outlined in your 
letter. 

Very truly yours, 

R. L. Hagitb, 
By , 

Passenger Ship Section, Conetruction and Repair Department. 



1616 SHIPPING BOABD OPERATIONS. 

November 25, 1919. 
Amshibo, 

London (England). 

Boards navy 2061 for Tohey . If you can secure from German builders at reasonable 
terms complete set of working plans, including general arrangement detail passenger 
accommodations, plumbing, electric lighting, joiner work and specifications steam- 
ship Leviathan, steamship Agamemnon, and steamship Mount Vemon, for merly Ger- 
man steamers Kaiser Witkelm II, Kronprintessin, and Vaterland would appreciate if 
you would procure and bring same over with you. 

Operations. 



mm* ^N«a j»a.« 

Manager 
Unit 



I>rrERNATioNAL Mbrcantine Marine Co., 

New York, November 25, 1919. 
Mr. R. L. Hague, 

Division of (Construction and Repair, 
United States Skipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

New York CUy. 
(Attention: Mr. Linck.) 

Dear Sir: In connection with the inclining experiment on the steamship Leviathan, 
it will be appreciated if you will order the W. & A. Fletcher Co. to go forward with 
the work of arranging weights and means to transfer same, toeether with plumb lines, 
straight edges, etc., as may be reauired and directed by tne representative of the 
William Cnunp & Sons Ship ana Engine Building Co., who will conduct the 
experiment. 

We find that it will be unnecessary' to employ the Merritt & Chapman Co., as a more 
satisfactory method of moving the weigh ^ nas been found. 
Very truly yours, 

William Francis Gibbs, 

Chiff of Construction. 

Construction and Repair Department, 

November 25, 1919. 
(Memorandum for Cable Department.) 
Please transmit the following cable to Mr. E. C. Tobey, London, England: 

**If you can secure from German builders at reasonable terms complete set of work- 
ing plans, including general arrangement detail passenger accommodations, plumbing, 
electric lighting, joiner work and specifications steamship Leviathan, steamship 
Agamamnon, and steamship Mount Vernon, formerly German steamers Kaiser Wil- 
helm II, Kronprinzessin and Vaterland would appreciate if you would procure and 
bring same over with you.** 

Acting Manager, 
Constnuiion and Repair Department. 
Approved: Dirsgtor of Operations. 



Division of Operations, 
UNfFED States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

Washingtonf November 25, 1919. 
(In reply to section 17.) 
(Personal memorandum for Mr. Hague.) 

Subject: Steamship Leviathan, cost plus contract. 

1. The following discussion is prompted by your remarks Saturday concerning 
the proposed work on the steamship Leviathan, and it is intended to suggest, un- 
officially some of the difficulties experienced with the old standard form cost plus 
contract, with a view to making definite provisions for their correction in any revised 
cost plus contract under discussion for the rehabilitation of that vessel. 

2. Direct labor: Are foremen, quartermen and leading men to be idlowed as direct 
labor? Subcontractor's men not to be considered direct labor for contractor. Selective 
audit of pay envelopes, occasionally. Unclaimed wages. Labor scale to be specified . 

3. Machine tool rates: If such are to be provided for in the contract, ^e rate diould 
not include "operator" since great difficulty is had in preventing duplication of 
operator's time in the labor chaises. Rate on air tools to include air. Rate on weld- 
ing apparatus to include material and power or gas. 



SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 1617 

4. Direct material: Only such as are permanently incorporated in the vessel. 
Staging and scaffolding not included. Candles, files, paint brushes, erection bolts, 
etc., not direct material. Costs to be sustained from receipted material invoices. 
Trade discounts are to be taken advanta^ of by Shipping Board. 

5. Scrap and salvage: To whom does it belong? Definition of, material suitable 
for reinstallation. 

6. Launch and truck hire: to be included in overhead? To be performed at net 
cost or at profit? 

7. Overnead: Definition of, to include cost of superintendence above foremen. 
Compensation insurance (workingmen's)? 

8. Subcontractors: Definition of, as distinguished from material, in which labor 
element is lacking. Percentage to be allowed on subcontracts. Will prime con- 
tractor be allowed to make a second profit? 

9. Overtime: Only when authorized in writing in each specific case. 

10. Dirty work: Whether to be paid (if the work is to be performed at Philsuielphia 
since the decision of ^e shipbuilding labor adjustment board was applicable to the 
Delaware River district). Definition of classes of dirty work. 

11. Payments on account: Periods. Percentage of total expenditures for labor, 
material and machine tools, to be advanced. Daily billing system to be followed. 

Frank S. M. Narris, 
Assistant General Atulitor of Repairs. 



November 25, 1919. 
Charles Cory & Son, 

New York City {steamship '* Leviathan**). 

Gentlemen: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 23d in regard to 

your electric oil-bumer control apparatus being installed on the steamship Leviathan. 

It is requested that you furnish us with such literature as )rou may have on this 

aj^paratus and also have }rour representative call at this office in order that we may 

discuss the matter in detail. 

Very truly, yours, 

R. L. Hague, 

By . 

Passenger Ship Section, Construction and Repair Department. 

November 24, 1919. 
(Memorandum for Mr. G. H. Jett, steamship Leviathan.) 

It has come to our notice that at the present time there is no heat in the crew's 
quarters on board the above-named vessel. 

If adequate facilities for heating this part of the vessel are not available, it is re- 
quested that crew be given authority to transfer to another part of the ship where 
beat cau be supplied. 

R. L. Hague, 

By , 

Passenger Vessel Section^ Construction and Repair Department. 

*"""^ Novi:mber 28, 1919. 

Memorandum for Mr. C. H. Jett, steamship Leviathan. 

Herewith for your information copy of letter from Mr. W. F. Gibbs, of the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine in regard to the inclining experiment of the steamship 
Leviathan^ together with copy of our answer to same. 

R. L. Hague, 

By , 

Passenger Vessel Section, Construction and Repair Department. 



United States Shipping Board, 

Washington, November 18, 1919. 
Memorandum to Mr. Hague. 

Maj. Cushing showed me Mr. Franklin^s letter re-reconditioning of the Leviathan, etc. 

I would Uke to have Mr. Franklin understand that you, as the representative of the 
ohipping Board, are to be and remain definitely in charge of that work and that 
wha^ver Mr. Franklin's company may do will be subordinate and suggestive. 

J. B. Payne, Chairman. 

<^opy to Maj. Cushing. 



1618 SHIPPING BOARD OPBBAnoifS. 



sTBAKsmp ''lbtiathan." 



1. All carpets, haD^Ings, linen and table ware, glaasware. stewardfl' and patmt^ 
outfits, and general ship suppliea and stores to be bought ana furnished by the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine Co. direct, and are not included in this a^eement. 

2. Tne W. & A. Fletcher Co., of Hoboken, N. J., in cooperation with the WilUam 
Cramp & Sons Ship & Engine Building Co., of Philadelphia, Pa., subject to the orders 
of the International Mercantile Marine Co., to do all technical, engineering, and 
structural work, including all fuel-oil systems with the necessary tanks, heaters, 
coils, pumps, and fittings and their installation, all electrical work, steam heating 
and plumbing, ship carpenter and joiner work, ventilating, insulation coverings, 
all rough and finished painting, cementing, such removal of old and defective work 
and re^t:)ration as may be necessary, and all miscellaneous work of every ch&iacter. 
The W. & A. Fletcher Ci. to have charge of the work to be performed by it and the 
Cramp Co. who in effect will be the Fletcher Co.*s associate constructors. 

3. The great extent, character, and conditions of the work are such, and labor 
conditions so disturbed with the probability they will remain so for many months 
to came and particularly during the reconditioning and outfitting of this ?h.ip, the 
Fletcher Co. and the Cramp Co. feel the beat interests of the United States Shipping 
Board would be con?erved by having the work done on a day's work basis in line with 
the current charges of the two companies. The daywork rates, tool charges, hours of 
labor, and overtime charges to be the same as now exist in the respective localities 
of the works of the Fletcher and Cramp companies. Should the rates of wages now in 
force be changed during the progress of the work the daywork rates will be corrected 
proportionately. All material to be charged at the invoice prices to the contractor 
plus 10 p3r cent for indirect expenses and 10 per cent for profit. The daywork rates 
and toll charges of the two corananies are hereto attached. 

4. If in the opinion of the Fletcher Co. and Crwnp any work may be given out to 
advantage the work flhall be given out subject to the International Mercantile Marine 
Co.'s approval, biit such contracts or arrangements to be handled by the Fletcher Co. 
as the principal contractor so that there shall be only one head subject to the direct 
orders of the International Mercantile Marine Co. 

5. It is understood that on all work the Cramp Co. will do for the ship through the 
Fletcher Co. the Fletcher Co. will receive no compensation or percenta^ on the 
Cramp Co. charges. On all contracts that the Fletcher Co. may sublet subject to the 
approval of the International Mercantile Marine Co. they shall receive 10 per cent 
to cover indirect charges and supervision. 

6. As the work will require from time to time the exclusive services in New York 
of the officers, department heads, and chief assistants of the Cramp Co., which services 
are not C3vered in the daywork rates submitted, it is understooa that the Cramp Co. 
will be paid for such services the sum of $4,000 per month during the period of the 
contract. 

7. Due to the arrangement made by the Cramp Co. with the United States Nav^' De- 
partment to the e*Tect that the Navy Department's work shall not be interfered with, 
while the Cramp Co. have given assurance they can do all the work required of them 
for the Leviathan J they desire to present all the circumstances to* said department. 

8. Bills for the work to be rendered and paid for monthly during the progress of the 
work. 

9. This proposal is made on the assumption that the work contemplated shall be done 
at the pier where the Leviathan is now moored, and that light, heat, and power, both 
on the pier and ship, shall be furnished to us, together with the necessary watchmen. 

10. It is understood that the United States wilt as^sume all usual risks on the steamer 
and materials delivered to the contractors ordinarilv coverable bv insurance. 



Day-rate charges for labor per hour: 

Blacksmith $1. 25 

Brass molder 1. 25 

Boilermaker 1. 25 

Carpenter 1.25 

Calker 1. 25 

Cementer and scaler 1. 00 

Coppersmith 1. 25 

Coremaker 1. 25 

Draftsman 1. 75 

Electricians 1. 25 

Helper— all trades 1.00 

Ironworker 1, 25 



W. A A. FLETCHER CO., HOBOKEN, N. J. 

NoVEIfBER 18, 1919. 

Day-rate charges for labor per 
hour— Continued . 

Joiner $1. 25 

Leading men — all trades 1. 50 

Machinist 1. 25 

Painter 1. 25 

Patternmaker 1. 50 

Pipefitter 1. 25 

Plumber 1. 25 

Rigger L25 

Tinsmith 1. 26 

Watchman 1. 00 



SHIPPING BOABD OPEBATION& 1619 

Overtime chaiges: Inside, 2 hours for 1; outdde, 2^ houre for 1. 

Tool charges, per hour: 

Airtoolfl $1.00 

Acetylene cutter with operator and gas 7. 25 

Acetylene welder with operator and gas .- 7. 25 

Automobile trucks with driver 3. 00 

Bending furnace, angle with operator 12. 00 

Bending furnace, plate with operator 16. 00 

Blade cutting machine, with operator : 1. 75 

Blow torch, oil without operator 1. 50 

Boring bar, portable with operator 2. 00 

Bolt cutter, portable with operator 1. 50 

Boring mill — 

Horizontal with operator r 2. 25 

Small with operator 2. 00 

7 feet with operator 2. 25 

10 feet with operator 3. 25 

Compressor shop, with operator 5. 00 

Compressor barges, floating with operators 10. 00 

Countersink, with operator 1. 75 

Drill— 

Laigp, with operator 2. 00 

Small, with operator 1. 50 

Radial, with operator 2. 25 

Electric drill, no operator 1. 00 

Electric welder, with operator 7. 25 

Flange fire, with operators 3. 50 

Floating derrick — 

60-ton, with operators 25. 00 

15-ton, with operators 15. 00 

Forge — 

Laige (1 blacksmith and helper) 3. 25 

Small (1 blacksmith and helper) 3. 00 

Hydraulic flange machine, with operators 5. 00 

Hydraulic pipe;-bending machine, with operator 2. 75 

Lathes up to 2 inches, with operator 1. 50 

Lathes, 2(>-30-inch, with operator 2.00 



30-40 inch, with operator 2.25 

40-60 inch, with operator 3.00 

120-inch, with apemtcm 6. 00 

Turret, with operator 3. 00 

Launch — 

Steam, with operat(H« 5. 00 

Gasoline, with operators 3. 00 

Locomotive crane, with operator 6. 00 

Milling machine, with operator 2. 25 

Pipe cutter — 

Large, with operator 2. 25 

Small, with operator 2. 00 

Pipeflange expanding machine, with operator 2. 75 

Planer — 

10 feet wide, with operator 6. 00 

6 feet wide, with operator 2. 75 

Small, with operator 2. 00 

Plate rolls— 

16-foot, with operator.-. 7. 00 

Vertical, with operator 4. 50 

Small, with operator 3. 25 

Punch and shears — 

Large, vnth operator 2. 50 

Small, with operator , 2. 00 

Plate planer, boiler 2. 75 

Rivet forge 1.00 

SawB for cutting metal 1. 50 

Shapcr, with operator 1. 50 

Sheet-metal tools, light, without operator 50 



1620 SHIPPING BOARD OPERATIONS. 

Tool charges per hour — Continued. 
Slotter— 

I ju^e. with operator .* 2. 25 

S mal ! , wi th operator 2. 00 

Steam hoee, .\-incn hoee 3. 00 

Steam hammers L 75 

Steam or air pum])B 5. 00 

Valve seating machine with operator, 2. 25 

Woodworking machines, with operator 2. 50 

Yard crane, with operator 6. 00 

All other tools, not specifically provided for 75 

WM. CRAMP A SONS SHIP A ENGINE BUILDING CO. 



Pay-rate charges for labor, per hour: 

' Machinist $1. 35 

Helper 1.00 

Patternmaker 1. 40 

Joiner 1. 30 

Helper 1.00 

(^arpenter 1. 30 

('alter (wood) 1. 30 

Helper 1.00 

Boilermaker 1. 30 

Helper 1.00 

Rigger 1.20 

Ironworker 1 . 20 

Helper 1.00 

Driiler 1.15 

C^hipper and calker 1 . 20 

Riveter 1.20 

Laborer 90 



Da>-rate charges for labor, per 
hour. — Continued . 

Cementer and scaler |0. 95 

Puncher 1.20 

Drv-dock men 1. 25 

Helper 1.00 

Painter (cementer) 1.15 

Painter (bottom) 1, 15 

Electricians 1. 25 

Helper 1. 00 

Blacksmith 1. 15 

Helper 1. 00 

Draftsman 1. 75 

Plumber 1. 30 

Coppersmith 1. 30 

Helper 1.00 

Foreman 1. 75 

Watchman 1. 00 



Double time charged for overtime. 
November 18, 1919. 

Construction and Repair Department, 

November 17, 1919. 

Memorandum for Mr. Jacobs, steamship Leviathan. 

Inclosed is copy of self-explanatory correspondence, to which I would suggest you 
direct Mr. Hague's attention upon the occasion of his next visit to New York. 

R. L. Hague, 

By , 

Comtruclion and Repair Department 



cruiser and tran.sport force — transport data. 

U. S. S. Leviathan (ex-steamship Vaterhnd), commissioned July 25, 1917, at Hobo- 
ken, N. J. 

Tonnage (tons) displacement, 69,000; cross, 54,282; net, 23,548. 

length over all, 954 feet 2 inches; B. P., 945 feet; beam (extreme), 100 feet 4} 
inches. 

Permanent ballast and kind, 265 tons pig iron. 

Battery, none. 

Radio, 5; one-half kilowatt; type, Telefunken. 

Maximum purchasing weight, Dooms, or other appliances, 5 tons. 

Dimensions of largest cargo hatch, 28 feet 6 inches by 21 feet. 

Cold storage for Navy (cuoic feet), frozen, 21,942; chilled, none. 

Total cargo capacity available for Army use, including general cargo and cold 
storage space (cubic feet), . 

Cold storage available for Army use, including in above (cubic feet), 143,000. No 
cold storage. 

Frozen, none. Chilled, none. 

Maximum sustained speed (knots), 22.2; coal or oil per dav (tons), 962.4; radius^ 
4,832. 



SHIPPIITG BOABD OPERATIONS. 



1621 





12 knots. 


14 knots. 


15 knots. 


18 knots. 


In port. 


Coal or of] per dav (tons) 


No data. 
do. .... 


No data. 
do 


552 


702 
5,456 


W5 


Steaminf radius (knots) 


*55 











I With deck machinery. 
' Without deck machinery 

Kind of fuel,* capacity (tons), bunkers, 8,700; total, 8,700. 

Maximum draft when loaded and ready for sailing, forward, 41 feet 2 inches; aft, 40 
feet 10 inches. 

Draft upon arri\'al in France, forward, 37 feet 6 inches; aft, 38 feet 4 inches. 

Fresh water capacity (tons), drinking, 4,144; feed, 1,526; distilling capacity per 
day, 250. 

i^ast dry docked at Liverpool, England, on November 3, 1918. 

Blimey gear installed at Liverpool, England, on Febniary. 1918. 

Troop capacity, officers, 488; noncoms., no quarters. Naval complement, officers, 
64: crew, 2,167.* 

E. H. DURBLL, 

Ca pterin J United States Navy^ CommaruHng. 

We propose as follows: 

(1) We, as your agent, will take pver and supervise the reconstruction and refitting 
of the steamship Leviathan according to plans and specifications to be prepared by 
us and submitted to you for final approval. 

(2) It is understood that you will appoint a representative to confer with us, to 
whom we will submit the plans and full information on the progress of the work and 

through whom we will eecure your appro\'al of plans contracts and general 

for expenditures. 

(3) You are to pay all expenses incurred in connection with the work except the 
salaries and office expenses of our executive officers, chief and assistant chief of con- 
struction, chief inspector, draftsmen, superintending engineer, marine superintend- 
ent, passenger and freight exeprts, victualing superintendent, traveling expenses, 
telephones, and in general the present I. M. M. ori^nization. 

(4) As your a^ent, we will negotiate and enter into all the necessary contracts for 
the reconstniction and refitting of the steamer, and will make all other necessary 
arrangements for the c )raplete preparation of this steamer as a first-class passenger 
carrier, and will employ for your account all necessary ]3ersonnel required in connec- 
tion with the work, such as officers, crew, watchmen, inspectors, foremen, etc. 

(5) All bills for the work, after hein^ approved, are to be paid for by you. 

(6) All our and other employees while engaged on this work shall be considered 
the servants of the United States and not of this company, and you are to hold us 
harmless from all claims of every kind and nature which, shall be made arising out 
of the refitting and reconstniction of this steamer, or